Science

AOptix’s laser-radio tech could be Internet’s future

AOptix’s laser-radio tech could be Internet’s future

The ubiquity of mobile devices is starting to push the limits of the Internet's infrastructure to the breaking point. Add that to the fact that a lot more regions don't have quality connections or don't have Internet at all, and you have a scenario where service providers are scrambling to add more and more cables, especially fiber optic ones, on land and on sea. But such installations cost time, money, and, in some cases, political will. AOptix's solution is cheaper as it uses a combination of laser and radio waves to bring the Internet anywhere.

Continue Reading

Rosetta Philae lander detects organic molecules on comet surface

Rosetta Philae lander detects organic molecules on comet surface

After a decade long journey Rosetta was able to insert itself into orbit around its target comet and more recently, it sent its Philae lander down to the surface of the comet to see what the comet is made of. The latest report from the scientists running the Rosetta program is that the Philae lander has detected organic molecules on the surface of the comet. These organic molecules are carbon containing and are the basis of life here on Earth.

Continue Reading

Tony Hawk rides hoverboard, stays airborne

Tony Hawk rides hoverboard, stays airborne

Forget everything you know” says Tony Hawk. The skateboarding legend is talking about the Hendo, a hoverboard that actually does what it says it will (and what we want it to). Taking to a copper-lined mini half-pipe, Hawk at least shows what’s possible with a hoverboard in the right environment. In the video below, we find Hawk floating freely, spinning like a figure skater, and never getting off the board unless he wants to. It almost seems to be second nature.

Continue Reading

Philae comet lander goes to sleep as batteries near end

Philae comet lander goes to sleep as batteries near end

The Philae comet lander has gone into a sleep mode after being unable to get enough sunlight to recharge its batteries, the European Space Agency has reported. This follows a hiccup with landing that caused Philae to bounce off the comet's surface and eventually land elsewhere, with its final resting place being a position where it isn't able to get adequate sunlight. A ray of hope remains, however, as the mission controllers were able to rotate Philae enough before going idle that it may get more sunlight than previously available.

Continue Reading

Study: lightning strikes will increase with global warming

Study: lightning strikes will increase with global warming

In a picture of the dystopian future many paint for us, the world is scorched, and full of powerful storms. A new report suggests that might not be too far from the truth, should climate change continue unfettered. In a study published today in the Journal of Science, we find that the new thinking around climate change will bring increased lightning storms. According to the study, every two degrees fahrenheit we see in global warming will result in 12% more lightning in the US.

Continue Reading

Rosetta’s lander may be fading, but its photos are incredible

Rosetta’s lander may be fading, but its photos are incredible

Philae may be lost somewhere on Comet 67P, rapidly running out of power, and yet to tie itself down safely, but that's not stopping the Rosetta mission from sending back some incredible photos of the hurtling space rock. Images captured both by the lander itself and the Rosetta rocket that delivered it to Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko - and is currently orbiting it as a radio lifeline back to Earth - show the incredible surface both from close orbit and from Philae's unexpectedly awkward current resting place, though how much longer the probe will be able to send back footage is unclear.

Continue Reading

Philae future in question as comet lander battery dwindles

Philae future in question as comet lander battery dwindles

The Philae lander that traveled 3.98 million miles to land on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenkohas is now frantically attempting as much scientific research as it can, with the ESA concerned that its batteries could die in less than a day. The European Space Agency planned to run Philae, its Rosetta mission probe to a comet hurtling 80,000 mph through space, through until March 2015, investigating how the icy space rock was affected by the sun as it travels in the solar system, but an awkward landing - or, more accurately, three landings - has left the future of the experiment in question.

Continue Reading

Scientists descend mysterious Siberian sinkhole, reveal pics

Scientists descend mysterious Siberian sinkhole, reveal pics

Remember that massive Siberian sinkhole? There's still no answer about how these mysterious holes came about, but some brave scientists have donned their winter gear and descended into the depths of one, snapping pictures on the way down and from the bottom. Now those images are available, and they show the sheer size of the craters, as well as the glass-like icy walls. Oddly enough, some scientists think the cause could be the same responsible for the Bermuda Triangle.

Continue Reading

Robot dolphins go deep to understand Antarctic melt

Robot dolphins go deep to understand Antarctic melt

We knew the West Antarctic ice was melting, but it's taken a school of robotic dolphins to figure out why, with researchers at Caltech using ocean gliders to explore the ocean eddies responsible. The six foot long robots take advantage of changes in buoyancy to soar through the water, rather than propellers, and swam the Southern Ocean off the coast of the Antarctic Peninsula for two months, diving to depths of around 1.2 miles before surfacing again to report their findings around temperature and salinity via radio links to the Caltech team.

Continue Reading

Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next