Science

Gravitational Waves Appear Again; New Era in Astronomy Begins

Gravitational Waves Appear Again; New Era in Astronomy Begins

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) has made another observation of gravitational waves resulting from one big crash of a couple of black holes. Collision, that is, and merger soon thereafter. This observed signal is dubbed GW151226, while the black whole merger event from late last year goes by the name GW150914. This newest signal was detected by the same set of instruments as the first, 2x instruments of Advanced LIGO situated in Hanford, Washington and Livingston, Louisiana.

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Asymmetric molecule detected in space, points to cosmic origins of life on Earth

Asymmetric molecule detected in space, points to cosmic origins of life on Earth

Researchers have produced evidence of a complex organic molecule in space for the first time. This complex organic molecule's asymmetric structure is the same as molecules found on Earth, the same molecules that are necessary for life as we know it on our planet. "It is a pioneering leap forward in our understanding of how prebiotic molecules are made in the universe and the effects they may have on the origins of life," said Brett McGuire, chemist at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville, Virginia.

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Mars’ history may be filled with explosive volcanoes

Mars’ history may be filled with explosive volcanoes

According to a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Mars may have had explosive volcanoes at some point in its history. Such a conclusion comes via a sample the Mars Curiosity rover took of the landscape, with testing of the sample revealing that it contains a mineral commonly associated with explosive volcanoes: tridymite.

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Superman is the best superhero says 7-year research study

Superman is the best superhero says 7-year research study

Arguments over which superhero would win in a fight are as old as time itself. Cyclops vs Iron Man; Green Lantern vs The Flash; Hulk vs Deadpool; Spider-Man vs Wolverine; and, of course, Superman vs Batman. But what deciding on the single best superhero out of everyone? Students at the UK's University of Leicester have spent seven years researching and applying science to the debate to come up with an answer. To little surprise, it's Superman (sorry Batman).

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Solar Impulse plane lands in New York, completing US leg of global flight

Solar Impulse plane lands in New York, completing US leg of global flight

Solar Impulse 2, which we've written about several times before, is a small, single pilot, solar-powered aircraft making a slow-but-steady flight around the world in order to prove the potential of renewable energy. The plane arrived in New York City in the early hours of Saturday morning, seeing the project complete the US leg of its journey, and celebrating with an iconic flyby of the Statue of Liberty.

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New massive monument found buried in ancient rock city Petra

New massive monument found buried in ancient rock city Petra

Petra, the incredible ancient rock city in Jordan, has long had a massive monument buried under its sands that researchers describe as “hiding in plain sight.” Archaeologists recently discovered the monument using images of the region taken with satellites and drones, as well as photos from ground surveys in the region. Using them, the team found signs of a monument bigger than an Olympic-sized swimming pool and with a design that differs from other buildings in the region.

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Study: sharks have distinct, individual personalities

Study: sharks have distinct, individual personalities

A new study hailing from Macquarie University’s Department of Biological Sciences has found that sharks have individual personalities, and these personalities are consistent across various environments. Many animal species have been found to have individual, distinct personalities (consider your cat, for example); this study marks the first time such distinct individualities have been observed in sharks.

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Pint-sized exoskeleton aims to help kids walk again

Pint-sized exoskeleton aims to help kids walk again

The exoskeleton the little boy in the image here is wearing was created by engineers from the Spanish National Research Council and rather than being designed for adults, this one is designed to help children. Specifically the 26-pound aluminum and titanium exoskeleton aims to help children with spinal muscular atrophy known as SMA. The simple act of walking could help stave off potentially deadly side effects of the disease.

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Science says tall people are more productive at work

Science says tall people are more productive at work

Science has had a lot to say about being tall — studies have shown everything from higher potential earnings throughout one’s life to increased happiness and more. A new study has found that being tall may also be a sign that you’re more productive than your less-tall peers, something based on the long-term monitoring of more than 5300 men in Indonesia. Across a seven-year time span, researchers found that taller men were more productive than shorter peers, something they based on hourly earnings.

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Bionic Leaf is more efficient than photosynthesis

Bionic Leaf is more efficient than photosynthesis

If you remember elementary school science, photosynthesis is the process used to create energy by plants. Scientists Daniel Nocera and Pamela Silver from Harvard have created what they call a bionic leaf that is able to use solar energy to split water molecules and hydrogen-eating bacteria to produce liquid fuel. The system is said to be more efficient than natural photosynthesis.

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Study: archerfish can learn to accurately recognize human faces

Study: archerfish can learn to accurately recognize human faces

Fish are generally regarded as dumb, but maybe that’s not a fair assumption. At least one type of fish, the archerfish, is able to recognize human faces, according to a new study. Researchers with the University of Queensland in Australia and the University of Oxford found that archerfish can learn to recognize different people with a pretty high level of accuracy, doing so despite its lack of a superior visual cortex, the kind found in primates.

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BEAM inflatable ISS module hatch opened for the first time this week

BEAM inflatable ISS module hatch opened for the first time this week

In late March, a resupply capsule lifted off and headed to the ISS and among the gear and supplies on board was the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module known as BEAM. After many weeks of work, the BEAM module was finally inflated and astronaut Jeff Williams entered the BEAM module for the first time this week. Upon entering the new module, Williams checked sensors, installed air ducts, and reported to controllers on Earth that the module was in working order.

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