security

UK investigation finds Huawei isn’t a security threat

UK investigation finds Huawei isn’t a security threat

Huawei, along with ZTE, has previously been a source of concern for western governments, many of whom have expressed worry that the Chinese company could be performing surveillance for the Chinese government. That has led to use of its hardware being banned in some places, and probes into whether Huawei hardware has been compromised. Back in 2013, Huawei revealed that it would be launching an R&D facility in the United Kingdom, and that resulted in an investigation into the matter. It has been quite a while since then, and the result is in Huawei's favor.

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UK Safari users now able to sue Google over cookies

UK Safari users now able to sue Google over cookies

Safari users in the UK have won the right to sue Google. The judgement, which potentially paves the way for a series of lawsuits, comes about as the result of the Court of Appeals, where Google was fighting the case being heard at all. a group of users claim Google was bypassing Apple’s privacy settings for Safari and installing ‘cookies’ meant to track their Internet activity. While plaintiffs applaud the ruling, Google is “disappointed with the court's decision.”

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Installer Hijacking affects almost half of Android devices

Installer Hijacking affects almost half of Android devices

Android has a reputation for having a more open platform and ecosystem than, say, iOS, but, sadly, it is probably also notorious for sometimes being too open to malware as well. Of course, like any other software, it has its own fair share of vulnerabilities, but given its popularity and reach, sometimes those can be quite frightening. Take for example this "Android Installer Hijacking" technique that hails back from 2014, which could install malware on a user's Android device, naturally without the user being aware of it.

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Your Twitch account has been locked-down: Here’s why

Your Twitch account has been locked-down: Here’s why

If you’ve been trying to log-in to your Twitch account and found it to be more difficult than normal, there’s a really good reason for that. According to a quick blog post on Twitch’s website, there “may have been unauthorized access to some Twitch user account information.” Until the post, Twitch was calling the issue an “internal tech issue”. It’s not known what was affected, but Twitch is on lockdown until further notice. You can still get in, but expect unique visits to require a password.

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TrackR bravo hands-on – Tracking with Bluetooth and the crowd

TrackR bravo hands-on – Tracking with Bluetooth and the crowd

Where are your keys? How about your cat? Personal locator devices have come a long way since the days of "whistle and your keychain bleeps," and TrackR is hoping to lead the charge with its new sub-$30 bravo dongle. Aiming to not only allow users to leave their smartphone to keep track of their belongings, rather than forcing them to memorize where they last saw everything, but to also rope in the power of crowdsourcing to replace costly GPS, TrackR bravo is a 2014 Indiegogo success that's finally shipping today. It's been dangling from my belongings for the past few weeks; read on for some first-impressions.

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Windows 10 might not peacefully coexist with other OS

Windows 10 might not peacefully coexist with other OS

It seems that Microsoft is developing a pattern lately. After a flood of good news comes the fine print and some sad, if not worrying, follow ups. First it was the speculation that the lure of a free Windows 10 upgrade for pirated copies of Windows might not be so sweet after all. Now it seems that Microsoft will potentially ostracize another group of computer users: those who dual boot operating systems. Slides from its presentation in China seem to hint that Microsoft won't block OEM's from prohibiting users from disabling secure boot.

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Android rolling out ‘on-body detection’ smart lock feature

Android rolling out ‘on-body detection’ smart lock feature

Google appears to rolling out a new lock feature to certain Android 5.0 and up devices, a new spin on biometric security dubbed "on-body detection." Imagine that situation where you unlock your phone to read an email, finish and put it back in your pocket, only to take it out again 20 seconds later to check something else. On-body detection's purpose is to free you from repeatedly unlocking your phone as long as it remains in your hand or pocket.

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Bulgari Diagono Magnesium watch focuses on security

Bulgari Diagono Magnesium watch focuses on security

This year's BaselWorld in Switzerland has become the stage for many companies, watch makers or otherwise, to reveal their own take on the idea of smart devices on your wrist. Some have completely jumped on the smartwatch bandwagon while other cautiously remain on the periphery, like the new Swiss Horological Smartwatch group and their MotionX activity tracker platform. Jeweler Bulgari is making yet another twist, calling its concept device not a smartwatch but an "intelligent watch", one that practically keeps a safety vault on your wrist instead.

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FREAK security hole: Passwords on Android and iOS apps at risk

FREAK security hole: Passwords on Android and iOS apps at risk

At first, we thought the FREAK security vulnerability was isolated to Internet browsers. Then, it became clear that Windows OS is vulnerable to FREAK attacks. The latest news is that this problem is now able to affect smartphones and mobile devices through apps on Android and iOS. The FREAK vulnerability is a security backdoor created by an old Clinton administration era government policy which required all exported software and hardware to have weak encryption keys. Obviously their policy was passed without much foresight. FREAK attacks cripple HTTPS security, allowing for sensitive data like passwords and credit card information to be snatched by hackers savvy to the susceptibility.

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IP Box hardware used to bruteforce screenlock on iOS devices

IP Box hardware used to bruteforce screenlock on iOS devices

Word of an interesting device that can certainly be put to work for nefarious deeds has turned up that makes it easy for someone else to bruteforce the screenlock passcode on iOS devices. The device is called the IP Box and is apparently being used in the phone repair market now. The IP Box is inexpensive at around £200 and connects directly to the USB connection of the iOS device.

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