Science

Vast IceCube telescope confirms ghostly Cosmic Neutrinos

Vast IceCube telescope confirms ghostly Cosmic Neutrinos

Ghostly cosmic neutrinos, the spawn of black holes and massive exploding stars, have been identified by astronomers, an "unequivocal signal" of the particles that could revolutionize star-gazing. Handiwork of the IceCube Collaboration, a group of scientists from all over the world sifting through data generated at the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the research finally pins down the tricky-to-spot cosmic neutrinos by virtue of their collisions with other particles.

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9-year-old gets ‘awesome’ gesture-controlled bionic arm

9-year-old gets ‘awesome’ gesture-controlled bionic arm

Josh Cathcart is a nine-year-old boy who was born missing a portion of his right arm, something that resulted in bullying and made life harder for him. Those troubles have been greatly minimized thanks to a new bionic arm from Touch Bionics, making him the first kid in the United Kingdom to get one of the company’s i-limb quantum prosthetics. The arm is functional, allowing him to grip items as small as LEGOs and do things for himself that he previously had trouble doing. This is said to be the first prosthetic hand able to alter its grip using gestures.

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Aztec skull rack may reveal thousands of decapitated human heads

Aztec skull rack may reveal thousands of decapitated human heads

Archaeologists in Mexico have revealed a skull rack found in the ruins of the Templo Mayor complex in Tenochtitlan. This is in modern Mexico City where the Museo del Templo Mayor now resides. As the museum displays history above, so do archaeologists continue to excavate below. Their most recent find is a skull rack built between 1485 and 1502, coming in at a cool 40-feet (12-meters) by 112-feet (34-meters), packed full of human skulls. Archaeologists on the case believe they've found the "Huey Tzompantli", or Main skull rack of the complex.

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Japanese scientists are making special plastic beer bottles

Japanese scientists are making special plastic beer bottles

Beer, you may have noticed, never comes in a plastic bottle (excepting certain circumstances). It does come in cans, but you'd have to search far and wide to find beer in a plastic bottle, and for one very good reason: plastic makes quick work of the beer's quality. It'll go flat too soon, the flavor will be affected, and depending on how it is stored, the bottles may leech chemicals into the beer, raising health concerns. All those issues, though, will soon be behind us.

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This awe-inspiring nebula looks like the Eye of Sauron

This awe-inspiring nebula looks like the Eye of Sauron

NASA has published another astounding image snapped from the universe that surrounds us, and unlike ones that resemble paradise or mythical lands, this one looks like something straight from one of humanity’s most beloved works of literature: the eye of Sauron. It is fiercely red and studded with flashes and specs of light that serve only to further enhance the glaring, direct gaze of a star and the surrounding nebula.

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Study calls humans unsustainable “super predators”

Study calls humans unsustainable “super predators”

A ten-year study is published on "the unique ecology of human predators", showing mankind to be an unsustainable threat to all wildlife on our planet. This paper, authored by C. Darimont, C. Fox, H. Bryan, and T. Reimchen, compares the predatory patterns of humans to all other predators on the planet. They show that humans kill adult prey at a median rate up to 14 times higher than other predators, with "particularly intense exploitation" of terrestrial carnivores and fish.

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NASA releases final close-up images of Saturn’s moon Dione

NASA releases final close-up images of Saturn’s moon Dione

NASA's spacecraft Cassini conducted its final close flyby of Saturn's moon Dione earlier this week, and the images have finally reached us here on Earth. NASA has just published some of the new photos, taken from less than 300 miles from the moon's surface, and they reveal some breathtaking views of the surface, seen with the highest resolution ever. The August 17th flyby was the fifth and final close encounter on the Cassini mission. While it's provided the best imagery, it wasn't the closest flyby of Dione ever, which was in 2011 at a distance of only 60 miles.

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New inexpensive method turns carbon dioxide into nanofibers

New inexpensive method turns carbon dioxide into nanofibers

Carbon emissions -- the same kind of pollution that is spawning giant crabs -- can be turned into carbon nanofibers using a new method said to be "potentially a lot cheaper" than current methods. Said the researcher behind it, the new method offers a “means of storing and sequestering carbon dioxide in a useful manner, a stable manner, and in a compact manner.” The new method could have big implications for the environment — if renewable energy is used to power the conversion process, it will be a particularly effective way to reduce carbon pollution levels.

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NASA will send your name to Mars on a microchip

NASA will send your name to Mars on a microchip

NASA will send your name to Mars on a microchip if you sign up before the midnight deadline on September 8. Upon signing up, users are presented with a futuristic-looking boarding pass including a “frequent flyer number” and other details, such as the launch site location, rocket, arrival site, when the launch is scheduled, and more. This batch of names (as you might know, NASA had done this before) will be shipping out with the Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport, more commonly called InSight.

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July 2015 is the new hottest month on record

July 2015 is the new hottest month on record

As mostly everyone anticipated, July 2015 became the hottest month on record, trumping previous title holder June 2015, which itself broke the record held by recent months before it. Last year was the hottest year on record, but as we've previously reported, this year has already broken heat records and is on track to become the newest "hottest year" recorded. In addition, a report from earlier this month has revealed that humanity has already used up nature's resources for this year, a rate that happened faster than in previous years.

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Researchers made an entirely new type of glass…by accident

Researchers made an entirely new type of glass…by accident

University of Chicago scientists have accidentally created an entirely new type of glass. Until now, glass has been defined by its randomness — it is amorphous and without a distinct order. That's why when scientists were presented with what UChicago says were “unusual peaks in what should have been featureless optical data,” they proceeded to investigate the matter. The end result? They'd created an entirely new type of glass, one that is organized rather than random, and that could result in more efficient devices in the future.

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