security

Chrome bug aids in pirating Netflix, Amazon videos

Chrome bug aids in pirating Netflix, Amazon videos

DRM, or Digital Rights Management (some call it Digital Restrictions Management), is a class of technologies and software aimed to protect copyrighted material from unauthorized access, a.k.a. piracy. But what if that DRM itself is guilty of helping pirates do exactly that? That is somewhat the position Google is finding itself in when the DRM technology it uses in its Chrome browser has been found to have a bug that actually makes it easier to lift encrypted videos streamed from the likes of Netflix or Amazon Prime and spread them around illegally.

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Google CEO Sundar Pichai gets hacked by OurMine

Google CEO Sundar Pichai gets hacked by OurMine

Google CEO Sundar Pichai has had his Quora account hacked by OurMine, the same hacker group that gained access to Mark Zuckerberg's twitter and Pinterest accounts earlier in June. Since Pichai's Quora account was tied to his twitter account, the messages the hacker group sent out also went out to the 508,000 followers of the Google CEO on twitter.

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US Customs wants to check social media accounts of foreign visitors

US Customs wants to check social media accounts of foreign visitors

In addition to providing documents on their identification and travel permissions, foreign visitors entering the US may soon be asked to give their Twitter and Instagram accounts to Customs and Border Protection. The Department of Homeland Security has submitted a new proposal to the Federal Register that would update the required entry forms with a question asking for travelers' accounts names on social media.

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“GODLESS” Android malware threatens 90% of devices

“GODLESS” Android malware threatens 90% of devices

Malware isn't something new to smartphone operating systems, especially Android. Sometimes, it's even a point of criticism for Google's platform. There are, however, few exploits, like Stagefright and Heartbleed, that has users, developers, and security researchers scrambling. The new "GODLESS" family of malware, reported by software security firm Trend Micro, seems to be bent on becoming one of those, secretly rooting infected devices and opening them up to further compromise, which is practically any device running Android 5.1 Lollipop or older.

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Apple iOS 10 kernel is unencrypted for performance says Apple

Apple iOS 10 kernel is unencrypted for performance says Apple

Apple recently showed off a preview version of iOS 10 at a developers conference and as developers are wont to do they immediately hacked into the code to see what they could find inside. Many of them were very surprised to find that Apple had left the kernel of the OS unencrypted. Some were surprised enough that they assumed Apple had made a mistake.

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Mark Zuckerberg takes his MacBook security seriously

Mark Zuckerberg takes his MacBook security seriously

A few weeks back we learned that Mark Zuckerberg had his twitter and pinterest accounts hacked. At the time, the hacker group that hacked the accounts claimed that his password was a very simple word "dadada" leading some to assume that the Zuck wasn’t that security conscious. Now an image has turned up that Zuckerberg sent out to celebrate the 500 million active monthly users that Instagram boasts and it appears that Zuckerberg does take some security seriously.

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It’s not paranoia to cover your laptop’s webcam

It’s not paranoia to cover your laptop’s webcam

Mark Zuckerberg may cover his laptop's webcam and microphone with sticky tape, but you don't have to be the billionaire founder of a massively-popular social network to be sensibly cautious about privacy. A photo shared by the Facebook founder this week - celebrating 500 million Instagram users - piqued the attention of eagle-eyed privacy advocates, who spotted a low-tech solution to helping secure Zuckerberg's laptop.

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Google makes two-step verification easier with new prompt

Google makes two-step verification easier with new prompt

Google has made two-step verification easier with a new prompt that simply requires a tap — tap “Deny” to block an attempted sign-in, or tap “Yes, allow sign-in” to approve it. This is optional -- if you really prefer codes, you can still receive them instead. By enabling it, though, getting into your own account, or keeping someone out, is faster than it has ever been.

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Acer hack may have exposed 34,500 customers

Acer hack may have exposed 34,500 customers

Late last week, a letter surfaced detailing a data breach with Acer’s website which left customers’ credit and debit card details vulnerable, among other things. Though the time frame for the breach was stated — May 12 of last year through April 28 of this year — how many people may have been affected wasn’t detailed. Acer has revealed the number this week, though, and it’s substantial: as many as 34,500 customers may have had their banking details stolen.

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The Pentagon expands program for hackers to test its security

The Pentagon expands program for hackers to test its security

Back in March, the US's Department of Defense launched a "Hack the Pentagon" campaign to get hackers to test their websites and security networks for vulnerabilities, without the threat of jail time. The project was so successful that the government agency has announced it's being expanded, including more DoD websites and networks, with further cash incentives for hackers. Think of it like the bug bounty programs that Google, Facebook, and other tech companies offer, except hackers get to put the government's most secure facilities to the test.

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Acer data breach leaves customer credit cards exposed

Acer data breach leaves customer credit cards exposed

Acer has been hit with a data breach, and it is in the process of notifying potentially affected customers. The breach is said to have affected the company’s e-commerce website over a huge time span — May 12, 2015 through April 28, 2016. Anyone who submitted information through the website during that time may have had their data compromised, including things like credit card numbers, names, and addresses.

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Google paid $550,000 in Android bug bounties since last year

Google paid $550,000 in Android bug bounties since last year

How much is the security of your Android device worth? Well, Google spent around $550,000 in bug rewards since it launched the program for Android a year ago. Depending on how you view the platform, that might be more than enough or, in fact, too little. Regardless, Google is even increasing the bounty for "high quality" reports to ensure that Android's security doesn't descend into becoming a joke in the mobile industry. Though some might argue that is already the case anyway.

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