security

In defiance, Apple works on making iPhone harder to hack

In defiance, Apple works on making iPhone harder to hack

Following the hoopla concerning Apple’s battle with the FBI over unlocking the San Bernardino shooter’s iPhone comes a new report claiming the company is working on the development of new security measures that’ll prevent it — and the government — from breaching the phones. This will be a big blow for law enforcement and various government agencies, which have sought backdoors to the encryption.

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Nissan Leaf vulnerability opens climate controls to hackers

Nissan Leaf vulnerability opens climate controls to hackers

The Nissan Leaf electric car has a security issue that leaves it vulnerable to hackers, security researcher Troy Hunt has revealed. The vulnerability leaves the Leaf's climate systems -- the air conditioner and heater -- open to hackers, and it all revolves around the auto maker's companion mobile app. While the vulnerability doesn't risk the drivers' personal safety, it does provide an avenue for someone to drain a Leaf's batteries.

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NYPD wants access to ALL iPhones (with a warrant)

NYPD wants access to ALL iPhones (with a warrant)

The New York City Police Department says they'd like Apple to unlock every iPhone currently subject to a court-ordered search. Once the San Bernardino doors are broken down by the FBI, the NYPD has made clear: they want in, too. That'd mean every iPhone entered into evidence in a court case and subjected to a search ordered by a judge could be forced open by law enforcement, courtesy of a piece of software they've forced Apple to create. That software would be an entirely new version of iOS which the FBI (then the NYPD, and every other law enforcement agency in the USA) would then install on each iPhone, bypassing Apple's security measures, opening the locks to access data. You might be asking yourself, "why is that so bad?"

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FBI’s backdoor iPhone access is just the beginning: Apple asked to open 9 new phones

FBI’s backdoor iPhone access is just the beginning: Apple asked to open 9 new phones

Apple's battle with the US government has been going on for around a week now, and it doesn't look as though there's any end in sight. There is a lot of debate as to whether Apple is in the right or wrong, with their stance on not unlocking the San Bernardino shooter's phone. However, it seems as though Apple has been right about at least one thing.

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FBI vs Apple fight update: Bill Gates recants (sort of)

FBI vs Apple fight update: Bill Gates recants (sort of)

While yesterday it seemed that former Microsoft CEO Bill Gates landed squarely on the government's side of a recent legal dispute between the FBI and Apple. The case involves a locked smartphone owned by one of several San Bernardino shooters, and whether or not Apple should be obligated to create a new version of their iOS operating system to allow access to data stored within said device. It would appear that Bill Gates doesn't think the case is as black and white as most would suggest.

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FlexEnable’s sci-fi wearable previews a flexible display future

FlexEnable’s sci-fi wearable previews a flexible display future

Flexible displays may be a mainstay of science-fiction, but it's only recently that they've started to filter through into production. FlexEnable hopes to overshadow Samsung's curved OLED with its own technology, relying on cheaper LCD panels that use plastic substrates rather than glass so as to be both more imaginatively-shaped and more resilient to impacts and other damage.

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Apple responds to questions about San Bernardino case

Apple responds to questions about San Bernardino case

What do you do when you're at work, and your boss asks you to do something that you find to be unethical? Maybe you go over his head, and talk with his boss, or even someone in HR. But what happens when the US government gives you an order to do something like that? If you're Apple, you can't really go over the government's head. But you can go to the people.

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FBI ordered San Bernardino county to reset shooter’s iPhone

FBI ordered San Bernardino county to reset shooter’s iPhone

If the consequences weren't so dire, the developments it the case of the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone are almost too comical to be real. The matter, however, is very serious, both for those whose lives were lost and affected in last year's shootings as well as for the future of mobile device legislation. In the most recent back and forth between the US government and Apple, the FBI finally acknowledged that it had a hand in getting the iPhone's iCloud password reset, and act which Apple claims has closed the doors on harvesting the device's data without requiring a backdoor.

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Why John McAfee’s offer to unlock San Bernardino iPhone makes sense

Why John McAfee’s offer to unlock San Bernardino iPhone makes sense

The biggest news this week isn't about some new device hitting the market, or a major technological breakthrough. Instead, it's about one older iPhone. While no one might think twice about an iPhone 5c, this phone could radically change the state of cybersecurity in our country, and even the world. This phone was once owned by the San Bernardino shooter, and at the moment, no one can unlock it.

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Hospital pays 40 bitcoin ransom to unlock computers

Hospital pays 40 bitcoin ransom to unlock computers

The Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center, which has had its computer systems held ransom by malware since February 5, has paid 40 bitcoins to have their systems restored. Initial reports claimed that a hacker was seeking 9,000 bitcoins, or about $3.5 million, to remove the ransomware, but a new report claims the hospital has paid the equivalent of about $17,000 USD in digital currency.

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Apple letter outlines why it doesn’t want to give FBI an iOS backdoor

Apple letter outlines why it doesn’t want to give FBI an iOS backdoor

In their effort to collect data and evidence in the case against the terrorists who killed multiple people in San Bernadino last year the FBI has been working with Apple to gain access to the shooter's iPhone. Apple was ordered this week to disable autowipe on the iPhone collected as evidence in the case. Autowipe is a security feature that deletes data from the phone if the password is entered incorrectly too many times.

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Hackers release cache of Turkish National Police data

Hackers release cache of Turkish National Police data

Hackers have released a large load of data nabbed from the Turkish General Directorate of Security (EGM), according to a new report. The data was stolen by a hacker said to be associated with Anonymous, and was done in a bid “against corruption.” The data is available now through various file sharing services, and appears to contain database files. This isn’t the first time Anonymous has set its sights on Turkey, with last year involving a declaration of war over the nation’s alleged support of terrorists.

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