Street View

Publicly peeing Frenchman sues Google

Publicly peeing Frenchman sues Google

Sometimes lawsuits are so stupid all you can do is sit back and laugh. I think the suit filed by a Frenchman against Google after the search giant's Street View vehicle caught the man urinating in his front yard certainly falls under the silly category. While the man's face was blurred, he alleges that fellow residents of his village of about 3000 people in the Maine-et-Loire region of France recognized him anyway.

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Seaview is Google Street View for the oceans

Seaview is Google Street View for the oceans

I would imagine we're all familiar with Google Street View. A new service has been announced that uses a small underwater scooter operated by a diver with a camera on the nose that slips through the ocean and photographs 360° images that is an underwater Street View type offering. The service is called the Catlin Seaview Survey, and it is joint venture between the University of Queensland, Google, and insurance firm Catlin Group.

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Google’s Eric Schmidt to testify before Senate Judiciary Committee antitrust subcommittee

Google’s Eric Schmidt to testify before Senate Judiciary Committee antitrust subcommittee

Google may have thought all of the legal wrangling that had to do with the revelation last year that its Street View vehicles were capturing WiFi data was behind it. As it turns out the issue may just not be heating up in the US with the announcement that executive chairman and former CEO Eric Schmidt will testify before the Senate in September. Schmidt will be in front of the subcommittee for anti-trust investigations.

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Google fined $142k for French Street View data collection

Google fined $142k for French Street View data collection

The French data privacy regulator, CNIL, has slapped Google with a whopping €100,000 ($142,000) fine for its collection of private data during Street View surveying. The biggest fine CNIL (National Commission for Information Freedom) has imposed since sanctions were authorized in 2004, while the regulator conceded that Google had agreed to delete all the data inadvertently gathered, it still believed "that Google has not refrained from using the data identifying WiFi access points of individuals without their knowledge."

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Google pays $1 compensation in Street View privacy case

Google pays $1 compensation in Street View privacy case

Google has agreed to pay a US couple $1 in compensation, after Aaron and Christine Boring, of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania accused the search giant of invading their privacy, trespassing, negligence and unjust enrichment when a Street View camera car was discovered to have driven onto their private driveway. According to the couple's lawyer, the compensation is "one sweet dollar of vindication."

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The Daily Slash: November 30 2010

The Daily Slash: November 30 2010

What sort of day begins with a possible verification of aliens and ends with fabulous Lamborghini wireless mouse? A day at SlashGear, of course! Philip Berne writes a lovely modern story about his wife's birthday (happy birthday!), Google invites the media to a holiday party, and Samsung mobile display shows off a flexible 3D OLED concept at FPD International. Google gets investigated for squeezing, the Android Marketplace is fully content rated, and Verizon promises a spectacular reveal of their 4G LTE network via invite - secrets in store? Let's hope! All this and MORE right freaking here on none other than The Daily Slash!

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Google to wipe accidental UK Street View data to escape further inquiry

Google to wipe accidental UK Street View data to escape further inquiry

Google has agreed to wipe the WiFi data it captured in the UK while shooting photography for its Street View service, with the UK deputy information commissioner agreeing that in doing so the search giant will escape fines or further inquiry. Although Google admitted to accidentally gathering information from unsecured wireless hotspots, the commissioner said that there was no indication that any of the data "had fallen into the wrong hands."

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