Science

Rare and bizarre megamouth shark caught and cut up

Rare and bizarre megamouth shark caught and cut up

An incredibly rare megamouth shark has been caught in Japan, a deep water species with a distinctly disproportionately scaled body, of which fewer than 100 sightings have been recorded. The shark - so named because of its huge head, far larger than you'd expect in size given the rest of the body - measured around 13 feet in length, and was the subject of a public autopsy by the Marine Science Museum of Shiuoka, Japan.

Continue Reading

Three months and 13bn years: Birth of the Universe simulated

Three months and 13bn years: Birth of the Universe simulated

The way the universe evolved in the moments right after the Big Bang has been modeled in the most accurate simulation so far, with supercomputers working for a solid three months to crunch the calculations. The model, developed by a research team led by MIT, not only looks at how 41,416 different galaxies formed from dark matter, but goes on to make new predictions about how the raw ingredients are distributed through space.

Continue Reading

Science adding new element 117 to Periodic Table

Science adding new element 117 to Periodic Table

Element Z=117 has been acknowledged this week by a team of scientists, these scientists having successfully created several atoms of said element in a lab. This lovely piece of creation will - once it’s finalized - be element 117, for now it’s code-named Ununseptium. Final confirmation will need to be independently carried out - you can’t just jump in after 3 years of research and declare a new element, after all.

Continue Reading

A bus-sized asteroid buzzed Earth (with just days notice)

A bus-sized asteroid buzzed Earth (with just days notice)

Funding for asteroid detection and the need for greater awareness of potentially dangerous space rocks has been sparked again, after astronomers caught sight of a bus-sized asteroid headed closer to Earth than the moon's orbit only days before it passed. 2014 HL129 came within 186,000 miles of us in the early hours of Saturday morning, NASA's Asteroid Watch project confirmed, having only spotted the roughly 25 foot wide rock the previous Wednesday.

Continue Reading

A Zombie war is raging in the deep sea

A Zombie war is raging in the deep sea

As we prepare for the likely Zombie apocalypse, signs begin to emerge that it’s a more widespread issue than previously imagined. Deep sea bacteria have been found infected, feeding tirelessly on the sweet, sweet sulfur that spews from vents on the ocean floor. Though they normally feed on them as a means of survival, a virus is causing them to mindlessly  accelerate their feeding.

Continue Reading

NASA launches Space Station lifeboat project

NASA launches Space Station lifeboat project

If Sandra Bullock in Gravity proved anything, it's that George Clooney is smug even in space and that having an emergency exit back to Earth is probably a good thing. NASA is now working on the latter, with plans to equip the International Space Station (ISS) with a dedicated lifeboat for the first time in forty years, giving the orbiting crew there a place to not only shelter from incidents on the platform, but a way to escape it should something go seriously wrong.

Continue Reading

SpaceX reusable F9R rocket aces 1,000m safe landing trial

SpaceX reusable F9R rocket aces 1,000m safe landing trial

SpaceX has shared new footage of its Falcon 9 Reusable (F9R) rocket being tested only for the second time, carefully blasting up to 1,000m and then safely returning back to the ground. The rocket quadrupled the height that it reached before descending over the first trial, making a landing that was a whole lot more successful than that of the SpaceX Falcon 9 last week.

Continue Reading

How to build an Egyptian pyramid? Just add water

How to build an Egyptian pyramid? Just add water

One of the enduring mysteries of the pyramids - how ancient Egyptians managed to transport the huge stones used in their construction - may have been solved, with researchers discovering that simply adding water might have been enough. Blocks were known to have been dragged on sleds, but historians had always been uncertain as to how the Egyptian's workers avoided simply creating vast ridges of sand as the weight of the stones dug in.

Continue Reading