SpaceX

Here’s what it looks like when your rocket launch aborts

Here’s what it looks like when your rocket launch aborts

A pilot's eye view of what happens when a rocket launch goes wrong is not something most would like to experience, but SpaceX can help you live it vicariously. Elon Musk's commercial space flight company has released capsule footage from the Dragon craft used in the launch abort system test completed successfully earlier this month, a vital backup should something go wrong when the ship starts taking human passengers up into Earth's atmosphere and beyond.

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SpaceX teases Mars-bound future with retro travel posters

SpaceX teases Mars-bound future with retro travel posters

Back in January, NASA published some inspirational travel posters for far away planets based on real travel posters from the past. Now SpaceX has followed suit, only it wants your attention to be solely on Mars — the subject of its new three retro posters. The space company dropped the posters on its Flickr account over the weekend, and though we doubt this is what life on Mars would actually look like, it’s a fun way to dream of a future in space while enjoy the nostalgia of classic science fiction-like artwork.

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NASA greenlights SpaceX’s Falcon 9 for less risky missions

NASA greenlights SpaceX’s Falcon 9 for less risky missions

It may have so far failed at the promise of a reusable space rocket, but things are still looking good for SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket. While it won't be carrying humans any time soon, it has at least been certified by NASA for Category 2 space missions. These missions are described as "medium risk", as they only involve carrying satellites and less critical and less expensive cargo. It may not be the Category 3 that SpaceX ultimately wants, but it's still a big step forward in boosting credibility and clout.

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SpaceX: Good news, future Dragon crew, you wouldn’t have been pulped

SpaceX: Good news, future Dragon crew, you wouldn’t have been pulped

SpaceX has successfully tested its Dragon launch abort system, having done so with a dummy in the Dragon capsule to see how well potential future occupants would handle such an event. Sensors were used to gauge what kind of forces the dummy was exposed to during the aborted mission, and according to a tweet SpaceX has since fired off, it held up perfectly fine. In fact, SpaceX says that had humans been in the capsule they would have been "in great shape".

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Watch SpaceX successfully test its Dragon launch abort system

Watch SpaceX successfully test its Dragon launch abort system

SpaceX hasn't had a great run with its rocket tests in recent weeks, but its bad luck changed with a successful trial of the Pad Abort Test, a vital process for keeping future space travelers safe at blast-off. The trial tool place at SpaceX's Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) in Cape Canaveral, Florida, this morning, seeing how Elon Musk & Co.'s brand new launch abort technology would work in practice. However, the crew onboard was a little less delicate than a human might be.

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SpaceX’s to fly Dragon V2, testing escape protocol with a dummy

SpaceX’s to fly Dragon V2, testing escape protocol with a dummy

SpaceX will be testing its Dragon V2 spacecraft on May 6th, specifically assessing the capsule's escape system that could save lives during its eventual manned missions. There is no change of humans coming to harm during this test mission because the only "person" going up with the capsule is Buster, the dummy. He'll ride almost one mile high as the rocket launches from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The capsule will then parachute from its apogee, into a splash-down landing in the Atlantic.

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Elon Musk insists SpaceX rocket landing will work (eventually)

Elon Musk insists SpaceX rocket landing will work (eventually)

While last week's news of the Falcon 9 rocket's oh-so-close-but-not-quite landing attempt was somewhat disappointing to SpaceX fans and observers, Elon Musk isn't giving up! The SpaceX founder commented in a pair of tweets on Saturday that they had determined the rocket's crash was caused by a slower than expected throttle valve response. The latest event is part of a continued attempt by SpaceX to land a rocket on a floating platform — as opposed to crashing into the sea — in order to reuse it in future launches.

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SpaceX CRS-6 mission success: Tweets from space

SpaceX CRS-6 mission success: Tweets from space

The SpaceX mission known as CRS-6 had two points of success - one up in space at the ISS, another in the Atlantic Ocean. While the Earthbound piece of this pie did not land successfully - but came OH SO CLOSE - the package delivered to the ISS did, indeed, arrive completely safely. Onboard were 2 tons of science and supplies - including coffee - for the crew of the International Space Station for all nations aboard. No more instant coffee for those above our heads doing science!

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New SpaceX Falcon 9 crash video shows how close they came

New SpaceX Falcon 9 crash video shows how close they came

SpaceX had a successful launch this week to send supplies to the ISS inside its Dragon capsule. The more interesting bit about the launch was SpaceX's latest attempt to have the Falcon 9 rocket land on a floating platform at sea so that it could be refitted and reused. The last time SpaceX tried to have the Falcon 9 land at sea on the platform it created a fantastic explosion.

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Watch the SpaceX rocket landing (now in video form)

Watch the SpaceX rocket landing (now in video form)

Before we'd only had tiny glimpses of the near-landing bit of the Falcon 9 rocket. Now we've got a fully operational video from off the starboard bow. This video shows how the rocket flew in at great speed, nearly - so very, very nearly - landing on the "Just Read The Instructions" autonomous sea craft. But with a final blast, it fell to the wayside. Time to try, try again, of course, as Elon Musk suggests they'll be approaching an 80% success rate by the end of this year.

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