Street View

April Fools in the Tech World 2012 Round-up

April Fools in the Tech World 2012 Round-up

This year's April Fools 2012 Round-up contains some of the strangest notions yet, and as everyone knows at this time of year - some the the most promising concepts for our odd, odd future! Starting with of course Google's collection of such jokes - they've been on point with some of the most in-depth April 1st tricks for several years now, and we wouldn't want to deprive you of a single one of them. They start with an 8-Bit Google Maps - what else, of course! There's also Virgin Volcanic, Apple's patent of the rectangle, and Toshiba's announcement of several "Shapes" tablets which you can see in a lovely TV commercial below.

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Street View signs and house numbers get used in ReCAPTCHA

Street View signs and house numbers get used in ReCAPTCHA

If you've ever signed up for a forum account or newsletter on the Internet, you have probably run across the ReCAPTCHA system that has you enter characters you see in an image on the screen to prove you're a real person and not a spammer robot. For some reason, I always have a hard time making out letters in most of the ReCAPTCHA images.

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Google Street View Japan reveals fabulous Cherry Blossom Edition

Google Street View Japan reveals fabulous Cherry Blossom Edition

So you'd like to do one of two things: travel through Japan during the season when the Cherry Blossoms blast, or have a lovely time glancing upon them from afar - Google has you covered either way! With Google's Street View, you're able to see where you're going before you get there - if you use it with Google Maps. If on the other hand you'd like to explore the world through Google's special camera cars, clicking through the streets of residential and rural areas around the globe, you can do that too! A fantastic example of where Google is using Street View to the utmost visual advantage is in their 2012 guide for Japan's Cherry Blossom Season.

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Publicly peeing Frenchman sues Google

Publicly peeing Frenchman sues Google

Sometimes lawsuits are so stupid all you can do is sit back and laugh. I think the suit filed by a Frenchman against Google after the search giant's Street View vehicle caught the man urinating in his front yard certainly falls under the silly category. While the man's face was blurred, he alleges that fellow residents of his village of about 3000 people in the Maine-et-Loire region of France recognized him anyway.

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Seaview is Google Street View for the oceans

Seaview is Google Street View for the oceans

I would imagine we're all familiar with Google Street View. A new service has been announced that uses a small underwater scooter operated by a diver with a camera on the nose that slips through the ocean and photographs 360° images that is an underwater Street View type offering. The service is called the Catlin Seaview Survey, and it is joint venture between the University of Queensland, Google, and insurance firm Catlin Group.

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Google’s Eric Schmidt to testify before Senate Judiciary Committee antitrust subcommittee

Google’s Eric Schmidt to testify before Senate Judiciary Committee antitrust subcommittee

Google may have thought all of the legal wrangling that had to do with the revelation last year that its Street View vehicles were capturing WiFi data was behind it. As it turns out the issue may just not be heating up in the US with the announcement that executive chairman and former CEO Eric Schmidt will testify before the Senate in September. Schmidt will be in front of the subcommittee for anti-trust investigations.

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Google fined $142k for French Street View data collection

Google fined $142k for French Street View data collection

The French data privacy regulator, CNIL, has slapped Google with a whopping €100,000 ($142,000) fine for its collection of private data during Street View surveying. The biggest fine CNIL (National Commission for Information Freedom) has imposed since sanctions were authorized in 2004, while the regulator conceded that Google had agreed to delete all the data inadvertently gathered, it still believed "that Google has not refrained from using the data identifying WiFi access points of individuals without their knowledge."

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