Science

New electronic implant softens, grips at body temp

New electronic implant softens, grips at body temp

Electronic implants could be used in a variety of ways in the future, most notably being within the field of medicine, where they could provide novel ways to address difficult problems. A consistent problem with the use of electronic implants has been their unforgiving solid nature, something addressed by a team of researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas and the University of Tokyo.

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It’s too late: No stopping melting glaciers says NASA

It’s too late: No stopping melting glaciers says NASA

Glacial melting in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is past the point of no return, NASA has revealed, with research spanning forty years indicating there's now nothing we can do to prevent their demise. The study, carried out in collaboration with the University of California, Irvine, makes ominous predictions about just how significantly the water currently frozen in the ice sheets will contribute to rising sea levels: enough in total, NASA says, to bring the global sea level up by four feet.

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Crushed 6.2 miles underwater: Robo-sub lost at crazy depths

Crushed 6.2 miles underwater: Robo-sub lost at crazy depths

A moment of silence for a fallen explorer: one of the few submarines capable of exploring depths greater than six miles has been destroyed in action, with the unmanned Nereus sub believed to have imploded under the vast pressures of the Kermadec Trench. Neureus, built by the Deep Submergence Lab at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), had already navigated the deepest point in the ocean, Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench, spending ten hours at depths as great as 35,768 feet.

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Rare and bizarre megamouth shark caught and cut up

Rare and bizarre megamouth shark caught and cut up

An incredibly rare megamouth shark has been caught in Japan, a deep water species with a distinctly disproportionately scaled body, of which fewer than 100 sightings have been recorded. The shark - so named because of its huge head, far larger than you'd expect in size given the rest of the body - measured around 13 feet in length, and was the subject of a public autopsy by the Marine Science Museum of Shiuoka, Japan.

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Three months and 13bn years: Birth of the Universe simulated

Three months and 13bn years: Birth of the Universe simulated

The way the universe evolved in the moments right after the Big Bang has been modeled in the most accurate simulation so far, with supercomputers working for a solid three months to crunch the calculations. The model, developed by a research team led by MIT, not only looks at how 41,416 different galaxies formed from dark matter, but goes on to make new predictions about how the raw ingredients are distributed through space.

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Science adding new element 117 to Periodic Table

Science adding new element 117 to Periodic Table

Element Z=117 has been acknowledged this week by a team of scientists, these scientists having successfully created several atoms of said element in a lab. This lovely piece of creation will - once it’s finalized - be element 117, for now it’s code-named Ununseptium. Final confirmation will need to be independently carried out - you can’t just jump in after 3 years of research and declare a new element, after all.

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A bus-sized asteroid buzzed Earth (with just days notice)

A bus-sized asteroid buzzed Earth (with just days notice)

Funding for asteroid detection and the need for greater awareness of potentially dangerous space rocks has been sparked again, after astronomers caught sight of a bus-sized asteroid headed closer to Earth than the moon's orbit only days before it passed. 2014 HL129 came within 186,000 miles of us in the early hours of Saturday morning, NASA's Asteroid Watch project confirmed, having only spotted the roughly 25 foot wide rock the previous Wednesday.

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