Space

Espresso finally arrives on the ISS

Espresso finally arrives on the ISS

ESA astronaut Samantha Cristoferetti has made it to the International Space Station along with the rest of Expedition 42, but it may be the Italian's luggage that prompts the most excitement on the orbiting research platform. Among the equipment being brought up to the ISS is a special espresso machine, the first designed to work in zero-gravity, dubbed ISSpresso: handiwork of coffee stalwarts Lavazza and aerospace engineering firm Argotec, it needed to work around some significant environmental issues, like the fact that hot espresso couldn't be relied upon to drip down neatly into a cup.

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Elon Musk teases SpaceX’s “X-Wing” grid fins

Elon Musk teases SpaceX’s “X-Wing” grid fins

No, this doesn't mean that SpaceX's next spacecraft will be a starfighter from Star Wars. After all, these hypersonic grid fins make the Falcon 9-R look nothing like the almost iconic rebel ship. They do, however, still play a pivotal role, no pun intended. These fins are designed to help control and steer the rocket during its return trip from space. This will hopefully ensure that the craft will be able to land safely even on hard ground and survive to fly another day.

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NASA remasters stunning image of Jupiter’s moon Europa

NASA remasters stunning image of Jupiter’s moon Europa

NASA has again remastered images taken in the 1990s of Jupiter's icy moon Europa, and it is the most stunning version yet. In it we get a look at the moon's vein-like threading through an otherwise pitted and etched white landscape -- says the space agency, this image best shows what Europa would look like to the human eye, never mind that it itself resembles a close-up shot of an eye. This follows a different version of the moon NASA released back in 2001, which was lower resolution and had more saturated colors.

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Rosetta Philae lander detects organic molecules on comet surface

Rosetta Philae lander detects organic molecules on comet surface

After a decade long journey Rosetta was able to insert itself into orbit around its target comet and more recently, it sent its Philae lander down to the surface of the comet to see what the comet is made of. The latest report from the scientists running the Rosetta program is that the Philae lander has detected organic molecules on the surface of the comet. These organic molecules are carbon containing and are the basis of life here on Earth.

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Russian dashcams catch another explosion in the sky

Russian dashcams catch another explosion in the sky

Russia is well-known for the number of dashcams around to catch all varieties of interesting things, and thanks to those cameras we've seen quite a few explosions in the sky. This past April, some cameras caught another meteor on video, this one having happened in the nation's Murmansk region. That wasn't the last of the night-time light show however, and just recently another explosion has happened -- this one exceptionally bright and long-lasting -- and it was caught on camera in the Sverdlovsk region. We've got a couple different videos of it after the jump.

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AMC introduces the Unlimited Movie Ticket: Interstellar first

AMC introduces the Unlimited Movie Ticket: Interstellar first

Back when Star Wars was first released, it quickly became common - at least with a classic like that - to go to a film more than once in the theater. The trend was summoned once again with Titanic, then again with the Star Wars prequels. AMC Theaters and Paramount Pictures have caught on to the trend at last, revealing an "Unlimited Ticket." This is not like the subscription passes of the past for certain theaters or certain brands. Instead, this is a first-of-its-kind Interstellar-specific ticket.

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Philae comet lander goes to sleep as batteries near end

Philae comet lander goes to sleep as batteries near end

The Philae comet lander has gone into a sleep mode after being unable to get enough sunlight to recharge its batteries, the European Space Agency has reported. This follows a hiccup with landing that caused Philae to bounce off the comet's surface and eventually land elsewhere, with its final resting place being a position where it isn't able to get adequate sunlight. A ray of hope remains, however, as the mission controllers were able to rotate Philae enough before going idle that it may get more sunlight than previously available.

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Rosetta’s lander may be fading, but its photos are incredible

Rosetta’s lander may be fading, but its photos are incredible

Philae may be lost somewhere on Comet 67P, rapidly running out of power, and yet to tie itself down safely, but that's not stopping the Rosetta mission from sending back some incredible photos of the hurtling space rock. Images captured both by the lander itself and the Rosetta rocket that delivered it to Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko - and is currently orbiting it as a radio lifeline back to Earth - show the incredible surface both from close orbit and from Philae's unexpectedly awkward current resting place, though how much longer the probe will be able to send back footage is unclear.

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Philae future in question as comet lander battery dwindles

Philae future in question as comet lander battery dwindles

The Philae lander that traveled 3.98 million miles to land on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenkohas is now frantically attempting as much scientific research as it can, with the ESA concerned that its batteries could die in less than a day. The European Space Agency planned to run Philae, its Rosetta mission probe to a comet hurtling 80,000 mph through space, through until March 2015, investigating how the icy space rock was affected by the sun as it travels in the solar system, but an awkward landing - or, more accurately, three landings - has left the future of the experiment in question.

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Virgin Galactic pilot speaks amid tech woe whispers

Virgin Galactic pilot speaks amid tech woe whispers

Concerns have been raised about Virgin Galactic's safety and the pace at which development was driven, in the aftermath of the SpaceShipTwo crash which killed one pilot and left the other dependent on his automatic parachute deployment to survive. Richard Branson's ambitious space tourism scheme has been in disarray for several years, insiders claim, with secret technical issues at odds with the public roadmap for commercial flight. Meanwhile, pilot Peter Siebold told the National Transportation Safety Board that he was unaware that his copilot had unlocked the aerodynamic elements of SpaceShipTwo, believed to have been instrumental to the crash taking place.

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