security

Google researchers discover SSL 3.0 bug

Google researchers discover SSL 3.0 bug

We've heard about a lot of bugs this year, not the least of which being the recent "Shellshock" bug. Now Google researchers have discovered a bug in SSL 3.0 that could allow hackers to nab user data. The discovery was detailed today in a report published by the team, which says they were able to breach the protocol using what they call a "POODLE" attack -- Padding Oracle On Downgraded Legacy Encryption attack. With this, they have recommended that SSL 3.0 be disabled to mitigate the problem.

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anonabox: Tor in a box for maximum anonymity and freedom

anonabox: Tor in a box for maximum anonymity and freedom

Some lawmakers and parties have likened the Internet to the Wild Wild West in order to justify putting a clamp on it. For many users, however, that freedom is part and parcel of the Internet's nature and is necessary for it to survive. To help stem off attempts to curtail the freedom of speech on the Internet, not to mention growing number of spying on users, a group of friends have designed anonabox, a discrete and easy to use networking device that could give the NSA nightmares.

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Millions of Dropbox credentials hacked from 3rd party services [UPDATE]

Millions of Dropbox credentials hacked from 3rd party services [UPDATE]

Just when you though Dropbox was in the clear, a storm suddenly rises to dump a rain of worries on the service's millions of users. As much as 7 million usernames and their corresponding passwords have reportedly been accessed, with a few of them "teased" with a pastebin posting. This incident comes shortly on the heels of yesterday's revelation of a bug in Dropbox's desktop client that lead to some data loss. Considering passwords are involved, this new development, however, has more frightening consequences.

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Kmart registers hacked, customers’ credit & debit cards numbers stolen

Kmart registers hacked, customers’ credit & debit cards numbers stolen

Retail chain Kmart has just announced that its in-store payment systems have been compromised for over a month now, and there is a strong chance that customers' credit and debit card numbers have been compromised. Details are still scarce at this point, but it is clear that Kmart joins recent retail victims Target and Home Depot in having their registers affected by malware.

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Blackphone is working on a secure tablet

Blackphone is working on a secure tablet

The world has turned its attention towards the issue of privacy in the digital age, particularly one where the government is known to spy on data through all sorts of insidious and legally dubious means. That reality has prompted many different products tailored towards keeping private data away from prying eyes: encrypted messaging platforms, locked down email services, and, of course, the Blackphone. The folks behind the latter device have revealed to CNBC that a tablet is now in the works.

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The Egg wants to be your personal portable web server

The Egg wants to be your personal portable web server

The folks behind the company Eggcyte are concerned about your privacy, and want to help you maintain it using a different method than most: with a portable personal web server called The Egg. Dubbed such due to its egg-like design, The Egg gives users their own Egg website where they can provide content for others to see and enjoy, sans having to upload to a social network or cloud service. Eggcyte says all of one's personal content and site details are contained with the Egg.

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iOS 8.1 reported to prevent game emulators from working

iOS 8.1 reported to prevent game emulators from working

For once, this isn't actually about Apple actively blocking legally questionable apps from setting up shop in the iTunes App Store right from the start. This is about emulators for popular gaming consoles and handhelds no longer working because the upcoming iOS 8.1 update will finally plug up a vulnerability previously in place that allowed such apps to thrive. While good for security, it leaves users of such gaming apps out in the cold, with no way to get back in to enjoy older games again.

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CoinGuard security system uses quarter-size sensors

CoinGuard security system uses quarter-size sensors

No connected home is complete without a security system of some sort, the likes of which have transformed over the years into something you can monitor from your most convenient mobile device. CoinGuard is one such connected security setup, and though not unique in function, it is notable for the size of its sensors. Staying true to its name, the CoinGuard sensors measure in just a bit bigger than a quarter, making them small enough to tag just about any device in your home, whether it's a door or a cookie jar.

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USB vulnerability “fix” includes using epoxy

USB vulnerability “fix” includes using epoxy

The BadUSB vulnerability first detailed at Black Hat was just recently released to the public after a couple hackers reverse-engineered it and published on Github. That move was believed to be necessary for prodding manufacturers to come up with a solution, but it had the added effect of leaving USB users vulnerable. A patch will be difficult, it is believed, but until then a "fix" for the issue has been published that doesn't so much solve the vulnerability as it does remove certain avenues for infiltration.

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Twitter fights for more transparency, sues DOJ

Twitter fights for more transparency, sues DOJ

Twitter wants you to know what information the Government is looking for. Sadly, they’re bound by restrictions which prevent them from releasing such granular info about requests made of them. In a move that will push the boundaries of transparency, Twitter is taking the U.S. Government to court for the ability to offer that info.

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