Science

An Ephemeral Tattoo isn’t forever, unless you want it to be

An Ephemeral Tattoo isn’t forever, unless you want it to be

Tattoos are forever. Well, you can get rid of them with costly laser treatment, but otherwise, that ink isn't going anywhere. Most people are pretty happy with the knowledge that the artwork they paid for will be with them forever. However, for those that don't want something that will last for the rest of their life, there may be a new option.

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Mercury Transit sets planet against our sun

Mercury Transit sets planet against our sun

This morning the planet Mercury passed between our planet and our Sun, allowing us to see its silhouette with clarity. This is one of about 13 times the planet passes between ours and the sun per century - the last time this happened, you probably didn't have a smartphone - back in 2006. The image you see above comes from NASA and was captured by Bill Ingalls. NASA has also provided a time-lapse video showing the passing of the planet across the face of our sun.

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Invisible ‘second skin’ blocks UV rays, may help treat skin diseases

Invisible ‘second skin’ blocks UV rays, may help treat skin diseases

Researchers have developed a polymer they call a ‘second skin,’ and it could one day be used to apply medication directly to a person's skin or to protect against UV exposure, among other things. The polymer comes from Olivo Labs, a company that focuses on creating proprietary biomaterials for use in the dermatological field. Researchers call their new polymer ‘XPL,’ and say it offers the same mechanical properties as “youthful [real] skin."

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New blood glucose monitor replaces finger pricks with microwaves

New blood glucose monitor replaces finger pricks with microwaves

The future holds a lot of promise for diabetics, not the least of which is because of the more advanced glucose monitors researchers have been creating. There's the Patch monitor, a band-like wearable that sticks on the skin to keep track of sugar levels. Similar but suitably different is a new contraption created by researchers at Cardiff University's School of Engineering -- a small device that attaches to the skin and uses microwaves instead of finger pricks to check sugar levels.

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Mount St. Helens’ recent earthquakes are nothing to fear

Mount St. Helens’ recent earthquakes are nothing to fear

Small earthquakes that have recently taken place near Mouth St. Helens, a volcano that erupted in 1980 and caused a few dozen deaths, have stirred up concern among those who worry another eruption may happen in the near future. Put those fears to rest, folks -- there's nothing to worry about. Researchers say there is no sign the volcano will blow anytime soon, and that so-called 'earthquake swarms' have happened in the recent past.

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Disney Research team uses electromagnetic signals to identify gadgets

Disney Research team uses electromagnetic signals to identify gadgets

Disney researchers have created a system for identifying different gadgets based on radio frequency emission (“system noise”); the system is precise enough that it can tell apart two visually identical items. Called EM-ID, the name references electromagnetic signals produced by smartphones, laptops, and similar electronic devices; the identification process is also able to tell the difference between classes of items, such as distinguishing power tools from computers.

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USGS releases first ever global topographical map of Mercury

USGS releases first ever global topographical map of Mercury

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has released the first-ever global topographical map of Mercury, something that was made in conjunction with Arizona State University, Carnegie Institute of Washington, Johns Hopkins University, NASA, and the Applied Physics Laboratory. The topographical map, as one would expect, includes details on things like tectonic landforms, craters, and volcanoes, and is high-res enough for those future road trips across the galaxy.

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Ancient ‘hammerhead’ reptile found in southern China

Ancient ‘hammerhead’ reptile found in southern China

In Southern China, researchers discovered fossils of a reptile that features a ‘hammerhead’ snout — a very wide, somewhat comical jaw that extends beyond the diameter of its own head. The fossils are 242 million years old, and they belong to a creature dubbed Atopodentatus unicus, a reptile that would feed on algae and lived in the sea. The fossils were first discovered in 2014, but the discovery was only made public today.

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NASA makes 56 patents public domain, launches searchable database

NASA makes 56 patents public domain, launches searchable database

NASA has released a bunch of patents for its technologies so that anyone can use them. A total of 56 “formerly-patented” technologies developed by the government are now available in the public domain, meaning they can be used for commercial purposes in an unrestricted manner. To make it easier to find these technologies and others like them, NASA has also created a new searchable database that links the public to thousands of the agency’s now-expired patents.

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Newly discovered stick insect is world’s longest at over half a meter

Newly discovered stick insect is world’s longest at over half a meter

The bug you're seeing here is no doubt creepy as hell, but it also happens to be a new species of stick insect, and one that is now believed to be the world's longest insect in general. Discovered in China in 2014 in the Guangxi Zhuang region, scientists say it belongs to the Phryganistria genus, and measures an incredible 62.4 centimeters long.

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Australian study sees no link between cell phones and brain cancer

Australian study sees no link between cell phones and brain cancer

Someone called Derva Davis made waves across Australia earlier this year with an alarmist campaign to convince people that cities where cell phone use was high had greater incidences of disease such as brain cancer. Now a researcher who was at the time working on a research paper specifically looking at the link between mobile phone use in Australia and brain cancer has published his paper and is able to talk about the results.

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SpaceX didn’t fail at landing a rocket at sea after all

SpaceX didn’t fail at landing a rocket at sea after all

Some recommend your expectations low so that you will be pleasantly surprised when you succeed but won't take it too hard when you fail. That might not be the reasoning behind SpaceX's less than enthusiastic outlook as it launched another Falcon 9 to put the JCSAT-14 commercial communications satellite into orbit. It already set a low probability for making a safe sea landing this time around because of the specifics of this mission. Well, guess what? SpaceX nailed it yet again. So yes, it successfully landed another rocket at sea.

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