security

Verizon: Fear lazy IT staff not smartphone security

Verizon: Fear lazy IT staff not smartphone security

Many of the companies and organizations you trust your personal data to are storing it on unpatched and unprotected servers, Verizon has concluded, with carelessness a key contributor to data breaches. In fact, laziness in applying long-released security patches remains a primary weakness, the company's 2015 report discovered. However while mobile security has become a key talking point by Apple, Google, and others, each pitching their platform as the safest for users, the stats suggest the risk there is "negligible," in fact.

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1Password for Apple Watch arrives (but no Android Wear)

1Password for Apple Watch arrives (but no Android Wear)

Popular password manager 1Password has joined the roster of apps ready for Apple Watch, with the latest update bringing login credentials conveniently to your wrist. The update, 1Password v5.4, hit the App Store today, allowing Pro users to add their Apple Watch - or, at least, they would be able to if Apple had begun shipping the wearable yet - as a trusted device, and pick select accounts to have access to from there.

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Kaspersky tool decrypts files locked by ransomware

Kaspersky tool decrypts files locked by ransomware

Kaspersky is a security company that has teamed up with the Dutch police National High Tech Crime Unit (NHTCU) to offer a tool with the goal of unencrypting files that are encrypted by ransomware. The free tool will unlock files that are encrypted by the ransomware CoinVault. CoinVault is a piece of software that has been going around since November of last year.

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Forget spying, now the NSA wants your password list

Forget spying, now the NSA wants your password list

The NSA isn't interested in a sneaky back door into your smartphone or computer any more, it just wants you to leave the front door wide open. While arguments continue around just what the National Security Agency can and can't get access to - dragging more than one big tech name into the controversy - the spy organization's chief is suggesting a far more blunt approach: in effect, handing over the keys to encryption upfront.

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Anonabox recall has critics saying “I told you so”

Anonabox recall has critics saying “I told you so”

Anonabox has not had a simple life. The little router, which was bid as a security solution to make privacy both effective and simple, was met with backlash from critics who argued that it was not nearly as secure as claimed, and that it suffered from some security flaws. Despite raising a large six-figure sum, Kickstarter ended up canceling its crowdfunding campaign, citing discrepancies in the maker's claims. That didn't keep the box down, however, and it eventually found success elsewhere, only for the end result to be exactly as expected. Flawed.

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Facebook launches primer detailing all things security

Facebook launches primer detailing all things security

Anyone with a social networking account should be mindful not only of what they post on it, but also their security settings -- misunderstanding a particular setting, for example, could lead to info you believed was private actually being visible to the public. Facebook has rolled out features that aim to improve the users' awareness of those security features, including reminders that popup with snippets of information every now and again, and that settings review that rolled out not too long ago. Now it is back with more...a lot more.

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Dyre Wolf malware transfers victims to live operator

Dyre Wolf malware transfers victims to live operator

IBM has detailed a new variation of the Dyre malware, which it is calling "The Dyre Wolf". The malware targets large enterprises, and comes with an unexpected twist: a bit of social engineering involving a live operator posing as a representative. When on the phone with this operator, the hackers on the other side use banking information provided by the victim to initiate a large wire transfer...and in some cases use a DDoS attack to keep the company from discovering the transfer until it is too late.

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Uber hires its first chief security officer

Uber hires its first chief security officer

Uber has hired its first chief security officer, the ridesharing service announced. Says the company, it has been on the prowl for someone to helm its safety and cybersecurity elements, and that someone is Joe Sullivan, who has previously worked at Facebook, eBay, and PayPal, as well as the Department of Justice. Sullivan will be taking up his role at Uber sometime later this month, helping the service to "redefine safety and data security". This announcement comes at a time when many governing authorities and individuals alike have questioned Uber's practices and called into question the issue of driver/rider data security.

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Google to stop recognizing Chinese web security certificates

Google to stop recognizing Chinese web security certificates

Google will stop recognizing web security certificates issued by China's CNNIC (China Internet Network Information Center), it has been announced. This comes at a time when China is cracking down on foreign services in the nation, and tech companies are backing off in return, pulling or otherwise limiting their interactions with China. Google announced yesterday that it would stop recognizing the CNNIC certificates, and the agency has fired back today with a statement saying the move is "difficult to understand and accept".

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Here’s how Google Play scans your Android phone

Here’s how Google Play scans your Android phone

Google has a system enacted through Google Play for Android devices called Verify Apps. Google's latest Android Security State of the Union (for the year 2014) includes clarification on what the company is scanning on your phone - both inside Google Play-downloaded apps and in apps you've downloaded elsewhere. Verify Apps scans your phone's apps for security risks in Google Play apps, and Safety Net provides protection for (and from) apps outside of Google Play. Yes, Google Play is scanning your phone - no, it's not something to freak out about.

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