security

Adobe fixed Flash’s zero-day flaws but it still needs to die

Adobe fixed Flash’s zero-day flaws but it still needs to die

Adobe has pushed out a Flash Player security update to fix the latest critical vulnerability that garnered it attention today. This certainly isn't the first time Adobe has been forced to fix critical problems with its Flash software, but has spurred individuals and companies alike to call for the software's death. This update covers multiple versions of Flash player across a few platforms, but many in the industry still agree: it is time for Adobe to make its Flash Player fade away.

Continue Reading

Firefox browser blocks all vulnerable versions of Flash

Firefox browser blocks all vulnerable versions of Flash

Mozilla, the company behind the Firefox web browser, has announced that it has blocklisted all versions of Flash that are vulnerable to security issues in the Firefox browser. The move comes after numerous security flaws that leave users running Flash vulnerable to hackers have been discovered on the Flash platform. The change to Firefox was announced by Mark Schmidt, the head of Firefox support, via Twitter recently.

Continue Reading

Synaptics announces first self-enclosed fingerprint sensor for laptops

Synaptics announces first self-enclosed fingerprint sensor for laptops

Synaptics has debuted the first fingerprint sensing hardware for laptops and other devices that is completely self-enclosed, or "off the grid" in that it doesn't rely on other parts of a computer when authenticating a fingerprint. The company calls its technology "match-in-sensor," and says it will allow more secure transactions on computers as users get more accustomed password-free logins. By isolating fingerprint authentication, it prevents threats like malware on the computer gaining access to the data.

Continue Reading

iOS 9’s new two-factor authentication ditches annoying Recovery Key

iOS 9’s new two-factor authentication ditches annoying Recovery Key

With the release of iOS 9 Beta 3 to developers this week, Apple has released details on security changes that improve the way users verify their Apple ID from secondary, trusted devices, including better implementation of verification codes and elimination of the annoying Recovery Key. The current system in iOS 8 is known as "two-step verification," while the new version will be called "two-factor authentication." This new system is currently limited to select beta users, will be available to all when iOS 9 launches later this year.

Continue Reading

NY Stock Exchange shuts down for 3 hours due to “technical issue”

NY Stock Exchange shuts down for 3 hours due to “technical issue”

The New York Stock Exchange shuts down entirely as a "technical issue" bogs the system. While it's been suggested by the NYSE that this is not due to any sort of malicious attack, no definitive answer has yet been given for what the technical bug could be. Word from the chairwoman of the Securities and Exchange Commission Mary Jo White says "We are in contact with N.Y.S.E. and are closely monitoring the situation and trading in N.Y.S.E.-listed stocks." This is the second of two issues today, the first having been announced as resolved at 9:37 AM Eastern Standard Time.

Continue Reading

Coders warn that security backdoor will open a can of worms

Coders warn that security backdoor will open a can of worms

The US and UK governments continue to push for a VIP backstage access to the world's computers, networks, and devices, sometimes using the most emotional, not to mention deplorable, arguments. But such a security setup is ultimately a technical consideration and should also be driven by technical arguments. A group of industry specialists and luminaries are doing exactly that, releasing a paper that gives the proposal their stamp of disapproval, proving that not only is the backdoor access unfeasible, it will actually put countries at even more risk.

Continue Reading

Uber deploys security guards to protect its drivers

Uber deploys security guards to protect its drivers

Uber protest have been strong in France, but they're not limited to it. Those protests became violent, with rocks being thrown and tires being set on fire. Similarly a protest happened in South Africa recently, though it was not violent. Instead, it has boiled over into harassement and scare tactics, and some drivers in the region no longer feel safe picking up passengers. As a result the service has hired security in Johannesburg to stand guard at a couple of Uber hotspots.

Continue Reading

Hacking Team leak alleges controversial hack app sales

Hacking Team leak alleges controversial hack app sales

Cybersecurity firm Hacking Team has had an unpleasant taste of its own medicine, after data suggesting connections with repressive regimes was stolen from its systems. Over 400GB of files were unexpectedly shared on the company's hijacked Twitter account - posts since deleted as Hacking Team wrests back control this morning - some of which indicate that, contrary to the Italian firm's express denials, it has been selling monitoring and surveillance software to governments and security services in countries like Kazakstan, Russia, and Bahrain, which have been accused of heavy-handed treatment of citizens.

Continue Reading

Netatmo Welcome Review – Nest Cam’s face-recognizing rival

Netatmo Welcome Review – Nest Cam’s face-recognizing rival

If a smart home is truly smart, it should know who’s inside it. That’s the argument Netatmo makes with its new Welcome camera, promising Dropcam-style streaming video but combined with facial-recognition. At $199 it matches Nest Cam’s sticker, but without the need to cough up for the cloud if you want to look back through captured footage, and Netatmo says its person-spotting skills should cut the number of false-alarms down, too. I put on my most welcoming expression to see if the learning camera would find me memorable.

Continue Reading

Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next