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Facebook mood test outrage is FUD claims ex-researcher

Facebook mood test outrage is FUD claims ex-researcher

One of the former Facebook data scientists at the heart of the recent controversy over mood manipulation and tests run on unwitting users has spoken out, claiming his quotes were taken out of context, and defending the social network's experimentation. Data scientist Andrew Ledvina, who left Facebook in April, was one of the originally quoted sources when the psychological research carried out by the site surfaced late last month, used to illustrate how Facebook lacked safe review processes for tests performed on its users. Now, Ledvina says that the reporter he spoke to mis-represented the facts.

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Facebook Mood Study: The Facts

Facebook Mood Study: The Facts

Earlier this month it was made apparent that a study was conducted on Facebook users by the Facebook, Inc. Core Data Science Team. A total of 689,003 Facebook users were "exposed to emotional expressions in their News Feed" according to the study, testing whether "emotional contagion" is able to occur without direct interaction between people. Turns out it is, indeed possible to change people’s emotions without nonverbal cues.

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Facebook psych experiment explained, Andreessen chimes in

Facebook psych experiment explained, Andreessen chimes in

Facebook is, unsurprisingly, embroiled in yet another scandal. Surprisingly, it isn't directly related to privacy but comes quite close. The social networking giant has been revealed to have manipulated their news feed ever so slightly in order to see the effects on the moods of its users. Sounds almost harmless until you learn that the findings were recently published in a Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) paper.

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Facebook Slingshot takes on Snapchat with demanding sharing

Facebook Slingshot takes on Snapchat with demanding sharing

Facebook Slingshot, the social network's stab back at Snapchat, has launched: an ephemeral photo-sharing app which demands social interaction if users actually want to see each other's pictures or video. Like Snapchat, Slingshot doesn't save images but instead only makes them visible for a limited period of time; however, rather than just tapping to view received content, to "unlock" it users will need to share something back - or "sling" it, in Slingshot parlance - first.

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