Science

Wearables for sharks: Life-logging misunderstood predators

Wearables for sharks: Life-logging misunderstood predators

2014 may be "the year of wearables" but sharks probably won't be Google or Fitbit's next target audience, despite groundbreaking new research by the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa and the University of Tokyo to see exactly what the fearsome predators get up to. While sharks may be well known for inspiring terror in movies like Jaws, scientists actually know relatively little about their underwater lives. Now, thanks to what's described as "flight data recorders for sharks" the researchers have been able to fill in some of the gaps in knowledge.

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NASA releases flock of CubeSat nanosatellites from ISS

NASA releases flock of CubeSat nanosatellites from ISS

NASA has deployed a flock of CubeSat miniature satellites from the International Space Station, sharing an image of the NanoRacks hardware being released from the end of a customized robotic arm. The satellites - each around the size of a loaf of bread - are part of a 33-strong fleet the majority of which will be used by Planet Labs for its project to provide open access to high-resolution imagery of Earth.

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X-rays of living cell is world’s first

X-rays of living cell is world’s first

A team of researchers with Germany's DESY have developed a way to x-ray living cells, something that provides a better look at the structure and function than traditionally used methods, which involves killing the cell and fixing it with chemicals. The information was detailed in the journal Physical Review Letters.

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World’s oldest cheese found buried with Chinese mummies

World’s oldest cheese found buried with Chinese mummies

When you think of mummies, odds are you mind goes to Egypt automatically. The Egyptians weren't the only people to mummify their dead in ancient times. A group of archaeologists studying Chinese mummies has made an interesting discovery that has nothing to do with the mummification process itself. The team has discovered what they say is the world's oldest cheese.

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SeaOrbiter hits crowdfunding goal

SeaOrbiter hits crowdfunding goal

Recall the SeaOrbiter we detailed back in November? It has hit its crowdfunding goal of about $444,700 USD, and as such is destined to set sail for ocean parts unknown. With the vessel, voids and deficits in oceanic research will be filled, and researchers will have an awesome aquatic research center through which to study.

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NASA Kepler mission discovers 715 new planets

NASA Kepler mission discovers 715 new planets

NASA's Kepler mission has made an exciting discovery and subsequent announcement: the discovery of 715 new planets orbiting 305 stars. Says the space agency, about 95-percent of the newly discovered planets are smaller than Neptune, making them more or less around the size of Earth, and makes for a "significant increase" in known small planets.

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HTC Power To Give brings supercomputer power with smartphones

HTC Power To Give brings supercomputer power with smartphones

Using the processing power of smartphones from around the globe, HTC is making an initiative called Power To Give for theresearch of medicine, science, and echology. This initiative will work with an HTC Power To Give app from Google Play for Android. This app will divert a bit of your smartphone’s processing power towards the initiative whenever you’d like to contribute.

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HTC research: good design makes happy consumers

HTC research: good design makes happy consumers

The folks at HTC have done a scientific study which they suggest leads them to believe that good design makes us happy. In a scientific study of the physical (biometric) responses of 2,177 participants "from seven markets", HTC has come to the conclusion that if a product is well-made and beautiful, it’ll make people happy.

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Study turns selfies into a science

Study turns selfies into a science

Seflies -- images one takes of him or herself, often with the front-facing camera on their smartphone -- has become a digital world staple so common the word has made its way into the dictionary. As such, it isn't surprising one team of researchers conducted a mass study of thousands of images, breaking them down into details like pose, location, and gender.

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