Teardown

Motorola DROID costs $187.75 to make, claims iSuppli

Motorola DROID costs $187.75 to make, claims iSuppli

If teardowns are guilty titillation for the geek who likes to see must-have gadgets stripped to their component parts, iSuppli's versions are the respectable analysis that leave us believing we've actually learned something important afterward.  Latest across their bench is the Motorola DROID, and iSuppli reckon the Android smartphone costs Moto $179.11 in parts and a further $8.64 per handset to manufacture.

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Chumby One teardown: yep, it’s very hackable

Chumby One teardown: yep, it’s very hackable

Let this be a lesson, gadgets: no matter how cute you are, you'll still get the teardown treatment.  Notorious screwdriver-wielders iFixit have coaxed their latest device in front of the camera, and it's the Chumby One touchscreen WiFi radio/alarm clock/widget display.  The components themselves aren't too much of a mystery - after all, the Chumby team encourage such acts of hackery and modification - but there are still a few surprises lurking inside.

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Barnes & Noble nook cracked open, rooted

Barnes & Noble nook cracked open, rooted

The lure of Android has brought hackers to the Barnes & Noble nook like piranhas to still-kicking meat, and it turns out there's plenty of intrigue inside the ebook reader.  Over at nookDevs they've not only stripped the device to its bare circuitboards, they've also managed to root it.

Points of note include Android seemingly being loaded onto a 2GB internal microSD card - potentially a cause of sluggish OS performance - and a Samsung S3C6410 processor that's actually capable of OpenGL ES 1.1/ 2.0 among other things.  The Android install itself, meanwhile, is a generic OS 1.5 build with some B&N customization on top

What should be interesting is how the nook gets hacked, especially given the interesting hardware.  The nookDevs contributors have already figured out a way to spoof the DNS and feed content to the nook as if it came from B&N.

[via odobooks and via Twitter]

Sony VAIO X teardown reveals huge engineering ingenuity

Sony VAIO X teardown reveals huge engineering ingenuity

While we always enjoy the post-launch teardown photosets that spring up following a particularly noteworthy piece of hardware, sometimes we wish there was an engineer to hand to tell us whether what we're looking at really is all that impressive.  TechOn did just that with Sony's indecently-skinny VAIO X, in a seven part hands-on and teardown that pits an unnamed engineer - who, from the sound of it, works for a rival OEM - against Sony's ingenuity.  In case you hadn't guessed, the VAIO X really is a masterpiece of manufacturing.

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