Science

Solar cell turns CO2 into hydrocarbon fuel

Solar cell turns CO2 into hydrocarbon fuel

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago have created a breakthrough solar cell that can be produced cheaply and is able to efficiently create a usable hydrocarbon fuel using carbon dioxide found in the air and sunlight. The new solar cell literally creates usable fuel from thin air and light. The scientists have reported their findings in the July 29 issues of Science.

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Skydiver sets record with 25,000ft jump using net instead of parachute

Skydiver sets record with 25,000ft jump using net instead of parachute

A skydiving world record was set in the California desert on Saturday as Luke Aikins became the first person ever to jump 25,000 feet without the use of a parachute, landing in a net positioned on the ground instead. The 42-year-old, with over 18,000 previous jumps under his belt, experienced two minutes of free-fall before landing in a net measuring 100-by-100 feet suspended with four 200 feet tall cranes.

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Apollo astronauts are dying from diseases caused by space radiation

Apollo astronauts are dying from diseases caused by space radiation

Florida State University Dean of the College of Human Sciences Michael Delp has detailed a sad reality affecting the Apollo astronauts: cardiovascular health issues caused by their exposure to space radiation. According to the study recently published in Scientific Reports, the astronauts who travelled into space as part of the lunar missions are largely suffering cardiovascular effects as a result, with 43-percent of the deceased individuals having died for reasons related to cardiovascular issues.

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Carcass leads scientists to new beaked whale species

Carcass leads scientists to new beaked whale species

A study newly published in Marine Mammal Science details evidence that a whale carcass discovered in 2014 is part of a species that has long gone undiscovered, at least in official capacities. Though new to science, fishermen have been aware of this particular variety of beaked whale for a while — Japanese fishermen, for example, call it karasu (raven) due to its somewhat dark color. However, living varieties of the critter have thus far evaded scientists.

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Motorized device helps infants at risk for cerebral palsy

Motorized device helps infants at risk for cerebral palsy

This may look like how Eleven started as an infant in Stranger Things, but it's actually a device that is designed to help infants who are at risk of developing cerebral palsy. This condition covers a range of early neurological disorders that affect movement and muscle coordination and can be caused from a number of factors. Those factors include brain damage during birth, infection, and trauma.

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New study shows cloned sheep are living long lives with few health problems

New study shows cloned sheep are living long lives with few health problems

Those of you who survived the roarin' 1990s will almost certainly remember Dolly the Sheep, who was created from a single adult cell that was combined with an egg cell that had been stripped of its DNA. In other words, Dolly was a clone. Dolly was all over the news when she was born in 1996, but soon after, she started to suffer from health problems, with many people assuming that she was facing these issues because she was a clone.

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In climate change fight, record high temperatures for 2016 surprise scientists

In climate change fight, record high temperatures for 2016 surprise scientists

There's some discouraging news concerning the fight against climate change today, as scientists with the World Meteorological Organization's climate research arm are saying that the record high temperatures we've seen so far this year are coming as something of a surprise to them. Though they predicted to see increasing temperatures this year, it would appear that the highs we've been experiencing have exceeded expectations, and that may have some worrying implications for the rate at which the climate is changing.

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MIT lithium-oxygen battery lasts a long time and is more efficient

MIT lithium-oxygen battery lasts a long time and is more efficient

MIT has announced a breakthrough in battery technology that might one day mean EVs that can drive further on a charge and gadgets that last longer away from an outlet. For a long time MIT and other research organizations have been looking at lithium-air batteries, but those batteries have some significant drawbacks. While lithium-air promises high-energy output compared to weight, they waste much of the power introduced as heat and performance degrades quickly. The new MIT lithium-oxygen battery overcomes these big drawbacks.

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Spider silk microstructure found to have unique acoustic properties

Spider silk microstructure found to have unique acoustic properties

Researchers have learned another thing about spider silk, and as with past discoveries, it may lead to the development of new materials for use among humans. This time around, a group of researchers from Rice University and beyond busied themselves with studying the microstructure of spider webs, doing so to learn how they transmit phonons — that is, quasiparticles of sound. As it turns out, spider silk possesses something called a phonon band gap.

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Tiny Microbots can deliver drugs and perform medical operations

Tiny Microbots can deliver drugs and perform medical operations

Scientists from the EPFL and ETHZ have worked together to create some very interesting medical microbots that are tiny enough to be introduced into the human body to perform specific tasks. These tiny robots are being studied as a way to treat a variety of diseases and are designed to enter the body and deliver drugs at a specific location or to perform precise operations like clearing clogged arteries.

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Russian AI development could mean machines that understand emotion

Russian AI development could mean machines that understand emotion

Russian scientists are reportedly approaching a significant breakthrough in the realm of artificial intelligence. The scientists claim to be approaching a major development that would create machines that are capable of understanding human emotions. The claim comes from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI Cybernetics Department Prof. Alexi Samsonovich.

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Titanium-gold alloy makes ultra-hard artificial joints

Titanium-gold alloy makes ultra-hard artificial joints

Researchers have developed a new type of alloy that is said to be four times harder than most type of steel, the end goal being artificial joints that are harder and more durable. In the present day, titanium is the preferred type of metal for these artificial joints. In the future, though, a titanium-gold alloy may be used instead, with the mixture being about three parts titanium to one part gold. The alloy is four times harder than titanium.

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