Science

MatchGrid pioneers a six-way kidney donation chain

MatchGrid pioneers a six-way kidney donation chain

Organ transplant lists are notoriously long. Sometimes a patient in need has to wait years to receive a transplant, if they are lucky enough to receive one at all. The most successful transplants come from living donors, but a faithful friend isn't always a medical match to her friend in need. Enter MatchGrid, a biomedical program designed to match potential kidney donors and recipients. MatchGrid was created by former WIRED editor and kidney recipient David Jacobs. His program established a method to match twelve people and create a six-way kidney transplant chain.

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Candy Rocket is a real rocket fueled by candy

Candy Rocket is a real rocket fueled by candy

If the Killer Klowns from Outer Space had a long-range weapon, this would definitely be it. Some industrious and fun-loving rocket scientists (and, apparently, candy experts?) from Japan put their brilliant minds together to bring to life a project designed to inspire the youngest generation upward, as well as maybe do something that has never been done before. What did they do? Created a rocket powered by candy, launching it with a fiery burst to over 800ft. in the sky.

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Solar Impulse 2 launches its first solar-powered flight around the world

Solar Impulse 2 launches its first solar-powered flight around the world

André Borschberg and Bertrand Piccard are going around the globe again. They first flew across America in their solar-powered plane two years ago. This time, they are flying an improved design, the Solar Impulse 2, around the world. They are taking off from Abu Dhabi today and fly around the world. It was initially supposed to launch in February, but was delayed due to strong winds and bad weather. The flights will total at over 500 hours and is to be divided up into multiple legs.

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Google researchers work around Quantum Computing errors

Google researchers work around Quantum Computing errors

Quantum computers can solve problems that would take an ordinary computer millions of years to complete. It would take not thousands, but millions of years to create solutions to complex equations. Google and researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) have just tackled the latest roadblock that was holding back quantum computing. They created program groups called qubits, which use delicate quantum physics to represent information. They programmed these qubits to identify and prevent calculation errors. Qubits haven't actually prevented initial bit-flip errors, but they prevent the mistake from derailing a calculation.

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Pleurobot is a robotic salamander skeleton

Pleurobot is a robotic salamander skeleton

Robotics researchers like to base the robots they build off living creatures. Those living creatures can be humans, fish, donkies, and even salamanders. The latter is the animal that the Pleurobot is based on. The Pleurobot isn’t only designed to look like a salamander, it's designed to move, and swim like one as well.

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Targeted nano-particles can now prevent heart attacks

Targeted nano-particles can now prevent heart attacks

Soon it may be possible to prevent heart attacks by an injection of nano-particles into the bloodstream, according to the newest research paper from the scientists at Columbia University Medical Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in America. A large part of that is atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries. This occurs as plaques build up along the inside of the arterial wall. The research team created targeted nano-particles designed to heal atherosclerosis. This is the latest discovery in a growing field of pint-sized medical discoveries. We've seen robots that can swim inside your eyeball and smart pills, but nothing as small as this nano-treatment.

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NASA Dawn spacecraft nears Ceres orbital insertion

NASA Dawn spacecraft nears Ceres orbital insertion

NASA has announced that the Dawn spacecraft is nearing orbital insertion around the dwarf planet Ceres. The Dawn mission will be the first mission to successfully visit a dwarf planet when it enters orbit around Ceres on March 6. As the spacecraft gets ready to enter orbit and gets closer to the surface of Ceres, the probe is sending back detailed images.

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Supermassive black hole’s quasar is fastest ever formed

Supermassive black hole’s quasar is fastest ever formed

Scientists lead by Xue-Bing Wu from Peking University have spotted a quasar that dates back nearly to the beginning of time. This beast goes by the name of SDSSJ010013.021280225.8 - or if you want to be short about it, just SDSS J0100+2802. What makes this monstrous heavenly body so important is its age and its size. While it's not the largest black hole ever detected, it's still 12 billion times our own Sun's mass - and it's sitting in the center of a quasar that's very, very bright.

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