Science

Juno’s first image of Jupiter shows the red spot and moons

Juno’s first image of Jupiter shows the red spot and moons

Juno arrived in orbit around Jupiter on July 4 and a few days later the spacecraft was snapping images of the planet and its moons. The very first image that the spacecraft took after going into orbit has been shared by NASA and it's an image showing roughly half of Jupiter and a trio of the planet's moons. In the image along with Jupiter are Io, Europa, and Ganymede.

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Study: monkeys in Brazil used stone tools 700 years ago

Study: monkeys in Brazil used stone tools 700 years ago

Capuchin monkeys used stone tools to open cashews 700 years ago, according to a new study from the University of Oxford, and it may just be the tip of a larger discovery about monkeys and tool usage. While that discovery itself isn’t that big of a deal — past studies have found evidence of monkeys using tools — it is notable because of the region in which these tools were found: Brazil. In past studies of this sort, the evidence for monkey tool usage has been found in parts of Asia and Africa.

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Curiosity rover resumes full functionality after going into safe mode

Curiosity rover resumes full functionality after going into safe mode

Earlier this month, NASA's Curiosity rover, which is currently prowling the surface of our neighbor Mars, went into safe mode for an unknown reason. Though NASA scientists weren't exactly sure why Curiosity went into safe mode, it has been announced that the rover resumed full functionality as of July 9. Since then, scientists have been working to find the reason for the mishap, and now they're saying they have a good idea of what happened.

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Ceres may hold ice deposits in permanently shadowed regions

Ceres may hold ice deposits in permanently shadowed regions

The search for water in our solar system is one that hasn't turned up too many results, but scientists may have a lead on water in a rather unlikely place. According to new research, the dwarf planet Ceres has spots on its surface that are permanently dark, and could therefore remain cold enough to trap water ice and keep it at stable temperatures.

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Researchers find evidence of water clouds beyond our solar system

Researchers find evidence of water clouds beyond our solar system

Researchers have discovered evidence of water clouds beyond our solar system for the first time, it has been announced, and they were found in an unlikely place: the cold brown dwarf star WISE 0855. The dwarf was first discovered in 2014, and it is relatively close to our own planet, being only 7.2 lightyears away. Most notably, WISE 0855 is the coldest object humans have yet discovered beyond our solar system, and it is so dim researchers have to use need infrared technologies to see it.

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Stingray robot is part rat heart and part breast implant sprinkled with gold

Stingray robot is part rat heart and part breast implant sprinkled with gold

Scientists and researchers around the world are working on tiny robots that use organic cells in their construction. The latest such robot device to use organic sells is the soft robotic stingray you see in the image here. This contraption is able to move under its own power by flapping its stingray-like wings and it's made using rat cardiac cells.

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Neanderthal cannibalism evidence found in Belgium

Neanderthal cannibalism evidence found in Belgium

A cave in Belgium has produced remains with signs of cannibalism among Neanderthals in the region, according to a new study. The bones were found in the Troisieme cavern in Goyet; it is the largest cache of Neanderthal bones found in Northern Europe, and it comprises four adults and one child. Of these remains, about 30-percent of the bones are broken in a way that would have been used to extract marrow and they show cut marks from tools that only human could wield.

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Exoplanet has three suns and takes 550 years for a single orbit

Exoplanet has three suns and takes 550 years for a single orbit

Scientists have discovered an exoplanet far, far from the Earth that has a unique solar system. The planet is called HD 131399Ab and it is dubbed the widest ranging exoplanet in a mutli star system. That is a fancy way of saying that this planet lives in a solar system where there are three suns and it has a massive orbit. How massive is that orbit you ask- about 500 times larger than the Earth's.

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Researchers store 200MB of data on molecular strands

Researchers store 200MB of data on molecular strands

Microsoft and researchers from the University of Washington have set a new record and reached a milestone in DNA storage. The team has been able to store 200MB of data on the molecular strands of DNA. Just as interesting as setting a new record for data capacity is the fact that the stored data took up a tiny amount of space described as "much smaller than the tip of a pencil."

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U.S. Navy funds bomb-sniffing bugs research

U.S. Navy funds bomb-sniffing bugs research

The human sense of smell isn't that great, and so humans have largely relegated the task of sniffing out items -- non-pungent drugs, hidden bombs, missing people -- to dogs. Dogs are great at what they do, but they pose some issues, as well. For one thing, training bomb-sniffing dogs is expensive. In addition, a dog can alert to something but it can't break down what it smells or give us any details. Bugs though? They may be the solution.

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Pale eel-like fish spotted alive in deep sea waters for the first time

Pale eel-like fish spotted alive in deep sea waters for the first time

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has released a video showing a living, pale, “ghostly” fish; this is the first time the creature has been found alive, marking a new milestone discovery for the agency. The fish was found by the NOAA Okeanos Explorer team during the agency’s 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Mariana. NOAA recently shared a clear high-resolution video of the fish.

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Data from lost Hitomi satellite suggests black holes may be galactic regulators

Data from lost Hitomi satellite suggests black holes may be galactic regulators

Earlier this year, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) launched its Hitomi satellite into space. The x-ray satellite was intended to study, among other things, the Perseus cluster, a massive cluster of galaxies more than 200 million light years from Earth. Hitomi was the most advanced x-ray satellite to launch successfully into space and had the potential to lead to a number of excellent discoveries, but unfortunately, it was only a month before the satellite started to spin out of control and break apart, with JAXA announcing it had failed in its attempts to reconnect with the satellite not long after.

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