security

90s US “weaker encryption” policy comes back to haunt it

90s US “weaker encryption” policy comes back to haunt it

The US government has been fighting against recent efforts in the tech industry to strengthen security measures, especially against government snooping. In essence, it wants a backdoor into services and devices in order to get access to crucial information it needs to fight crime and terrorism. Apparently, this has been done before and looks like the government needs to take heed from that. A security policy enacted decades ago has found its way back to the US and is compromising the security of secure websites, including some of the government's own.

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Simplicam adds detection zones for fine-tuned home security

Simplicam adds detection zones for fine-tuned home security

When it comes to the ‘Internet of Things’, context is important. Not the context on background of the sensor or item, but context in how it can make the info it’s grabbing make sense. An often overlooked part of your smart, contextual home is the security camera. For DIY home security monitoring, nothing outshines Simplicam. Already a winner due to facial recognition, Simplicam is now offering detection zones, which you can program yourself. Now, you’ll be able to get alerts exactly as you want and need them.

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AVG creates facial recognition blocking glasses

AVG creates facial recognition blocking glasses

Facial recognition software is ubiquitous. From being auto-tagged by facebook to being added to a database of images, we can't control what happens to our likeness once it gets online. These days more data is being extracted from each of our online interactions. Tracking cookies and search history give companies a clear view of your Internet footprint. Most precious of all is your own face. Enter AVG's new concept invisibility glasses which were presented at in Barcelona for the MWC 2015. Once you put them on, you're rendered instantly invisible to facial recognition software.

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Panasonic Nubo wants to kill Dropcam with 4G

Panasonic Nubo wants to kill Dropcam with 4G

Streaming security cameras are great, until your WiFi connection dies and your virtual peephole gets cut off. Enter the Panasonic Nubo, throwing 4G LTE into the mixture along with some smart home ambitions. Panasonic isn’t aiming low, either, claiming the Nubo is a “Dropcam killer” from the outset, and aiming to out-perform everything on the Nest-owned streaming camera’s spec sheet. I caught up with the Panasonic Cameramanager team to find out why Nubo shouldn’t just be on your home office wall, but hitching a ride in your suitcase.

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I jabbed my finger at Qualcomm’s ultrasonic biometrics

I jabbed my finger at Qualcomm’s ultrasonic biometrics

I honestly didn't expect to come to Mobile World Congress and have the moistness of my fingers judged, but it turns out I'm surprisingly dry. Qualcomm brought its new Snapdragon Sense ID 3D Fingerprint Technology to the show, eschewing the capacitive sensors found in the iPhone 6's Touch ID among other home buttons, and instead using ultrasonic scanning. The upside is being able to scan through materials, like glass or metal, and though the days of your entire touchscreen also serving as a biometric log-in panel aren't quite yet upon us, they're not far off. That is, assuming you're damp enough.

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Lenovo makes promise for “Cleaner, Safer PC”

Lenovo makes promise for “Cleaner, Safer PC”

This week Lenovo has released commentary regarding their future in clean, safe PCs. They recently ran into some trouble with their pre-loaded software Superfish, a visual discovery system which aimed to help users find helpful results in searches for items for purchase. Unfortunately for users and for Lenovo, that software wasn't entirely secure, and now Lenovo is working to remove Superfish from all computers, top to bottom. To do this, they've begun offering a free 6-month subscription to McAfee LiveSafe service to those affected by Superfish in the wild.

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Twitter introduces more tools to combat trolls

Twitter introduces more tools to combat trolls

Twitter has been criticized on numerous occasions for how it handles trolls, and it has made a serious effort in recent times to change that. Early this month, for example, a message from Twitter's CEO Dick Costolo surfaced in which he took personal responsibility for the social network's trolling troubles and vowed that Twitter won't be tolerating such abusive users any longer. Fast-forward a couple weeks, and the microblogging service has announced some new tools for combating abusive users, trolls, and other issues.

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Google’s new Chrome warning stops malware before you download

Google’s new Chrome warning stops malware before you download

As long as the internet has existed - and indeed before - there've been viruses. Malware - malicious software - has been a plague on the digital universe since inception, and Google hopes to help to put and end to it. With a new red flag set in place this month, Google Chrome will warn you when you're about to visit a website that has malware downloads. This is not the first such system Google has put in place, but it is the most advanced.

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First lawsuit filed against Lenovo for Superfish adware

First lawsuit filed against Lenovo for Superfish adware

Things are getting serious for Lenovo, as the first lawsuit from their Superfish spyware scandal has been filed in a California court by Jessica Bennett. This is the first lawsuit in what may be a series of legal troubles for Lenovo. This different from run-of-the-mill adware that one might find from a scheduled virus check. Lenovo has been caught putting pre-installed adware from a company called Superfish on their products. This was exceptionally dangerous to Lenovo consumers because it not only leaked their data but left them vulnerable to outside attacks.

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Security software makers found to be using Superfish engine

Security software makers found to be using Superfish engine

It seems like Superfish is still one hot fish even after Lenovo has admitted its lapses in addressing the rather eerie security situation. Discovery of Superfish and Komodia, the software company that makes it all possible, has led researchers to look for other traces of the software and the results they ran into are rather shocking. It's almost acceptable that adware would make use of something like Komodia, but for software that are designed to actually keep users safe from phishing and spoofing is almost unbelievable.

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