Science

Dodos weren’t as dumb as believed, had high sense of smell

Dodos weren’t as dumb as believed, had high sense of smell

Researchers have revealed that dodos, the extinct flightless bird upon which a certain insult is based, weren’t as dumb as commonly believed. The assertion follows an analysis of a dodo’s brain structure and size, the results of which hint at an intelligence level akin to that of pigeons. While the brain was small, it matched the birds’ average body size and indicated an exceptional sense of smell.

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Talcum Powder And Cancer Linked In $72 Million Johnson & Johnson Jury Award

Talcum Powder And Cancer Linked In $72 Million Johnson & Johnson Jury Award

Could there be a link between talcum powder and cancer? It depends on whether you choose to believe the scientific evidence or the recent actions of a jury in the state of Missouri, which this past week awarded $72 million in damages to the family of a woman who claimed her ovarian cancer was caused by the use of Johnson & Johnson's baby powder.

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German city bans single-use coffee pods

German city bans single-use coffee pods

Coffee pods -- those little plastic single-serve coffee containers you pop into, for example, a Keurig -- have been partially banned in the German city Hamburg. The ban covers single-use coffee pods, which are used once and then thrown away, rather than reusable coffee pods, which can be manually refilled with coffee grounds and essentially function as tiny coffee filters. The move was made out of environmental concern.

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Mars Express images reveal past Red Planet flooding

Mars Express images reveal past Red Planet flooding

The European Space Agency has published images of a Mars region showing marks left by water in the Red Planet’s distant past. According to the ESA, water has left “a variety” of marks on Mars, parts of which have been captured as part of the agency’s Mars Express mission. A large impact basin is shown in the newly published images, as well as thin grooves that had been cut by flowing water long ago.

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Tweet NASA your artwork and they’ll send it to an asteroid

Tweet NASA your artwork and they’ll send it to an asteroid

If you've ever thought of your artwork floating among the star, NASA has the opportunity for you. The space agency has launched a campaign dubbed "We The Explorers," where their OSIRIS-REx will be traveling to the asteroid Bennu and back, carrying art from anyone sent in via Twitter. It's basically a public time capsule that's being sent into space and deposited on an asteroid, where it will remain for all time.

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Virgin Galactic officially debuts SpaceShip Two, the VSS Unity

Virgin Galactic officially debuts SpaceShip Two, the VSS Unity

It's been some time in the making, but Virgin Galactic, the commercial space flight division of Sir Richard Branson's company, has officially taken the wraps off the new SpaceShip Two. As the first new craft from Virgin Galactic since the tragic crash during a 2014 test flight, killing one of two crew members, the ship will bear the name VSS Unity, which was given by none other than Stephen Hawking.

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Russia plans to use modified missiles to shoot asteroids

Russia plans to use modified missiles to shoot asteroids

The danger of large asteroids colliding with Earth is always a concern for space agencies around the world, and there are a number of plans on how to prevent this from happening. Russia, however, seems to have plans that involve a more direct approach: blowing up any approaching meteorites using intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs). Apparently this is the country's strategy for revenge for the 2013 meteor that exploded over the city of Chelyabinsk, injuring over 1,000 people.

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Study: you feel less guilty about causing pain when following orders

Study: you feel less guilty about causing pain when following orders

The question isn’t new: why is it that seemingly normal people are capable of committing terrible acts when told to do so? Instances of such actions are as old as time and span all sorts of situations — wars, abusive mentor/mentee relationships, and even experiments. Various studies have sought the answer, but commonly set their focus on the 'if' question -- if someone will do it and their subjective feelings about the actions. A new study, though, focuses on the 'why,' and its findings are disconcerting.

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Egypt’s Tarkhan dress is world’s oldest garment

Egypt’s Tarkhan dress is world’s oldest garment

The modern world has been given a glimpse of fashion as it existed 5,000 years ago. The Tarkhan dress, as it has been dubbed, is the oldest woven garment in the world, and though it is greatly degraded, it is easy to imagine how it looked thousands of years ago. The dress — which now looks more like a very thin shirt — was discovered in an Egyptian tomb, where it found inside-out and creased.

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NASA WFIRST mission to offer a view 100 times bigger than Hubble

NASA WFIRST mission to offer a view 100 times bigger than Hubble

The Hubble Space Telescope has been in orbit for years now and has made some major discoveries during its life. Hubble is set to be replaced by the James Webb Space Telescope and NASA is looking past the James Webb to the more distant future. NASA is set to kick off a new mission called the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope or WFIRST. WFIRST will take a much larger view of the universe than Hubble was capable of; NASA says that WFIRST will have a view 100 times as large as Hubble. According to NASA the wider view will help scientists to unravel mysteries of dark energy, dark matter, and to explore the cosmos.

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Study maps climate change sensitivity around the globe

Study maps climate change sensitivity around the globe

Researchers have developed a new method for determining how sensitive a particular ecosystem is to climate change, finding that places like eastern parts of Australian, tropical rainforests, regions in central Asia and South America, and more are all particularly sensitive to such variations. Such data can be used in assessing ecosystems and anticipating how particular parts of the world will be affected by short and long term climate changes.

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Study: humans, neanderthals interbred earlier than thought

Study: humans, neanderthals interbred earlier than thought

Neanderthals and humans may have interbred must earlier than researchers had previously believed, according to a new study. Such a finding comes from a DNA analysis revealing what is (likely) an instance of human and neanderthal interbreeding many thousands of years before the oldest documented instance of such. If the analysis is correct, the interbreeding happened about 100,000 years ago.

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