Science

In climate change fight, record high temperatures for 2016 surprise scientists

In climate change fight, record high temperatures for 2016 surprise scientists

There's some discouraging news concerning the fight against climate change today, as scientists with the World Meteorological Organization's climate research arm are saying that the record high temperatures we've seen so far this year are coming as something of a surprise to them. Though they predicted to see increasing temperatures this year, it would appear that the highs we've been experiencing have exceeded expectations, and that may have some worrying implications for the rate at which the climate is changing.

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MIT lithium-oxygen battery lasts a long time and is more efficient

MIT lithium-oxygen battery lasts a long time and is more efficient

MIT has announced a breakthrough in battery technology that might one day mean EVs that can drive further on a charge and gadgets that last longer away from an outlet. For a long time MIT and other research organizations have been looking at lithium-air batteries, but those batteries have some significant drawbacks. While lithium-air promises high-energy output compared to weight, they waste much of the power introduced as heat and performance degrades quickly. The new MIT lithium-oxygen battery overcomes these big drawbacks.

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Spider silk microstructure found to have unique acoustic properties

Spider silk microstructure found to have unique acoustic properties

Researchers have learned another thing about spider silk, and as with past discoveries, it may lead to the development of new materials for use among humans. This time around, a group of researchers from Rice University and beyond busied themselves with studying the microstructure of spider webs, doing so to learn how they transmit phonons — that is, quasiparticles of sound. As it turns out, spider silk possesses something called a phonon band gap.

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Tiny Microbots can deliver drugs and perform medical operations

Tiny Microbots can deliver drugs and perform medical operations

Scientists from the EPFL and ETHZ have worked together to create some very interesting medical microbots that are tiny enough to be introduced into the human body to perform specific tasks. These tiny robots are being studied as a way to treat a variety of diseases and are designed to enter the body and deliver drugs at a specific location or to perform precise operations like clearing clogged arteries.

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Russian AI development could mean machines that understand emotion

Russian AI development could mean machines that understand emotion

Russian scientists are reportedly approaching a significant breakthrough in the realm of artificial intelligence. The scientists claim to be approaching a major development that would create machines that are capable of understanding human emotions. The claim comes from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI Cybernetics Department Prof. Alexi Samsonovich.

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Titanium-gold alloy makes ultra-hard artificial joints

Titanium-gold alloy makes ultra-hard artificial joints

Researchers have developed a new type of alloy that is said to be four times harder than most type of steel, the end goal being artificial joints that are harder and more durable. In the present day, titanium is the preferred type of metal for these artificial joints. In the future, though, a titanium-gold alloy may be used instead, with the mixture being about three parts titanium to one part gold. The alloy is four times harder than titanium.

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NASA puts Groot and Rocket Raccoon on official space station patch

NASA puts Groot and Rocket Raccoon on official space station patch

Groot and Rocket Raccoon, the talking racoon and tree from Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy, are becoming a part of official NASA history. The pair have been chosen by space agency to adorn this year's mission patch for the International Space Station's National Laboratory. The adorable patch was revealed by the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) at San Diego Comic-Con.

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New NASA Goddard video shows one year time-lapse of Earth from space

New NASA Goddard video shows one year time-lapse of Earth from space

There have been a lot of developments concerning space lately, whether we're talking about the study of exoplanets or catching glimpses of protoplanetary disks around young stars. Sometimes, though, it's nice to be reminded of back home, our pale blue dot that is floating through this same universe that offers so much in the way of scientific discovery. A new video from NASA Goddard is doing just that, using photos from the EPIC camera on NOAA's DSCOVR satellite.

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Curiosity rover can now choose some targets autonomously

Curiosity rover can now choose some targets autonomously

Now that the Curiosity rover has been cruising around on the surface of Mars for a long time, NASA is giving the machine the ability to choose some of its own targets for more study. Curiosity is now able to select rocks to target its laser spectrometer on autonomously. NASA says that this is the first time that an instrument of this kind has been autonomously operated on any robotic planetary mission.

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Humans adapted to survive car wrecks are terrifying

Humans adapted to survive car wrecks are terrifying

Imagine if humans evolved in such a way that we could better handle being in a car crash. It would involve some big changes, as you can imagine; necks, spines, and ribs are particularly vulnerable and often injured in car wrecks, for example. Thanks to a trio of industrious folks, we get a glimpse at what one of those evolved humans may look like. Hint: it’s horrifying. Apparently to withstand car crashes, humans will need to transform into a real-life Juggernaut.

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Researchers map another 180 areas of the human brain

Researchers map another 180 areas of the human brain

A research project funded by the National Institutes of Health has identified 180 new distinct areas of the human brain, specifically of the brain’s outer mantle. According to the NIH, this number is more than double that of the previously mapped brain areas. In addition to identifying these new regions, the researchers behind it also created a new type of software able to find each of these areas’ ‘fingerprints’ automatically, doing so using brain scans.

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NASA study shows global surface temps are setting records in 2016

NASA study shows global surface temps are setting records in 2016

NASA is continuing to conducting its studies on two key indicators of surface temperatures around the globe. Those two key indicators are global surface temperatures and Arctic sea ice extent. According to NASA during the first half of 2016, each of the six months set a record as the warmest respective month globally. Those records are compared to when the modern global temperature recording began in 1880.

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