security

FBI says it may have a way to access shooter’s iPhone

FBI says it may have a way to access shooter’s iPhone

Surprise! The FBI has made a big production of trying to force Apple’s hand in unlocking an iPhone, Apple has waged a big legal battle to keep the government out of its users’ phones, and Snowden has claimed the FBI has been able to unlock the phone all along. It’s a revolving circus of serious litigation and possible precedent-setting court rulings, and it has just presented a big plot twist: the FBI may have just found a way to crack the iPhone, a new court document reveals.

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Apple makes encryption stand: “we will not shrink” insists Cook

Apple makes encryption stand: “we will not shrink” insists Cook

Today at the Apple Town Hall meeting, CEO Tim Cook took the stage after showing off a brief history of the company. They showed 40 years of the company in 40 seconds, which was little more than a quick flash of words such as "Lisa" "1984" "iMac" and more. After letting us know that Apple's 40th birthday was coming up on April 1st, he took a moment to talk about something far more important.

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iOS bug allows hackers access to iMessage photos and videos

iOS bug allows hackers access to iMessage photos and videos

One reason that people like using iMessage is because of the sense of security that it gives. After all, just look at how difficult it's been for the FBI to access the messages from the San Bernardino shooter's phone. But it looks like your iMessages might not be as secure as you think, and Apple is ready to fix the problem later today.

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FTC warns Android developers about apps that monitor users’ TV habits

FTC warns Android developers about apps that monitor users’ TV habits

The US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has issued warnings to a handful of Android app developers using controversial software that could invade users' privacy without their knowledge. Known as "SilverPush," the advertising framework can use an Android device's microphone to listen for television shows in the background, in turn providing third-party advertisers with information on users' viewing habits.

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Rowhammer vulnerability still threatens RAM, even DDR4

Rowhammer vulnerability still threatens RAM, even DDR4

When we speak of security exploits, we usually refer to software that take advantage of vulnerabilities in other software. Rowhammer, however, is a rare breed. Discovered almost exactly a year ago, it involved software exploiting vulnerability in hardware, in this case, dual in-line memory modules or DIMMs, in order to affect a change in software. The exploit had chip makers scrambling to get the latest DDR4 chips out the door. But apparently, the security comforts they offered were based on a presumption that researchers are now proving to be false.

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TeslaCrypt 3 might be the most dangerous ransomware in the wild

TeslaCrypt 3 might be the most dangerous ransomware in the wild

Software developers usually, or at least should, quickly work to patch up security holes that could be exploited to the detriment of their users. It seems almost ironic but also expected that the very same mentality and process would be used by those who write malware in order to plug up the holes in their own software. The end result is, of course, a more robust malware that is even harder to crack and fight. That does seem to be the case with TeslaCrypt 3, the latest version of a ransomware that is now proving to be impossible to crack.

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Apple engineers would rather quit than create an iOS backdoor

Apple engineers would rather quit than create an iOS backdoor

Given the very high profile and tragic circumstances surrounding the San Bernardino case, even some of those siding with Apple's views fear that the government might win this case, opening up a can of worms for the future. But even if it does, the FBI might hit a snag in getting cooperation from Apple's minions. Several Apple employees, both former and current, are already mulling their options should that day come, going as far as considering quitting instead of being forced to break the security they themselves worked hard to strengthen.

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Encrypted ProtonMail opens service to public, mobile apps ready

Encrypted ProtonMail opens service to public, mobile apps ready

The fight between Apple and the Justice Department over the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone has once again put the spotlight on security, privacy, and encryption. The last time that was a hot topic was nearly 3 years ago at the height of the "Snowden Files". Born out of that very same controversy, Swiss encrypted email provider ProtonMail has seen it fit to finally open up its service to the general public, removing the invite-only barricade for individuals and groups to sign up for an end-to-end encrypted secure e-mail service.

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LastPass launches its own Authenticator mobile app

LastPass launches its own Authenticator mobile app

Humans are terrible at keeping things secret. They are even worse at keeping secret keys, like passwords, secret. A whole market of services like LastPass thrives on helping users not only keep passwords safe, they even help users create strong passwords in the first place. But a password alone isn't enough to keep you safe these days, which is why many recommend using two-factor authentication as well. Taking that advice to its natural consequence, LastPass is making available its own Authenticator mobile app in an attempt to convince users to adopt these safety practices.

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Apple amps up the rhetoric in latest response to DOJ

Apple amps up the rhetoric in latest response to DOJ

Apple has just filed a legal response to the Justice Department's response to Apple's response to the court order on behalf of the Justice Department. That simplified yet still confusing chronology of legal filings only shows the circus surrounding the tussle between Apple and government agencies, specifically the FBI, over unlocking the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone. After being on the receiving end of some colorful remarks from the DOJ, Apple's latest legal statement fires back by saying how the Founding Fathers would be appalled by the DOJ's order.

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The top bounty for hacking Chromebooks just doubled

The top bounty for hacking Chromebooks just doubled

Google wants to give you $100,000, and all you have to do is show how insecure its Chromebook is. The company has doubled its top bounty for Chrome OS exploits, having seen no security researchers or experts step forward over the past year to collect the previous prize with a working hack.

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Anonymous to Donald Trump: ‘total war’ arrives April 1st

Anonymous to Donald Trump: ‘total war’ arrives April 1st

April Fools’ Day will bring ‘total war’ against Donald Trump, Anonymous has announced. The collective plans to launch a cyberattack against the candidate, doing so to hamper his presidential bid and what they call a “deeply disturbing” campaign. This isn’t the first time Anonymous has targeted Trump, but does promise to be more severe than the last time, aiming to shut down Trump’s various websites and reveal private information to the public.

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