Science

Robot bees being built to replace real bugs

Robot bees being built to replace real bugs

A little over a year after the first robot insect swarm was introduced by Harvard University’s Robert Wood, the bee problem in the United States hasn’t gotten any better. It’s not a problem of too many bees - on the contrary. Researchers are looking into ways to create artificial bees because of incredible losses of bees - and we need bees to pollinate the food we eat.

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Corning donates $1.8M in hardware to private space telescope

Corning donates $1.8M in hardware to private space telescope

A cancelled NASA program appears to be the source of a major stash of mirror components Corning will soon be donating to a private cause. Suggesting the original project will not be revealed due to customer confidentiality, Corning has made note that they’ll be sending the collection to BoldlyGo Institute. This group will be aiming to put its ASTRO-1 telescope into orbit within the next 15 years.

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NASA IceCube hunts climate change and cost savings

NASA IceCube hunts climate change and cost savings

NASA will take advantage of new tiny satellite technology, CubeSats, to test a new weather-monitoring technology that could help unlock the secrets of climate change, the space agency has announced. IceCube - also known as Earth-1, is around a foot long and four inches wide, and takes advantage of satellite standardization expected to make launching orbiting probes faster and more cost-effective.

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Painless “universal” cancer blood test being explored

Painless “universal” cancer blood test being explored

A universal blood test that could identify any type of cancer in a patient is one step closer, researchers say, potentially opening the door to diagnosing unusual variations and avoiding expensive and often painful invasive biopsies. Although in its early stages, the Lymphocyte Genome Sensitivity (LGS) test is already being explored for commercial purposes as Oncascan, spotting cancer by examining how readily white blood cells are damaged by ultraviolet light.

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Dinosaurs may have survived if not for “colossal bad luck”

Dinosaurs may have survived if not for “colossal bad luck”

Dinosaurs may have survived had the asteroid that struck Earth been off by just a few million years, scientists now claim, with "colossal bad luck" blamed for their extinction. The six mile wide space rock struck the planet arrived at just the wrong time, researchers at the University of Edinburgh say, combining with existing environmental changes on Earth that added up to dinosaur disaster.

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tinyTesla: the tiny coil that sparks, sings and teaches

tinyTesla: the tiny coil that sparks, sings and teaches

A lot of things today are about building things on your own, with things like Raspberry Pi and MakerBot. But how about building your own Tesla coil right at home, or preferably in school? tinyTesla is trying to deliver just that, but, instead of shipping something educational but boring, oneTesla, the startup behind it, will be helping you build a Tesla coil that can sing.

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