Science

Neanderthal cannibalism evidence found in Belgium

Neanderthal cannibalism evidence found in Belgium

A cave in Belgium has produced remains with signs of cannibalism among Neanderthals in the region, according to a new study. The bones were found in the Troisieme cavern in Goyet; it is the largest cache of Neanderthal bones found in Northern Europe, and it comprises four adults and one child. Of these remains, about 30-percent of the bones are broken in a way that would have been used to extract marrow and they show cut marks from tools that only human could wield.

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Exoplanet has three suns and takes 550 years for a single orbit

Exoplanet has three suns and takes 550 years for a single orbit

Scientists have discovered an exoplanet far, far from the Earth that has a unique solar system. The planet is called HD 131399Ab and it is dubbed the widest ranging exoplanet in a mutli star system. That is a fancy way of saying that this planet lives in a solar system where there are three suns and it has a massive orbit. How massive is that orbit you ask- about 500 times larger than the Earth's.

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Researchers store 200MB of data on molecular strands

Researchers store 200MB of data on molecular strands

Microsoft and researchers from the University of Washington have set a new record and reached a milestone in DNA storage. The team has been able to store 200MB of data on the molecular strands of DNA. Just as interesting as setting a new record for data capacity is the fact that the stored data took up a tiny amount of space described as "much smaller than the tip of a pencil."

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U.S. Navy funds bomb-sniffing bugs research

U.S. Navy funds bomb-sniffing bugs research

The human sense of smell isn't that great, and so humans have largely relegated the task of sniffing out items -- non-pungent drugs, hidden bombs, missing people -- to dogs. Dogs are great at what they do, but they pose some issues, as well. For one thing, training bomb-sniffing dogs is expensive. In addition, a dog can alert to something but it can't break down what it smells or give us any details. Bugs though? They may be the solution.

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Pale eel-like fish spotted alive in deep sea waters for the first time

Pale eel-like fish spotted alive in deep sea waters for the first time

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has released a video showing a living, pale, “ghostly” fish; this is the first time the creature has been found alive, marking a new milestone discovery for the agency. The fish was found by the NOAA Okeanos Explorer team during the agency’s 2016 Deepwater Exploration of the Mariana. NOAA recently shared a clear high-resolution video of the fish.

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Data from lost Hitomi satellite suggests black holes may be galactic regulators

Data from lost Hitomi satellite suggests black holes may be galactic regulators

Earlier this year, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) launched its Hitomi satellite into space. The x-ray satellite was intended to study, among other things, the Perseus cluster, a massive cluster of galaxies more than 200 million light years from Earth. Hitomi was the most advanced x-ray satellite to launch successfully into space and had the potential to lead to a number of excellent discoveries, but unfortunately, it was only a month before the satellite started to spin out of control and break apart, with JAXA announcing it had failed in its attempts to reconnect with the satellite not long after.

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This Tetris runs on a giant home-built “megaprocessor” computer

This Tetris runs on a giant home-built “megaprocessor” computer

Creating a Tetris game to be played on the side of a Seattle skyscraper is undoubtedly a huge undertaking, but that's relatively easy for a company with resources and ready-made components at its disposal. On the other hand, creating a Tetris game to be played on a computer built from scratch to resemble a blown up microprocessor probably takes the cake. It's also insanely hard too. But that's exactly what James Newman from Cambridge has accomplished. Both creating what he calls a "megaprocessor" and using it for what it does best: playing Tetris.

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‘Superbug’ bacteria found in Rio’s water raises Olympics concerns

‘Superbug’ bacteria found in Rio’s water raises Olympics concerns

As if there aren’t already enough concerns about the Rio Olympics, a team of scientists from Brazil have announced that a drug-resistant ‘superbug’ bacteria has been found at popular beach destinations in the region. The news is troublesome for many reasons, not the least of which is the 2016 Olympic Games planned for the city this summer which will bring in hundreds of thousands of visitors, potentially exposing them to the drug-resistant bacteria.

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World’s largest radio telescope completed in China

World’s largest radio telescope completed in China

For the last half decade, researchers in China have been at work on a gigantic radio telescope hailed as the world's largest single dish radio telescope. That monster telescope completed construction on July 3, 2016 with the installation of the last of its 4,450 reflecting panels. The telescope is equivalent in size to 30 soccer fields and is called the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope or FAST.

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Juno probe is finally in orbit around Jupiter

Juno probe is finally in orbit around Jupiter

Five years after it left our home, the Juno probe, aptly named after the Roman queen of the gods, has finally entered Jupiter's orbit. Although it is but a means to the probe's ultimate goal, which is, of course, studying the biggest planet in the solar system, the fact that it got to that point in one piece is nothing short of a scientific and engineering miracle. Presuming it survives the next 20 months, Juno will be able to amass a wealth of scientific data that will hopefully give further insight not only into the nature of the giant but into the origins of our solar system itself.

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Study: marijuana reduces plaque, inflammation related to Alzheimer’s

Study: marijuana reduces plaque, inflammation related to Alzheimer’s

The THC and some other compounds found in marijuana have been found effective in treating many ailments, and past studies have found signs that it may be helpful in preventing Alzheimer's disease, as well. Research has indicated that marijuana reduces inflammation in the brain which may contribute to dementia and Alzheimer's, and a recent study found that it also helps strip away the plaque found in the brain of Alzheimer's patients.

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The Ozone layer healing itself is good news for the fight against Climate Change

The Ozone layer healing itself is good news for the fight against Climate Change

Earlier today, we heard that the hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica is in the beginning stages of healing. The reason we're seeing this reversal seems largely due to the Montreal Protocol, which banned the use of CFCs in 1987. For those who don't know, CFCs release chlorine atoms when they're hit by ultraviolent light, which eats away at the ozone layer and is the reason the hole over Antartica grows during the continent's summer months and shrinks during the winter. This is not only great news for the environment, but it's also an encouraging development for the efforts against climate change.

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