security

Samsung promises patch for Galaxy keyboard hack

Samsung promises patch for Galaxy keyboard hack

Samsung will push out a software fix for the recently-identified keyboard hack, patching at least some of the affected Galaxy smartphones. The new security policy will be first released for KNOX-enabled Samsung devices, though Samsung maintains that there have been no reported cases of the exploit being carried out in the wild. The company is also working with third-party keyboard providers, like SwiftKey, to make sure future gaps in security aren't left open.

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Canadian government websites hit with cyberattack

Canadian government websites hit with cyberattack

Following disclosure of a massive breach of government data in the United States (and a second breach), word has surfaced that the Canadian government has undergone its own cyberattack. The attack targeted Canadian government websites and email systems, having been a denial of service attack against the nation's gc.ca server. The cyberattack was confirmed by Treasury Board President Tony Clement, and it affected several agencies in the nation’s government, including the websites of its Transport, Justice, Foreign Affairs, Industry, Employment, and Labor departments.

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Nest Cam adds 1080p and new stand to Dropcam

Nest Cam adds 1080p and new stand to Dropcam

Nest has revealed its latest product, Nest Cam, a streaming security camera. First fruit of the company's Dropcam acquisition back in June 2014, the new camera bears a distinct resemblance to models like the Dropcam Pro, with a rounded top section atop a newly-slimmed stand that also offers wall-mounting. Inside, there's 1080p video support along with both WiFi and Bluetooth connectivity.

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SwiftKey hack can remotely take over Samsung mobile devices

SwiftKey hack can remotely take over Samsung mobile devices

Android users on Samsung mobile devices could be vulnerable to a new type of security hack. The security flaw was discovered by Ryan Welton from NowSecure. He detailed his findings at the Blackhat Security Summit in London. The hackable exploit arises from the pre-installed SwiftKey keyboard. As Swiftkey searches for updates to its language packs over unencrypted lines, via plain text, it is susceptible to malicious security apps from any spoofed proxy server. Using this as a keyhole, Welton could scale up the attack to basically take over a vulnerable mobile device while the user remains unaware. The bug affects over 600 million Samsung users, including those using the Galaxy S6.

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LastPass reveals breach that compromised user data

LastPass reveals breach that compromised user data

LastPass has revealed that it was breached recently, and that some account data was compromised as a result. The discovery was made this past Friday when, says LastPass, it found (and subsequently blocked) “suspicious activity” on its network. Encrypted user vault data doesn’t seem to have been taken, says LastPass, and there's also no sign that users' accounts were accessed. Some details pertaining to them, however, like email addresses were compromised, and so users need to update their master passwords among other things.

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New security technology allows emoji for passwords

New security technology allows emoji for passwords

Imagine instead of having to type four digits as a security PIN, you could just type the sunglasses smiley, blue heart, top hat, and thumbs up emoji? Well, new security software from the UK's Intelligent Environments could soon allow just that. The company says they have developed a system that would allow symbols, namely emoji, to be used instead of numbers in a PIN code. This makes PINs easier to remember, but, even better, data shows they can actually be more secure than just digits.

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US Navy caught soliciting for 0-day security bugs

US Navy caught soliciting for 0-day security bugs

The US government seems to really have a thing about backdoors, which doesn't sound good whether or not you have an overactive mind. It is almost understandable that the CIA and the NSA and the FBI would want such kind of access to software, but now even the Navy seems to be in on the scheme. Advocacy group Electronic Frontier Foundation or EFF discovered that the Navy posted, and later took down, an online solication that, in essence, was trying to buy zero or N day security bugs from widely used software.

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Amazon patents ear-scanning technology for unlocking smartphones

Amazon patents ear-scanning technology for unlocking smartphones

Forget typing in a four-digit code, or drawing a specific shape as a passcode, and even using your fingerprint to unlock your smartphone. Amazon thinks that the next great way to secure your digital device is by scanning the shape of you ear. The company has just received a patent for technology that would scan your ear with a phone's front-facing camera, unlocking it as you hold the device to the side of your face when answering a call.

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US officials reveal second massive hack: security clearance forms grabbed

US officials reveal second massive hack: security clearance forms grabbed

The recent hack of government data, at least according to those who know of the matter, is far worse than previously revealed. At least 4 million people were comprised, it was originally reported, but a recent letter to the OPM indicated that every single federal employee might have had some data stolen, including former federal workers. Now a second hack has been disclosed by sources, and it is said to have involved the theft of data related to intelligence employees and military personnel.

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FCC urges carriers to turn on kill switch by default

FCC urges carriers to turn on kill switch by default

It looks like the kill switch debates will be back in business again. FCC chair Tom Wheeler has come out once again to call on the wireless industry to arms against smartphone theft. And his favorite solution, which is a point of contention for many players in the smartphone industry, is the kill switch. And again, Wheeler urges carriers to make that feature "opt out" instead of the current "opt in", meaning it should be turned on by default in all cases instead of the optional status quo.

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