technology

DARPA makes Google Glass-like eye display for soldiers

DARPA makes Google Glass-like eye display for soldiers

Over-eye displays like that offered by Google Glass can serve many purposes -- they facilitate navigation without having to take one's eyes off the roads, for example, and allow data to be presented without pulling out a smartphone in the middle of a project. The military is one entity that can find ample uses for eye-mounted displays, and it is no stranger to such technology. Cost is a perennial problem, however, and so its mad scientist devision DARPA has come up with a budget-friendly Glass-like solution.

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Uber pays fines in Portland ahead of possible re-launch

Uber pays fines in Portland ahead of possible re-launch

Late last year, Uber arrived in Portland, Oregon. The service was unauthorized, and city officials weren’t taking it lightly. A covert operation to request rides and fine drivers was underway (they got two warnings before a fine, technically), which brought as much confusion to the scene as happy hipsters who could bypass the taxi system. After the kerfuffle, Uber agreed to withdraw from the city for 90 days. As City Hall considers new rules that would allow Uber to operate, the ridesharing service has agreed to pay $67,750 in fines handed down by the city over the unsanctioned launch.

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M3 autonomous 1mm computer might be the world’s smallest

M3 autonomous 1mm computer might be the world’s smallest

Computers are getting exponentially smaller. Ahead of the curve is the Michigan Micro Mote, or the M3. Designed with the Internet of Things (IoT) in mind and measuring in at ony 1 cubic mm, this autonomous computer might be the smallest computer in the world. It packs sensors and other features into a package about the sie of a grain of rice. It's amazing to consider that the computing power of today's smartwatch was not only impossible 60 years ago; computers that amounted to basic graphing calculators took up the space of entire rooms.

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Stanford has a battery that charges in a minute

Stanford has a battery that charges in a minute

Batteries. The lifeblood of our mobile devices and ironically also somewhat their Achilles heel. Although the evolution of lithium-ion batteries has made all these portable electronic devices possible, they haven't really caught up with the growing power that we keep in our pockets. That's not even considering yet the similarly growing obsession over thinner devices, which would require thinner batteries that deliver the same power. Stanford University researchers, lead by chemistry professor Dai Hongjie, might have stumbled on the answer in a new variant of an aluminum-ion battery.

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BKB, Hit Chip tech show how hard pro boxers really punch

BKB, Hit Chip tech show how hard pro boxers really punch

Boxing fans everywhere have an idea how hard their favorite fighter hits, at least when they see them in the ring snapping someone’s head back. There are a lot of variables with boxing, making the severity of a punch open to interpretation. Is Gennady Golovkin’s jab really than harsh? Is Ruslan Provodnikov as devastating as it seems, or is he just a suffocating brawler? New tech may answer that for us. In a recent BKB boxing match, the Rosado/Stevens title fight saw puches with as much as 600 lbs of force.

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Tiko unibody 3D-printer keeps it simple and cheap

Tiko unibody 3D-printer keeps it simple and cheap

Tiko is a small, unibody 3D-printer that is designed to be simple and user-friendly. 3D printers are revolutionizing the "maker" scene, but the numerous selections can be complicated and expensive. If you want to create basic plastic designs on the cheap and don't have space for a complicated printing setup, then Tiko might be for you. Best of all, Tiko can be yours for only $179 USD, but that's only the price for Kickstarter pledges. The price could go up when Tiko enters the market, but its creators haven't specified a retail price yet.

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LHC is active again; proton beams online and firing

LHC is active again; proton beams online and firing

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is back in action today, firing proton beams around its 27-kilometer track. The LHC has been out of active commission for two years for upgrades, maintenance, and consolidation. The most recent delay was due to a short-circuit. Its repairs didn't take as long as originally anticipated, but were tedious because the parts in need of repair operate at temperatures near absolute zero. So, the device had to be slowly thawed and then painstakingly re-frozen before it could begin operation again.

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South Korea to fight fire with fire, drones with drones

South Korea to fight fire with fire, drones with drones

If you can't beat 'em, join 'em. Or something like that. When South Korea notice a drone, with a camera, hovering near its borders, it decided that it needed to protect itself from such unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs. And what better way to do that than by using another UAV. Roboticists at the Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology or KAIST are trying to develop drones whose sole purposes would be to intercept and disable other drones. It's like Robot Wars, except in the sky and for less entertaining purposes.

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Delphi automated Audi SUV completes first coast-to-coast trip

Delphi automated Audi SUV completes first coast-to-coast trip

Autonomous and automated vehicles are coming no matter how you feel about them. Several major automakers are testing automated cars and the tech will start making its way to vehicles we can purchase before you know it. Delphi has been working with Audi on self-driving vehicles, recently Delphi and Audi's automated car made the first coast-to-coast trip ever taken by an automated vehicle.

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Drexel University library installs new iPad rental vending machine

Drexel University library installs new iPad rental vending machine

In a partnership with the Free Library of Philadelphia, Drexel University is launching an iPad vending machine for students and local residents. The last time most of us went to the library was in our student days in college. Even then, the quiet atmosphere was more attractive than the stacks of books. Librarians are acquainting themselves with the fact that students are still reading, but much of it is coming from digital sources and sitting in an uncomfortable chair at a library desktop computer isn't going to cut it, when it comes to digital literacy.

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