technology

Apple loses $532.9 million patent lawsuit

Apple loses $532.9 million patent lawsuit

In the latest case, Smartflash LLC v. Apple Inc., Apple was ordered by a federal jury to pay $532.9 million in damages to Smartflash LLC in a Texas courtroom. Smartflash is a small company that successfully took down Apple over intellectual property rights. Smartflash claims Apple infringed on three of their patents. They originally sought $852 million in damages while Apple contested that damages should be limited to $4.5 million. Smartflash has also sued Samsung and Google using the same patents pertaining to digital rights management, data storage, and managed access payment systems.

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This robot can play the violin, but can it dance?

This robot can play the violin, but can it dance?

Humans thought they had mastered a lot of skills better than robots, and violin playing is one of them. Automated instruments have come a long way from the days of the self-playing piano and the music box. This is the latest incarnation in mechanical instruments. It was created by Seth Goldstein, and he dubbed it the Ro-Bow. This invention can certainly play the violin better than me, but I've never touched a violin. So, with the right programming, could it play better than an actual violinist?

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SEER AR Helmet lets you see the world in 100 degree field of view

SEER AR Helmet lets you see the world in 100 degree field of view

Meet SEER developed by Caputer Labs, Inc. It boasts the world's largest 100 degree field of view for an augmented reality helmet. This field of view in SEER's "Immersive Augmented Reality Experience" is designed be be so large, that it becomes frameless. Its open source and controller flexibility create a uniquely immersive AR experience. The field of view on this device is massive. At 100 degrees horizontal, It compares to seeing a 200 inch (5.08 meter) from eight feet away. This is huge compared to Google Glass's 25 inches (63.5 centimeters).

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The Web grows up: HTTP/2 is done

The Web grows up: HTTP/2 is done

Given the fast-paced development and progress that we have when it comes to the Internet and Internet-connected devices, it can almost be too hard to imagine how old the World Wide Web really is. That reality check might soon become a topic now that the Web bells have started ringing. IETF HTTP Working Group chair Mark Nottingham has just announced on his blog that HTTP/2 has been approved and is on its way to become the new standard, following HTTP/1.1 which was adopted way, way back in 1999.

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Smart cars pose a serious privacy risk, says US senator

Smart cars pose a serious privacy risk, says US senator

Cars are getting more and more sophisticated, incorporating features or integrating with our smartphones. They might also be receiving some of weaknesses of mobile devices, with more frightening consequences. Senator Ed Markey of Massachusetts thinks that increasingly sophisticated high-tech cars are also getting more vulnerable to hacking, with all their wireless connectivity and access to personal information. And the even more worrying part is that, in the rush to put these technologies inside vehicles, car makers might not be aware of the dangers and might be foregoing stricter security measures.

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Google patents tech for helping you pronounce places right

Google patents tech for helping you pronounce places right

Google has just recently been awarded a patent for new tech that will dish up the correct pronunciation for "place" names, something that could make the frequent traveler's life a bit easier. The patent just recently surfaced on the USPTO's website and was granted on February 3, and in it Google details a new twist of technology that will take audio clips of a specific place being pronounced by those from the region, then use that to form audio suggestions aiding searchers in saying it correctly.

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Blending Buckyballs make for a nice but dangerous light show

Blending Buckyballs make for a nice but dangerous light show

Small, spherical Neodynium magnets, more popular by their commercial name "Buckyballs", have been declared illegal last year by the Consumer Product Safety Commission because of the danger they pose to children. To commemorate the commercial death, at least officially, of the hot geek product, as well as to dispose of it, Blendtec saw it fit to make the balls rest in pieces by putting it inside one of their blenders. Will it blend? Yes it does, somewhat. But it produces more than rubbish too.

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LG reveals extremely bendable Plastic OLED lighting modules

LG reveals extremely bendable Plastic OLED lighting modules

Screens won't be the only things that will be bending soon. Flexing ones again its manufacturing prowess, LG Chem, the company's chemical arm, which makes batteries among other things, is flaunting a new type of lighting panel. Aside from its extremely bright luminance, the main attraction for this module is its flexibility. Going beyond how far current glass-based OLED lighting modules can bend, these panels can flex and twist up to 30 mm, opening up the possibilities for this type of lighting source.

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Temporary tattoos measure sugar levels without drawing blood

Temporary tattoos measure sugar levels without drawing blood

Diabetics need to closely monitor their blood sugar levels. However, this crucial routine becomes more than a chore since it usually involved drawing blood. That is why researchers are continually searching for non-invasive, not to mention not painful, ways to measure glucose levels. Researchers from the University of California San Diego are looking into using temporary tattoos to perform this function without even breaking the user's skin, paving the way for other medical use cases as well, like delivering medicine through the skin as well.

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