Science

Yolk-and-shell nanoparticle could boost capacity in lithium-ion batteries

Yolk-and-shell nanoparticle could boost capacity in lithium-ion batteries

The technology world is ever changing and one of the fastest changing parts of the tech world are screen resolutions. It seems every time we look up resolutions are getting higher. One important aspect of the tech world for products of all types that hasn't evolved as fast as consumers would like is battery life. A new nanoparticle called the yolk-and-shell nanoparticle could usher in a new era of lithium-ion batteries.

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Pathway Genomics is latest to hawk genome test

Pathway Genomics is latest to hawk genome test

If 23andMe is appealing but you haven't yet taken the plunge, there's a new option from which to choose: Pathway Genomics, which has introduced new genetics testing service. The company called its test the “Pathway Fit” genetic test, and it looks at more than 75 genetic markers for information about things like one’s metabolism and how certain types of exercise affect the individuals.

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NASA pic spurs conspiracy theory about crabs on Mars

NASA pic spurs conspiracy theory about crabs on Mars

Let's play a game. It's called, "Can you spot the crab in this NASA picture from Mars?" If you look and look again and still can't find that pesky crab, don't be dismayed. The crab (probably) doesn't exist, and so you shouldn't be upset unless you actually do see a crab or two in the picture, in which case you have our condolences. That hasn't stopped the Internet from lighting up with speculation, accusations that NASA is keeping another secret, and the disappointing reality that, apparently, a crab is our first introduction to alien lifeforms.

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This frog has mastered the headbutt of death

This frog has mastered the headbutt of death

A researcher has come across a frog with an ultra-flexible neck, poisonous skin, and a spiky skull — all of which work together to facilitate a headbutt of death. Or, at the very least, a headbutt that results in hours of what is described as intense pain. The venomous frog was happened upon by researcher Carlos Jared, who didn’t at first realize the frog was dangerous to hold. According to Jared, he picked up one of the frogs and it began struggling and headbutting his hand. He described the sensation as at first being like rough sandpaper, and later on being intensely painful.

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Striking ‘Virgin Rainbow’ opal to be showcased in Australia

Striking ‘Virgin Rainbow’ opal to be showcased in Australia

A beautiful opal called the Virgin Rainbow is currently on its way to an Australian museum, where it will be showcased alongside some other rare, valuable and otherwise precious items. The opal will go on display starting late next month and will remain in the exhibition until February 2016. Opals are unique, at least as far as gemstones go, but this one is particularly notable due to its striking colors and rare shape. It is said to be the finest opal in the world.

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Black hole fountains shepherd new galaxies into life

Black hole fountains shepherd new galaxies into life

A black-hole fountain might sound like something from science fiction, but NASA believes it's actually part of a high-energy cycle by which galaxies coalesce. Combining high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imagery with ground-based captures, scientists were able to observe knots of hot, blue stars that were forming along the jets from active black holes, with a thunderstorm of heated and cooling gases through giant elliptical galaxies.

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Earthworm guts may have commercial value

Earthworm guts may have commercial value

Yesterday we wrote about a study on earthworms and the potential for their newly discovered toxin-destroying guts. Today we've had a chat with the scientists behind that study, confirming that there really, truly is great potential for said guts. We spoke with Manuel Liebeke, lead author on the study and Research Associate at Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology as well as Jacob G Bundy, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, co-author on the study.

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Ghost of a dying star captured by ESO

Ghost of a dying star captured by ESO

Today we're seeing that the Very Large Telescope has returned an image from space which eclipses all others of its kind. This is the image of a dying star. What you're seeing is the remnants of a star that's long since burned out. Gases are spreading outward in an orb, a sort of ghost of the brightly lit gas giant it once was. This is a nebula, known now as the Southern Owl Nebula, appearing here with a diameter of nearly four light-years.

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NASA’s EPIC new photos show our moon’s brilliance

NASA’s EPIC new photos show our moon’s brilliance

NASA has released a new sequence of images offering a rare, and incredible, look at the moon passing in front of the sunlit side of Earth. The images, which NASA ever so kindly shared as a GIF, the internet's favorite format, are impressive in that they clearly depict the relationship between our planet and the lunar surface, with the comparison revealing just how bring Earth really is. Also impressive is the fact that the photos were captured from about 1 millions miles away.

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Worms defense against plants has big implications for science

Worms defense against plants has big implications for science

A unique compound of chemicals has been discovered in the guts of earthworms in a study on how these creatures break down toxins in soil. This study centered on polyphenols, chemical compounds produced by plants that contain phenol, aka carbolic acid. Soil is polyphenol-rich, meaning earthworms - who eat and process soil - need to cope with a "high-polyphenol diet." They eat toxins, how do they do it? As it turns out, earthworms work with a compound scientists are calling "drilodefensin", able to metabolize these toxins effectively.

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Milky Way’s stars found prone to leaving home

Milky Way’s stars found prone to leaving home

Significant movement in star orbits around our Milky Way galaxy have been found in a study that spanned 4-years and nearly 100,000 stars. "In our modern world, many people move far away from their birthplaces," said lead author and NMSU astronomy graduate student Michael Hayden, "now we're finding the same is true of stars in our galaxy." It would appear that around 30% of the stars in our Milky Way have traveled a sizable distance from their birthplaces to completely different orbits over long periods of time.

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