Space

You’re going to Mars, I went to NASA

You’re going to Mars, I went to NASA

I woke up at 5:30 AM after a string of nightmares about being left alone on a dusty red planet. Like a fool I'd eaten a gigantic piece of chocolate cake the night before while watching a set of tiny teaser clips of "The Martian" to mentally prepare for the next day, which was then, now, today. "It's OK," I told myself. "Stay calm. You're in Houston. You're on East NASA Parkway in the same hotel you'd checked in to the day before. Today you're going to go on a brief ride in a Mars rover and talk to an astronaut."

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New Orbital ATK Cygnus launched to bring science equipment to ISS

New Orbital ATK Cygnus launched to bring science equipment to ISS

Recent rocket launches like that of the Super Strypi in Hawaii have been met with accidents and failure, leading to the lost of valuable, not to mention expensive, equipment. So when Orbital ATK's enhanced Cygnus rocket launches successfully, carrying 7,000 lbs worth of scientific tools and machines, NASA and Orbital definitely have reason to rejoice. The rocket is headed to the ISS to deliver its scientific payload, along with other interesting gadgets, and hang around for a month before plummeting to its death back to Earth.

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New Horizons images shows off Pluto’s mountains

New Horizons images shows off Pluto’s mountains

Last summer the New Horizons spacecraft made its closest pass by the dwarf planet Pluto. The spacecraft is still sending back data and images and the latest images to be released by NASA are now available. These images show part of a sequence of images that were snapped near the probe's closest approach to Pluto and have resolution of 250-280 feet.

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Spotted, a Dark Matter creche and its monstrous baby galaxies

Spotted, a Dark Matter creche and its monstrous baby galaxies

A creche of monstrous baby galaxies, swaddled in dark matter and billions of light years from Earth, could help answer questions about how the known universe formed. Monstrous galaxies, rapid stellar incubators, are no longer a feature of the universe, though ten billion years ago they pumped out new stars up to thousands of times the rate of current production.

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ESA astronaut Tim Peake will run London Marathon on ISS

ESA astronaut Tim Peake will run London Marathon on ISS

For many people, being on the International Space Station would be a good excuse to put off running that marathon you’ve been planning for a few years. Not so for ESA astronaut Tim Peake who plans to run the London Marathon next April…from space. He’ll do so on a treadmill located in the International Space Station’s Tranquility Node while a medical team keeps tabs on his health to make sure nothing goes awry.

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Virgin Galactic adds “Cosmic girl” 747-400 jet to fleet

Virgin Galactic adds “Cosmic girl” 747-400 jet to fleet

Virgin Galactic has announced that it has added a new aircraft to its fleet of space access vehicle. The new aircraft is a 747-400 and it is dubbed "Cosmic Girl" by Virgin. The aircraft will be used as a dedicated launch platform for the LauncherOne orbital vehicle.

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Fast Radio Burst from space found rich with data

Fast Radio Burst from space found rich with data

While astronomers have known about Fast Radio Bursts for a while now, never before have they been able to be utilized as they are here in the year 2015. A study has been published which not only shows where one unique fast radio burst likely originates from, but what sorts of elements in encountered on its way to our sensors, billions of light-years away from its source. Behold, FRB 110523, the object of this galactic study. The data it brings tells tales of its travels.

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SpaceX considering attempt at landing rocket on land

SpaceX considering attempt at landing rocket on land

SpaceX wants to make it cheaper to launch cargo and people into space in the future. One way to do this is to land the rockets used to push cargo off the ground so they can be reused rather than junked each time. SpaceX has tried several water-based landings using a floating barge and so far had no success.

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Japanese Akatsuki spacecraft gets second chance at Venus

Japanese Akatsuki spacecraft gets second chance at Venus

The Japanese space organization JAXA launched a probe aimed at Venus half a decade ago called Akatsuki. The spacecraft traveled through space for a bit over five months and when it went to insert itself into orbit around Venus, a thruster failed and it sailed past its target. At the time, scientists at JAXA thought that the next chance for Akatsuki to reach Venus would be seven years away.

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NASA Space Cups let astronauts drink liquids without a straw

NASA Space Cups let astronauts drink liquids without a straw

The days of astronauts having to drink to liquids from a vacuum-sealed pouch with a straw may soon be over. NASA and engineering firm IRPI have teamed up for a new study involving experimental "Space Cups" that allow astronauts in microgravity to drink from a glass as they would on Earth. The Space Cups are currently aboard the International Space Station for the Capillary Beverage Experiment, and while they may not be as fancy as the concept space glass from whiskey distillery Ballantine, they do function similarly.

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NASA’s James Webb Space telescope gets its first mirror

NASA’s James Webb Space telescope gets its first mirror

One small step for James Webb, one giant leap for telescopes, or something like that. NASA has just proudly announced that the first of 18 mirrors has just been installed the soon to be completed James Webb Space Telescope. Just one mirror, you say. So what's the big deal, you ask? Considering that just this one mirror can fit around seven mirrors from the Hubble Space Telescope and considering James Webb is set to replace dear old Hubble by 2018, that's quite the milestone achievement indeed.

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Scientists discover star-swallowing black hole

Scientists discover star-swallowing black hole

A Johns Hopkins University-led group of international astrophysicists have just published a new report in the journal Science about the first ever witnessing of a star being swallowed by a black hole. The scientists monitored the event, describing a star that was about the size of our sun, getting pulled from its course by the massive black hole's gravitational pull, and then being swallowed whole.

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