security

Samsung registers trademarks for Galaxy Iris and Galaxy Eyeprint

Samsung registers trademarks for Galaxy Iris and Galaxy Eyeprint

Samsung has filed for some new trademarks for product names that could be for features rather than for new products. The two trademarks were filed for in the US and South Korea and are for Galaxy Iris and Galaxy Eyeprint. Samsung recently launched a tablet in India called the Galaxy Tab Iris that was focused on biometric iris security for registering children for government assistance programs.

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Yahoo has made three National Security Letters public

Yahoo has made three National Security Letters public

National Security Letters are a big deal, and that’s because companies face severe restrictions related to them. No company has been able to make the nature of the letters, nor the number or even a narrow range of the number of letters received, public. As consumer fears about privacy invasions led to a fast scramble on tech companies’ parts to be more transparent, certain law changes have come about, and one of them has led to Yahoo disclosing publishing National Security Letters.

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Why the MySpace hack matters to you, a non-MySpace user

Why the MySpace hack matters to you, a non-MySpace user

If you've ever used MySpace in the past, now is the time to change your current passwords. Don't bother changing your MySpace password - that ship has essentially sailed (unless you still use MySpace). I mean change every other password you have, especially if you happen to be using the same password now that you used back then, but here and now for a different service. This is more common than you might think. Lots of people do it.

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Facebook Messenger may get an encrypted mode this summer

Facebook Messenger may get an encrypted mode this summer

Facebook Messenger may offer users an encrypted messaging mode this summer, according to sources, following behind WhatsApp, Viber and some other services in offering users a more secure messaging option. This isn't the first time we've heard rumors of Messenger encryption plans, but is the first instance of some big details being offered. Among other things, the sources say this encryption feature will be opt-in.

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Android SoC security keys extracted: Qualcomm TrustZone in question [UPDATE]

Android SoC security keys extracted: Qualcomm TrustZone in question [UPDATE]

A security exploit appears to have been discovered which allows smart devices (mostly Android) with Qualcomm processors to be hacked into easily. This story began as documented on the blog Bits, Please back in April of 2015, when user "laginimaineb" decided to reverse-engineer Qualcomm's TrustZone implementation on Snapdragon processors. Using a Nexus 5 smartphone, this user detailed "a chain of vulnerabilities that I've discovered which will enable us to escalate our privileges from any user up to the highest privilege of all - executing our code within TrustZone itself."

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North Korea may be hacking banks across the world

North Korea may be hacking banks across the world

North Korea, allegedly behind the Sony Pictures cyberattack and more, could be behind a series of bank hacks across the globe resulting in tens of millions of lost dollars. Researchers with Symantec cite a recent trio of attacks that involved rare code seen in both the Sony cyberattack and earlier attacks against companies — including banks — in South Korea and the US. Assuming North Korea is behind the attacks, it would be a worrisome and exceedingly rare instance in which a nation-state is hacking global banks to steal money.

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Google threatens public shame for Android update slowpokes

Google threatens public shame for Android update slowpokes

Google is considering naming-and-shaming Android device manufacturers who fail to deliver prompt updates, it's claimed, in an attempt to close the fragmentation gap with Apple. The heavy-handed tactic would see Google make public its existing lists of well-performing - and, conversely, laggardly - phone and tablet makers, ranked by how timely they are to deliver new Android versions and security patches to their users.

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Google Project Abacus coming by the end of 2016

Google Project Abacus coming by the end of 2016

Last year at Google I/O one of the things that was talked about and sounded pretty cool was Project Abacus. This project is a fancy authentication system that doesn't require the user to enter a password or fingerprint to gain access to apps. Rather than required any scanning or typing, Project Abacus analyzes how the user types, swipes, moves, and talks to allow them access to apps.

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Ecigs now banned from checked airline luggage

Ecigs now banned from checked airline luggage

The U.S. Department of Transportation has banned e-cigarettes from checked airline luggage, announcing the change today. According to DOT, putting e-cigarettes or ‘vapes’ in checked baggage poses a fire risk, with there having been several incidents in the recent past related to the matter. The ban doesn’t mean you can’t take your ecig with you, though -- you'll just have to make sure it's in your carry-on.

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TeslaCrypt ransomware creators apologize, release master decryption key

TeslaCrypt ransomware creators apologize, release master decryption key

Have you ever done something that you knew was bad, but did it anyway? And then later you felt really bad about it, and wanted to make up for what you did? Well that's exactly what happened to one group of ransomware makers.

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iPhones now require a passcode to be entered once every six days

iPhones now require a passcode to be entered once every six days

One of my favorite features to come to the iPhone was the fingerprint reader. I've had laptops in the past with the feature, but I never really found myself using it very often. However, with a smartphone, it's so nice to just press and hold my finger for a second or two, rather than tapping in a passcode. A recent change to iOS means that you'll have to start using your passcode a little more often than before, though.

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2012 Linkedin hack is back to haunt 117 million users

2012 Linkedin hack is back to haunt 117 million users

Remember way back in 2012, when Linkedin was hacked? It's been a few years, so if you don't remember, that's understandable. Back then, roughly 6.5 million users had their passwords shared online, thanks to a hacker that was able to obtain them. Thankfully, the released passwords didn't have the account email addresses listed with them, which meant that there were likely no unauthorized logins to the site.

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