technology

Researchers create machine capable of assembling complex molecules

Researchers create machine capable of assembling complex molecules

One of the more complex and time consuming tasks that researchers perform in the laboratory is the synthesizing of complex small molecules. Sometimes it can take years for a chemist to figure out how to build the molecule and describe its functionality. A group of researchers from the University of Illinois have created a machine that aims to make the process of creating these complex molecules much easier.

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Bloodhound SSC 1,000 mph car gets a bullet-proof exterior

Bloodhound SSC 1,000 mph car gets a bullet-proof exterior

The world's first 1,000 mph car, the Bloodhound SSC, just became bullet-proof. This car isn't going to hit the highway in a hail of gunfire, obviously. It plans to break the World Land Speed Record in 2016. At 1000 mph, the wheels will be doing 10,000 rpm, which is 167 revolutions per second. Going that fast, any tiny rock kicked up from the car could become a lethal projectile, derailing the entire run and killing its driver, Andy Green. The Bloodhound's design team is most concerned that a chunks of metal could get dislodged from the wheels themselves and then fly towards the cockpit at incredible speeds.

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Breitling enters the smartwatch market with its B55 Connected

Breitling enters the smartwatch market with its B55 Connected

Breitling is keeping it simple with its first smartwatch, the B55 Connected. This smartwatch does without a tangled cluster of apps, like the Apple Watch. In fact, the B55 Connected doesn't even offer touch screen controls. The B55 Connected is more of an enhanced timepiece than a new wearable mobile device. It aims to be classy and sleek, although it still has the rubberized sports band that is so ubiquitous in wearables. Breitling has managed to keep it simple by relegating most of the controls its smartphone app. Using Bluetooth wireless connectivity, the watch can sync with its proprietary app for easy controlling.

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USB Killer drive is a trap waiting to electrocute your laptop

USB Killer drive is a trap waiting to electrocute your laptop

Everyone is about to get a little bit more careful about what they stick inside their computer after reading this. Hopefully, you already know not to insert a random USB that you find on the ground into your laptop. Random USB drives could be used for phishing or viruses, and now they could be used as a bomb. Meet the USB Killer. It is designed to look like an innocuous flash drive, but inside it packs quite a punch. This little guy is designed to completely fry your laptop from the inside out.

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Audi’s Hackenberg future vision: tech, batteries, brains

Audi’s Hackenberg future vision: tech, batteries, brains

It is an exciting time for the automotive industry, with the convergence of different types of technologies ready to have cars zooming to the future. And Audi, naturally, is ready to face the future and make it real. That is the message that Prof. Dr. Ulrich Hackenberg, member of Audi's board for management for Technical Development, is giving out at the company's annual press conference. For the car maker, 2014 was the "year of technical milestones, tests and records." Hackenberg belives that 2015 and beyond will build on those lessons and turn them into technologies and products that will excite consumers.

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Equil Smartmarker transforms any surface into a smart surface

Equil Smartmarker transforms any surface into a smart surface

Everyone uses dry erase boards from schools to business presentations. Whiteboards are too ephemeral as the presenter always seems to be erasing the part we've just started reading. With Equil's smart technology, your whiteboard notes and drawings can last forever. Equil is adding to their line of smart pens with their new Smartmarker. Equil's Smartpen was designed for paper, but their Smartmarker can be used on any surface, especially whiteboards. Simply attach its magnetic base to the surface, and everything you write with the Smartmarker will be saved to its built-in memory.

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Liquid metal robots might be more than science fiction soon

Liquid metal robots might be more than science fiction soon

It's as if all the pieces are falling in place to give birth to the SkyNet nightmare that haunts us in the Terminator universe: self-driving cars, a fleet of interconnected Internet-bearing satellites, and now, shape-shifting and self-propelling metal. This last one was a recent discovery of a group of researchers in Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, who stumbled upon a peculiar behavior of a certain mix of metals that, in the end, could change its shape to fit moulds and paths and propel itself forward as well.

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Disney MagicBands wearable tech lets you explore Disney in a new way

Disney MagicBands wearable tech lets you explore Disney in a new way

In light of the recent Apple Watch unveiling, let's take a look at another wearable that is flying under the radar, specifically in Orlando. Florida's Disney World offers a lot to make it the "happiest place on earth." Recently, the park has been using its own wearable Disney MagicBands to create a new way for guests to interact with their Disney surroundings. They come in various colors with collectible straps so that everyone in your family should not only enjoy wearing MagicBands, but they will forget that they are actually wearing a smart device.

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Heart-on-a-chip tests drugs’ cardiotoxicity with its real heartbeat

Heart-on-a-chip tests drugs’ cardiotoxicity with its real heartbeat

Heart disease is the leading cause of death among Americans. Recently the bio-tech industry has been exploding with cardiac research like last week's heart attack preventing nanobots. New research by the team at the University of California, Berkley has created working human heart cells on a tiny chip designed to test the efficacy of new drugs in clinical trials. This heart-on-a-chip is officially known as a cardiac microphysiological system, or MPS. Using this heart-on-a-chip, scientists can measure the potential cardiac damage of a drug before it reaches expensive human trials.

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MatchGrid pioneers a six-way kidney donation chain

MatchGrid pioneers a six-way kidney donation chain

Organ transplant lists are notoriously long. Sometimes a patient in need has to wait years to receive a transplant, if they are lucky enough to receive one at all. The most successful transplants come from living donors, but a faithful friend isn't always a medical match to her friend in need. Enter MatchGrid, a biomedical program designed to match potential kidney donors and recipients. MatchGrid was created by former WIRED editor and kidney recipient David Jacobs. His program established a method to match twelve people and create a six-way kidney transplant chain.

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