Science

Hubble finds an underground ocean on Jupiter’s largest moon

Hubble finds an underground ocean on Jupiter’s largest moon

The possibility of life on other planets just became more probable with NASA's Hubble telescope's latest discovery. Hubble uncovered evidence of a giant underground ocean on Jupiter's largest moon, Ganymede. Ganymede is the largest moon in our entire solar system and has long drawn the focus of astronomers as they search for conditions that could be hospitable to life on other planets. The theory of underground oceans on Ganymede was first proposed on in the 1970's, but it wasn't until now that scientists uncovered solid evidence.

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Saturn’s moon Enceladus might have waters warm enough for life

Saturn’s moon Enceladus might have waters warm enough for life

Researchers have been studying Saturn's moon Enceladus after research has shown that the moon might have water under the icy surface that is warm enough to sustain life. Scientist have been looking at data gathered by the Cassini orbiter that hints that the moon might have thermal activity on the ocean floor that could provide the conditions needed for life to develop.

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Super-Earth Gliese 581d might have been dismissed too soon

Super-Earth Gliese 581d might have been dismissed too soon

Scientists around the world are searching the universe for Earth-like planets that orbit parent stars in the so-called Goldilocks zone where the temperatures are just right for liquid water and life as we know it. One such planet that was discovered back in 2009 is known as Gliese 581d. When the exo-planet was first discovered scientists thought it had a rocky surface and the potential for liquid water.

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Liquid metal robots might be more than science fiction soon

Liquid metal robots might be more than science fiction soon

It's as if all the pieces are falling in place to give birth to the SkyNet nightmare that haunts us in the Terminator universe: self-driving cars, a fleet of interconnected Internet-bearing satellites, and now, shape-shifting and self-propelling metal. This last one was a recent discovery of a group of researchers in Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, who stumbled upon a peculiar behavior of a certain mix of metals that, in the end, could change its shape to fit moulds and paths and propel itself forward as well.

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Heart-on-a-chip tests drugs’ cardiotoxicity with its real heartbeat

Heart-on-a-chip tests drugs’ cardiotoxicity with its real heartbeat

Heart disease is the leading cause of death among Americans. Recently the bio-tech industry has been exploding with cardiac research like last week's heart attack preventing nanobots. New research by the team at the University of California, Berkley has created working human heart cells on a tiny chip designed to test the efficacy of new drugs in clinical trials. This heart-on-a-chip is officially known as a cardiac microphysiological system, or MPS. Using this heart-on-a-chip, scientists can measure the potential cardiac damage of a drug before it reaches expensive human trials.

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Chameleon color changing abilities unlocked by science

Chameleon color changing abilities unlocked by science

A paper has been published this week in Nature Communications which shows how chameleons are able to swiftly and radically alter their exterior colors. Believe it or not, this study is brand new - science did not know how a creature like the Panther Chameleon was able to change colors based on emotion or surroundings. In addition to uncovering the secrets of miniature nanocrystals for color change, these scientists also uncovered another reason for their existence: passive thermal protection (made to keep cool).

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MatchGrid pioneers a six-way kidney donation chain

MatchGrid pioneers a six-way kidney donation chain

Organ transplant lists are notoriously long. Sometimes a patient in need has to wait years to receive a transplant, if they are lucky enough to receive one at all. The most successful transplants come from living donors, but a faithful friend isn't always a medical match to her friend in need. Enter MatchGrid, a biomedical program designed to match potential kidney donors and recipients. MatchGrid was created by former WIRED editor and kidney recipient David Jacobs. His program established a method to match twelve people and create a six-way kidney transplant chain.

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Candy Rocket is a real rocket fueled by candy

Candy Rocket is a real rocket fueled by candy

If the Killer Klowns from Outer Space had a long-range weapon, this would definitely be it. Some industrious and fun-loving rocket scientists (and, apparently, candy experts?) from Japan put their brilliant minds together to bring to life a project designed to inspire the youngest generation upward, as well as maybe do something that has never been done before. What did they do? Created a rocket powered by candy, launching it with a fiery burst to over 800ft. in the sky.

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