Science

NASA probe may have captured ancient interstellar space dust

NASA probe may have captured ancient interstellar space dust

Microscopic dust particles that could date back to the very start of our solar system have been extracted from NASA's Stardust spacecraft payload, promising to be the first contemporary samples of interstellar dust. Stardust returned its collection of stellar detritus back in 2006, and thus began a painstaking sift through the particles to see what goodies had been gathered during the three billion mile journey.

Continue Reading

The real Ender’s Game: DARPA kids testing tomorrow’s MIL-TEC

The real Ender’s Game: DARPA kids testing tomorrow’s MIL-TEC

A new report into DARPA-funded research draws deep connections between computer games for children and advanced military software, a modern day Ender's Game using STEM to improve US soldier training. These aren't pre-teens inadvertently directing fleets of starships to destroy alien planets, though, with the kids instead said to be unknowingly helping develop software which will train military personnel on things like avoiding counter-insurgency and pacifying occupied territories.

Continue Reading

World’s fastest camera shoots 4.4 trillion fps

World’s fastest camera shoots 4.4 trillion fps

The world's fastest camera, capable of shooting at 4.4 trillion frames per second, has been developed in Japan, able to capture movement at one-sixth the speed of light. Using a new technique called Sequentially Times All-optical Mapping Photography (STAMP), the camera is around 1,000 times faster than any of its existing rivals, and opens the door to new understanding of chemical reactions and more.

Continue Reading

Google has a new enemy: sharks

Google has a new enemy: sharks

Look, I don’t know what it takes to lay thousands of miles of undersea cable, but I know there are some vicious animals under the surface. Google is finding that one out the hard way; it seems sharks are biting their various data cables laid under the sea.

Continue Reading

Supermassive black holes’ diets revealed: Crushed stars and X-rays

Supermassive black holes’ diets revealed: Crushed stars and X-rays

The feasting habits of supermassive black holes are under investigation by two teams of astronomers, with X-rays giving up the secrets of three consumed stars, and even how light itself can be bent by the voracious forces. While stars being destroyed by black holes are a rare, once-in-every-10,000-years occurrence, researchers in Russia have identified what they say are three cases. Meanwhile, NASA has been using its own space telescopes to see how X-rays themselves are bent by black holes.

Continue Reading

Gecko feet breakthrough could shape sticky robots

Gecko feet breakthrough could shape sticky robots

The method geckos use to switch their sticky feet on and off could open the door to clever new adhesives or even robots that could by turns cling to walls or rocky surfaces but then spring away with minimal exertion. A forest of tiny hairs known as setae cover the lizards' feet, and researchers at Oregon State University have figured out how they can toggle the stickiness of those hairs.

Continue Reading

NASA’s Robo-Glove up for license by Iron Man and you

NASA’s Robo-Glove up for license by Iron Man and you

The teams at NASA and GM behind the Robonaut 2's Robo-Glove have made the decision to allow licensing of their technology for public use. The glove is made to amplify the abilities of the wearer, not entirely unlike that of the glove of Iron Man in the Marvel Comics universe. This glove allows its user to blast through tasks that require high hand strength - grasping and repetitive tasks especially.

Continue Reading

Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Next