Science

New research suggests Saturn’s rings & moons may be younger than dinosaurs

New research suggests Saturn’s rings & moons may be younger than dinosaurs

The most iconic feature of the planet Saturn — it's wide set of rings — along with its many icy moons may actually be much younger than previously thought. A new study published by the SETI Institute says that Saturn's rings and inner moons may be no more than 100 million years old, meaning they likely formed when dinosaurs roamed the Earth. That would make them about 4 billion years younger than the planet Saturn itself.

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Yellowstone hotspot had 12 ancient ‘super-eruptions’

Yellowstone hotspot had 12 ancient ‘super-eruptions’

Some really big eruptions happened during Yellowstone’s past, but they all may pale in comparison to a bunch of so-called “super eruptions” that took place in Idaho millions of years ago. According to researchers, these exceptionally massive eruptions happened between 8 and 12 million years ago, and were much, much larger than previously believed, eclipsing a bunch of ancient eruptions that happened in the same general region.

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Strange newly discovered cavefish can walk up cave walls

Strange newly discovered cavefish can walk up cave walls

It’s not everyday you see a fish that can walk, but just such a discovery was made by researchers with the New Jersey Institute of Technology. The cavefish was found in Thailand and features an unusual anatomy giving it the ability to climb its way up waterfalls -- something researchers believe could help shed light on evolutionary changes that happened many millions of years ago. No other (living) fish have been discovered with this ability.

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NASA says moon spin axis shifted by 5-degrees 3 billion years ago

NASA says moon spin axis shifted by 5-degrees 3 billion years ago

NASA has discovered evidence via research that it funded that indicates eons ago the surface of the moon might have looked different from Earth. According to the research the spin axis of the moon shifted by about 5-degrees around 3 billion years ago. Evidence of this movement was found in how ancient lunar ice is distributed seen as evidence of water delivered to the early solar system.

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NASA Ceres low-orbit pics show salt, mountains, shiny craters

NASA Ceres low-orbit pics show salt, mountains, shiny craters

Yesterday, NASA researchers unveiled a bunch of images revealing a close-up look at Ceres, the dwarf planet. These images were captured by the Dawn spacecraft when it was at its lowest orbit, and they include some detailed views of the Occator Crater, as well as the shiny surfaces causing those mysterious bright spots. A color-enhanced map of Ceres has been released, as well as a video explaining different features on the landscape.

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Homes of the future could be powered by old, ugly tomatoes

Homes of the future could be powered by old, ugly tomatoes

Tomatoes: they’re acidic, tasty, and sometimes ugly. The especially ugly tomatoes usually don’t make it to market, at least not in ordinary supermarkets, nor do the ones that were damaged or started to go bad during harvest. This translates into a lot of tomato waste, something our increasingly resource-conscious world finds unfortunate. Enter the American Chemical Society and a new project it has detailed: turning waste tomatoes into biofuel cells.

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Study: prairie dogs are fluffy little serial squirrel killers

Study: prairie dogs are fluffy little serial squirrel killers

Prairie dogs are adorable, yes, but they’d rip your brain out in a sweet second if they were big enough. Such is the conclusion we’ve drawn from a new study on prairie dogs’ homicidal behavior. Researchers observed the critters for a handful of years and during that time discovered the brutal, coldly practical skeleton in a prairie dog's closet: it hunts down and kills baby squirrels so its own offspring can grow up fat and happy.

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Patch monitors glucose levels and delivers meds to control glucose

Patch monitors glucose levels and delivers meds to control glucose

Anyone who has been around a diabetic that has to prick their fingers multiple times a day to check their blood glucose levels can understand in an instant just how difficult and annoying the disease can be. Factor in the need for some diabetics to not only prick fingers to check glucose levels, but to give themselves shots of insulin to control the blood sugar and things only get worse for diabetics. Scientists have developed an innovative medical device that might make diabetes less of a prick.

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NASA explores equipment to keep astronauts fit

NASA explores equipment to keep astronauts fit

NASA is talking up some of the equipment that it has invented for astronauts to use to keep fit while they are on a long duration space missions. To avoid losing muscle and bone mass, astronauts must work out for two hours each day. During the week ISS astronauts have access to three different pieces of workout gear, a bike, a treadmill, and the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device dubbed ARED.

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Flash of a dying star “caught on camera” for the first time

Flash of a dying star “caught on camera” for the first time

We may have images, both static and moving, of stars going boom playing in our head, but actually capturing that brilliant flash of light that heralds the start of a supernova isn't that easy. Even when we're talking about an event that has happened possibly thousands if not millions of years ago. And yet the once defunct Kepler space observatory spacecraft managed to make possible the near impossible, capturing for the first time the so-called shock breakout that precedes the explosion of a dying star.

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Bear bone reveals humans arrived in Ireland earlier than thought

Bear bone reveals humans arrived in Ireland earlier than thought

Humans arrived in Ireland earlier than believed, new research shows. The conclusion comes from the analysis of a bear bone found in a cave in Ireland and was announced this past weekend. According to researchers, humans arrived in Ireland about 2,500 years earlier than previously thought, dating the earliest evidence back to 10,500 BC rather than 8,000 BC.

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DARPA’s TNT program aims to stimulate rapid learning

DARPA’s TNT program aims to stimulate rapid learning

DARPA has a new program that aims to speed up a person’s rate of learning via peripheral nerve stimulation. The agency cites interest in synaptic plasticity and cognitive skills training in particular, and seeks technology able to precisely activate peripheral nerves. The program, dubbed Targeted Neuroplasticity Training (TNT), would reduce the Department of Defense’s training costs and speed up how quickly agents can be equipped with necessary skills and knowledge.

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