SOPA

SlashGear 101: SOPA and PIPA explained in plain English

SlashGear 101: SOPA and PIPA explained in plain English

If you've not heard of either SOPA or PIPA in the last few weeks and months in your journeys through the internet, now's the time to get educated, and quick. While the most recent news has been that the White House reaction to the SOPA bill specifically has effectively curbed it, there's no reason why it can't pop up again with a different name or a couple of simple changes that allow it to pass silently. These two bills, SOPA and PIPA, are amongst the most dangerous pieces of legislature ever to be written up for passage by the United States government in regards to innovation and the free market on a global scale today: this post will tell you why.

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Wikipedia blackout a “broad global message” about SOPA/PIPA peril says Wales

Wikipedia blackout a “broad global message” about SOPA/PIPA peril says Wales

Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales has defended the online encyclopedia's decision to stage a global blackout in protest of SOPA and PIPA this week, arguing "US law, as it impacts the internet, can affect everyone." Wales hopes the blackout - which will see the English-language version of Wikipedia replaced with an open letter encouraging US citizens to contact their Representatives and voice their concerns with the Stop Online Piracy Act and Protect Intellectual Property Act - will prompt even those outside of the US to contact friends and family living there and encourage them to speak up on the proposed legislation, he told the Telegraph, as "a broad global message" about censorship.

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Wikipedia joining Wednesday’s anti-SOPA blackout

Wikipedia joining Wednesday’s anti-SOPA blackout

Wikipedia has decided to join the protest against the Stop Online Piracy Act and the Protect IP Act by shutting down its English site for 24 hours on Wednesday, January 18. It will be joining companies like Reddit, which had announced last week that it would go offline for 12 hours on Wednesday. Both sites will temporarily shutdown and display only a message urging against the SOPA and PIPA legislation.

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SOPA shelved after Obama announcement

SOPA shelved after Obama announcement

Opponent of the Stop Online Piracy Act, California congressman Darrell Issa noted today that he'd been told by House majority leader Eric Cantor that there would be no vote on SOPA "unless there is consensus on the bill," this essentially shelving the project until further notice. This move "effectively scuppers" SOPA, as the Guardian notes, and puts pressure on the next most notorious bill regarding these matters, the e-Parasite act, as it comes to a vote on January 24th. This is the victory we've been waiting for, folks, unless you're a big media company that hoped to mis-use the bill, of course.

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Murdoch blasts Google as “Piracy leader”

Murdoch blasts Google as “Piracy leader”

Outspoken News Corp. chief Rupert Murdoch has launched a renewed attack on Google, calling it the "piracy leader" of the internet and accusing it apposing SOPA as it makes money off adverts shown around illegal content. Murdoch turned to Twitter for his rant, seemingly triggered by the Obama Administration's comments this weekend that it had concerns over the controls implicit in the Stop Online Piracy Act.

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Obama’s geeks speak out on SOPA

Obama’s geeks speak out on SOPA

The US government has responded to the internet uproar over the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and PROTECT IP Act (PIPA), promising that any acts challenging piracy will not go to the House of Representatives without consensus being found first. "While we believe that online piracy by foreign websites is a serious problem that requires a serious legislative response," President Obama's IP, technology and cybersecurity chiefs wrote today, "we will not support legislation that reduces freedom of expression, increases cybersecurity risk, or undermines the dynamic, innovative global Internet."

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NVIDIA opposes SOPA publicly

NVIDIA opposes SOPA publicly

There's been a bit of controversy happening over the past month or two, ramping up especially here in the last few weeks, centering in on companies and big names who have not necessarily said they support the internet censorship bill known as SOPA, but haven't opposed it either. At the start of this week, attention was turned to NVIDIA who, up until this week, had not come out in support or opposition to SOPA (otherwise known as Stop Online Piracy Act). Earlier today, NVIDIA's Bob Sherbin posted specifically SOPA is not something they support.

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Anonymous joins anti-SOPA blackout as Wikipedia mulls support

Anonymous joins anti-SOPA blackout as Wikipedia mulls support

Loosely-gathered hack collective Anonymous has announced it too will be joining reddit's anti-SOPA blackout on January 18, with Wikipedia apparently considering to participate in the online protest as well. "On Jan 18th you will see no tweets from this account between 8a and 8p EST in support of #SOPAblackout!" the group's AnonymousIRC account tweeted, referring to the user-curated site's decision to go offline to raise awareness of the pending act. Meanwhile, Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales said he was "all in favor" of the blackout, and that  it would be great if [Wikipedia] could act quickly to coordinate with Reddit."

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Reddit anti-SOPA blackout on January 18

Reddit anti-SOPA blackout on January 18

Reddit has announced that it will be staging a twelve hour blackout in protest of SOPA, the Stop Online Piracy Act, with visitors to the crowd-curated site on January 18 presented with a call to arms against the proposed legislation. From 8am to 8pm EST next wednesday, Reddit will be showing a message pointing out how the site could be affected should SOPA be passed into law, along with links to resources and possible ways to take action.

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CES 2012 speaks out against SOPA

CES 2012 speaks out against SOPA

This week at the Qualcomm keynote event on the second full day of CES 2012, a big message has been sent to Washington direct from CES leaders: we do not want SOPA to pass. To do this, they've displayed a website by the name of Declaration of Innovation. To get to this site and join the "nerd army" as they say, head to DeclareInnovation.com and speak out against the majorly overly broad set of laws being passed as we speak to fight piracy but in actuality set to harm innovation on the whole.

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