Science

‘Spooky action’ quantum superpositioning may disprove Einstein

‘Spooky action’ quantum superpositioning may disprove Einstein

A team of scientists may have disproven Einstein by proving quantum superposition. Physics can be difficult to understand, quantum mechanics is even more so. Even Einstein took a "why not both?" approach to tackling the wave and particle behaviors of light. One thing Einstein did not reconcile was particle superposition. Quantum superpositioning is the theory that subatomic particles have the ability to be in more than one state at the same time. Einstein actually didn't give any credence to the theory and dubbed it "spooky action at a distance."

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Mercury’s dark surface may be alien in origin

Mercury’s dark surface may be alien in origin

A paper has been published this week which suggests that the surface of the planet Mercury may be comprised of cometary carbon. This means that carbon has littered the surface of Mercury, all of it from comets hurtling through space. In comparing Mercury to our own Earth-circling moon, the group responsible for this study suggest that 50 times as many carbon-rich micrometeorites impact the dark planet as do our own nearby space body. This has resulted, says the study, in approximately 3–6 wt% carbon at Mercury’s surface.

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X-ray wind from black hole blows away star forming materials

X-ray wind from black hole blows away star forming materials

The image you see here is an artist's representation of what scientists think it would look like closer to a black hole as the raw materials needed to make stars are blown away from the black hole. A new study was published this week that shows a link between the X-Ray wind created by supermassive black hole in the center of a galaxy and the dispersal of raw materials that could be used to form stars.

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DARPA working on new GPS systems that needs no satellites

DARPA working on new GPS systems that needs no satellites

DARPA is always working on developing new technologies to help the military perform tasks that will protect the country and often that tech spills over into civilian life as well. One of the things that DARPA is working on right now is a reinvention of the GPS system that doesn't rely on satellites. This reinvention is part of DARPA's goal of ensuring American superiority in the air, maritime, ground, space, and cyber domains.

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New graphene lightbulb available soon this year in retail

New graphene lightbulb available soon this year in retail

A new graphene lightbulb hopes to unseat traditional LED's from their market dominance. LED bulbs slowly started replacing incandescent bulbs as countries began legislation to phase out the traditional filament bulbs in favor of LEDs. In some countries, the legislation is so strict, that cheaper incandescents are not only nowhere to be found, but illegal to import as well. Such policies were made with good intentions as LED bulbs consume less energy and last longer, which is good for the environment. This new graphene lightbulb still relies LED technology, and adds the strength of graphene molecules to create a bulb that should outlast any traditional LED.

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Researchers: Antarctic ice shelves melting spiked in the last decade

Researchers: Antarctic ice shelves melting spiked in the last decade

Some researchers have undertaken a big effort to monitor the rate of Antarctic ice selves melting, and what they've found again shows that the ice is melting faster than ever before, particularly in the last decade when a spike in the rate was observed. Such information comes from a recent study detailing work done by a research team headed by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. According to the newly published study, the rate of ice shelf melting in some areas has increased by 18-percent over the past nearly 20 years, and there's no signs of that slowing down.

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One-year NASA mission launch: watch LIVE as Soyuz takes off

One-year NASA mission launch: watch LIVE as Soyuz takes off

Starting today, NASA's Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko will be heading off for a year in space aboard the International Space Station. While Padalka's mission will be slightly shorter at a standard six months, a full year in space is planned for Kelly and Kornienko. This mission will test the long-term spaceflight effects on the human body in both physiological and psychological terms. Scott Kelly is also part of a twin study - his (retired) brother Mark Kelly will be remaining on Earth to be studied by NASA as the mission takes place in space.

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The hunt for dark matter: NASA’s Hubble, Chandra uncover new clues

The hunt for dark matter: NASA’s Hubble, Chandra uncover new clues

Astronomers have uncovered new clues about the nature of mysterious dark matter using NASA's Hubble telescope and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The newest discovery is that dark matter doesn't decelerate when it collides against other dark matter. Previous theories held dark matter to be more interactive. If this new information is correct, it could eliminate some previous theories about the behavior of dark matter. For example: because dark matter doesn't slow down when it collides with itself, theories relying on strong friction are out the window.

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Researchers create new form of ice using graphene sheets

Researchers create new form of ice using graphene sheets

Researchers have managed to create a new type of ice, something that results from using a couple sheets of graphene to flatten a drop of water. This is done on the microscopic level, and the new type of ice is called "square ice", referring to the square grid-like pattern of the atoms. The ice is created at room temperature, which makes it all the more notable, and follows an initial discovery made back in 2012 when a team of researchers noted that water vapor will pass through graphene oxide, but not helium gas or related gases.

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Students create bass-blasting extinguisher to put out fires

Students create bass-blasting extinguisher to put out fires

A pair of students have developed a modern version of the trusty and ever-handy fire extinguisher, and it's a rendition that is sure to titillate dubstep lovers far and wide: it uses a blast of bass to put out the flames. The extinguisher was made by engineering students Seth Robertson and Viet Tran, who funded the creation themselves and used it as a class project for a senior-level class. The result is a 20lb hand-held device that puts out flames without making a mess, and that has the potential to aid in putting out big fires.

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