Science

Big Bang breakthrough as Cosmic contractions spotted

Big Bang breakthrough as Cosmic contractions spotted

A "spectacular" discovery that could explain the Big Bang that created the universe and potentially lead to Nobel prizes for the researchers behind it is prompting excitement in the scientific community, concerning the sudden "inflation" rush in growth in the very first moments of cosmic expansion. Inflation as a theory concerns the initial growth of the universe - measured as a trillionth of a trillionth of a trillionth of a second - fourteen billion years ago, and an American team now says it has identified the lingering remnants of it.

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Chernobyl fall-out slammed brakes on nature says study

Chernobyl fall-out slammed brakes on nature says study

It's been around three decades since the Chernobyl nuclear disaster occurred and the meltdown caused massive evacuations. While effects on the human body and mind are still being contemplated, new studies suggest that the ecosystem around the failed facility may be more affected than believed, with the decaying plant matter left behind not decomposing optimally and indicating significant impact on the natural cycle.

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Crowdsourced Moon maps get accuracy approval

Crowdsourced Moon maps get accuracy approval

Crowdsourcing already gets products off the ground and figures out where traffic congestion is, but CosmoQuest is turning the power of group-work to map the moon. Using high-resolution images beamed back from NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), the public science project allows anybody to register and then sift through, flagging up craters, boulders, and other features of the rocky surface. Now, new research indicates the crowdsourced mapping can be just as accurate as when trained experts do it.

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Tiny fluffy T-Rex roamed the Arctic

Tiny fluffy T-Rex roamed the Arctic

A new species of pygmy Tyrannosaurus Rex only half the size of its closest relative has been identified in northern Alaska, with Nanuqsaurus hoglundi ending up smaller and fluffier than its better-known cousins thanks to the harsh conditions. The dinky dino was likely the top Arctic predator in the late Cretaceous period, paleontologists Anthony R. Fiorillo and Ronald S. Tykoski concluded, measuring around 20 feet long and probably covered in dense fuzzy hair.

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Thermodynamics discovery teases super-dense drives

Thermodynamics discovery teases super-dense drives

New research into the Third Law of Thermodynamics and the odd behaviors of spin ice could have implications for data storage and more, with nanotech scientists finding unexpected behaviors at near-absolute zero. The study, carried out at University College London, created thin films of spin ice - which shows magnetic properties, and normally would be assumed to be the only thing not to fully freeze at absolute zero - for the first time, and then demonstrated how those films could be manipulated.

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9000 year-old masks are the world’s oldest

9000 year-old masks are the world’s oldest

Masks are something that we don’t think much about in the modern world. At certain times of the year, you could walk into just about any retail store in the US and walk out with a mask made of plastic or other materials. Masks have been around much longer than you might think and some of the world's oldest masks are on display in Jerusalem.

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Real-life “Death Stars” deadlier than Darth Vader astronomers find

Real-life “Death Stars” deadlier than Darth Vader astronomers find

Alderaan isn't the only planet to fall victim to the "Death Star", astronomers claim, though the vast O-type stars actually across the galaxy destroying young planets before they've had time to form don't have convenient exhaust ports to stop them. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), a team of US and Canadian researchers discovered that huge quantities of ultraviolet radiation from stars at least 16-times the mass of our own sun can blast away the raw materials for new planetary systems.

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