Science

This Tetris runs on a giant home-built “megaprocessor” computer

This Tetris runs on a giant home-built “megaprocessor” computer

Creating a Tetris game to be played on the side of a Seattle skyscraper is undoubtedly a huge undertaking, but that's relatively easy for a company with resources and ready-made components at its disposal. On the other hand, creating a Tetris game to be played on a computer built from scratch to resemble a blown up microprocessor probably takes the cake. It's also insanely hard too. But that's exactly what James Newman from Cambridge has accomplished. Both creating what he calls a "megaprocessor" and using it for what it does best: playing Tetris.

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‘Superbug’ bacteria found in Rio’s water raises Olympics concerns

‘Superbug’ bacteria found in Rio’s water raises Olympics concerns

As if there aren’t already enough concerns about the Rio Olympics, a team of scientists from Brazil have announced that a drug-resistant ‘superbug’ bacteria has been found at popular beach destinations in the region. The news is troublesome for many reasons, not the least of which is the 2016 Olympic Games planned for the city this summer which will bring in hundreds of thousands of visitors, potentially exposing them to the drug-resistant bacteria.

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World’s largest radio telescope completed in China

World’s largest radio telescope completed in China

For the last half decade, researchers in China have been at work on a gigantic radio telescope hailed as the world's largest single dish radio telescope. That monster telescope completed construction on July 3, 2016 with the installation of the last of its 4,450 reflecting panels. The telescope is equivalent in size to 30 soccer fields and is called the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope or FAST.

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Juno probe is finally in orbit around Jupiter

Juno probe is finally in orbit around Jupiter

Five years after it left our home, the Juno probe, aptly named after the Roman queen of the gods, has finally entered Jupiter's orbit. Although it is but a means to the probe's ultimate goal, which is, of course, studying the biggest planet in the solar system, the fact that it got to that point in one piece is nothing short of a scientific and engineering miracle. Presuming it survives the next 20 months, Juno will be able to amass a wealth of scientific data that will hopefully give further insight not only into the nature of the giant but into the origins of our solar system itself.

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Study: marijuana reduces plaque, inflammation related to Alzheimer’s

Study: marijuana reduces plaque, inflammation related to Alzheimer’s

The THC and some other compounds found in marijuana have been found effective in treating many ailments, and past studies have found signs that it may be helpful in preventing Alzheimer's disease, as well. Research has indicated that marijuana reduces inflammation in the brain which may contribute to dementia and Alzheimer's, and a recent study found that it also helps strip away the plaque found in the brain of Alzheimer's patients.

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The Ozone layer healing itself is good news for the fight against Climate Change

The Ozone layer healing itself is good news for the fight against Climate Change

Earlier today, we heard that the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica is in the beginning stages of healing. The reason we're seeing this reversal seems largely due to the Montreal Protocol, which banned the use of CFCs in 1987. For those who don't know, CFCs release chlorine atoms when they're hit by ultraviolent light, which eats away at the ozone layer and is the reason the hole over Antartica grows during the continent's summer months and shrinks during the winter. This is not only great news for the environment, but it's also an encouraging development for the efforts against climate change.

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Rosetta will end its mission by crashing into comet on September 30

Rosetta will end its mission by crashing into comet on September 30

The European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission, which involves a probe orbiting Comet 67P (also known as Churyumov-Gerasimenko), will finally be coming to an end after 12 years of study. The space agency has scheduled September 30th as the spacecraft's last, where it will make a controlled crash into the surface of its partnering space rock. Think of it like a viking funeral, but only for a space probe.

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Antarctic ozone layer hole shrinks by 4 million kilometers

Antarctic ozone layer hole shrinks by 4 million kilometers

Scientists at MIT and other locations have been eyeing the hole in the ozone layer since it came to the forefront in the '80s. The fear when the hole in the ozone layer was first discovered was that it might lead to harm for humans around the world since we need the ozone layer to protect us from all sorts of deadly things that come from space. The good news is that scientists have announced that the ozone layer hole has shrunk significantly since 2000.

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Ancient tombs may have served as telescopes for rituals

Ancient tombs may have served as telescopes for rituals

Ancient stone tombs in Portugal may have served as a sort of telescope to enhance one’s ability to see stars for ritualistic purposes. The tombs are 6,000 years old and made of stone, and they feature a peculiarly lengthy but low-height entrance. As well, researchers believe they may have found the particular star these ‘telescopes’ were aimed at: Aldebaran, a bright red star located in the Taurus constellation.

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DJI and Measure team up to tackle commercial drone space

DJI and Measure team up to tackle commercial drone space

Drones are becoming more commonplace in everyday life, but aside from private and military application of drones, commercial enterprises are also increasing their use of the technology. Recognizing that this is the perfect opportunity to corner a growing market, drone maker DJI and Measure, which is pegged as the nation's leading operator of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have announced a new partnership, with their sights set directly on the commercial drone space.

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LG reveals textile pressure sensors that bend and fold

LG reveals textile pressure sensors that bend and fold

While its rival is still obsessing over bendable and foldable mobile devices, LG is working on something somewhat more traditional but still groundbreaking. Its Innotek "cutting edge materials" manufacturing arm has unveiled a new type of textile that can sense pressure across its whole surface. And since its textile, it can be bended and folded in any which way, making it a suitable material for clothing and accessories for use in medical, health, and even automotive industries.

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Ancient pay stub reveals worker was paid with beer

Ancient pay stub reveals worker was paid with beer

A 5,000-year-old clay tablet is the oldest known pay stub in the world, and it has revealed an interesting relationship between one ancient worker and his boss: the worker was paid with beer. The pay stub was discovered in what is now modern day Iraq, and it is written in cuneiform, appearing to be a gibberish of lines and chicken scratch to most of us. A trained eye, though, will see a person with his head leaned toward a bowl and another container with a shape that indicates beer, as well as marks that show how much beer the worker got for his labor.

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