Science

FDA finds parmesan cut with wood pulp, cheaper cheeses

FDA finds parmesan cut with wood pulp, cheaper cheeses

As if it weren't bad enough that most olive oil is adulterated, a newly surfaced report from the FDA reveals that some parmesan cheese being sold by big-name stores and brands may not be parmesan cheese at all -- in some cases, the cheese has been cut with wood pulp or other (much cheaper) cheeses like cheddar. The beans were spilled (so to speak) after the Food and Drug Administration received a tip that led to a Pennsylvania cheese factory in late 2012. The location was Castle Cheese Inc, according to the documents, and it was found to be cutting its products with cheaper substitutions, changes that weren’t noted on the resulting product labels.

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Quartz discs used to store 360TB of data, for up to 14 billion years

Quartz discs used to store 360TB of data, for up to 14 billion years

Back when I was in school, the only way to transfer data from home was on a floppy disk. Sure, you might have a CD burner at home, but the discs were rather expensive. Floppies were fine, because the only things you'd really save were documents and some Clipart for your book report. The real downside to floppies is they were terrible at actually retaining data. But what if you had a way to store files that would last 14 billion years?

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3D bioprinter used to print a transplantable human ear

3D bioprinter used to print a transplantable human ear

Scientists have developed a new 3D bioprinter that has been successfully used to print a replacement human ear that could be transplanted to a patient in need. A human ear isn't all that the scientists have used the 3D printer to create, so far the team has created part of a jawbone, muscle, and cartilage structures in addition to the ear. The team is led by Anthony Atala from the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine and the printer is the result of almost a decade of work.

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Giant ‘gastornis’ bird definitely roamed Arctic 53m years ago

Giant ‘gastornis’ bird definitely roamed Arctic 53m years ago

A giant flightless bird called 'gastornis' did, in fact, roam the Arctic some 50 million years ago, researchers have confirmed. The proof? A fossilized toe bone from one of the birds, which had weighed several hundred pounds, was several feet tall, and had a head as big as that of a horse. University of Colorado Boulder and Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing researchers made the confirmation.

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Ancient asterid flowers found fossilized in amber

Ancient asterid flowers found fossilized in amber

A pair of ancient asterids have been found fossilized in a piece of amber, researchers have revealed. This marks the first instance of an asterid — a type of flower — being found in a fossilized state. Researchers describe the flower as being “perfectly preserved” as a fossil, and they say it was probably poisonous as it comes from the genus Strychnos. The fossils are estimated to be between 20 and 30 million years old.

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Watch live: bald eagle eggs will hatch next month

Watch live: bald eagle eggs will hatch next month

The U.S. National Arboretum and American Eagle Foundation (AEF) have teamed up to install “the most patriotic eagle nest cam” ever — a webcam live streaming from the “Mr. President” and “The First Lady” eagles’ nest at the National Arboretum. These bald eagles are nesting in the arboretum in Washington D.C., where “The First Lady” laid the couple’s first egg of the year on February 10, then a second egg on Valentine’s Day. If all goes as planned, the eggs will hatch next month, and the public will be able to see it happen live.

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Impoverished childhood may plant compulsion for overeating

Impoverished childhood may plant compulsion for overeating

Living in poverty during early childhood could result in a sort of “biological blueprint” that makes one prone to overeating later on in life, according to a new study. It is known that childhood poverty is an obesity risk factor, and researchers recently explored that fact, seeking to find the reason why. While that question has still not been conclusively answered, the researchers found a compulsion among those who were raised in poverty to eat when food is available rather than only when they are hungry.

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Wasp GPS could help smart drones find home faster

Wasp GPS could help smart drones find home faster

A decade of research figuring out how wasps navigate could help drones and self-piloting robots fly smarter, researchers in Australia claim, having concluded that once again nature has proved itself smarter than human inventors. The team examined the flight behaviors of ground-nesting wasps, which can fly significant distances but still find their way back home after foraging.

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DARPA FLA program for autonomous drones flight tests begin

DARPA FLA program for autonomous drones flight tests begin

DARPA has announced that it has begun flight testing in its latest drone program called Fast Lightweight Autonomy (FLA) and the initial round of tests was a success. The goal of FLA is to create small autonomous aircraft with sensors that allow the drones to avoid obstacles while achieving a desired speed of 20 meters per seconds. The main goal of the program is to develop and test algorithms that reduce the processing power, communications and human intervention needed for UAVs to perform certain low-level tasks.

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Network researchers achieve fastest ever data rate at 1.125 Tb/s

Network researchers achieve fastest ever data rate at 1.125 Tb/s

Researchers at University College London (UCL) have set a record for the fastest ever data rate for digital information. As part of research focusing on testing the capacity limits of optical transmission systems the team of researchers from the optical Networks Group achieved a data rate of 1.125 Tb/s. The research the team performs is part of efforts to increase the available data speeds for network systems in homes and businesses.

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DARPA is launching an autonomous, submarine-hunting robot ship in April

DARPA is launching an autonomous, submarine-hunting robot ship in April

As the division of the US military most responsible high-tech developments, DARPA has announced that April will the launch of a futuristic ship that is designed to detect and fight submarines at sea. But the thing is, the ship doesn't even have a crew; it's completely autonomous. That means it's basically a robotic, submarine-hunting drone yacht. Unfortunately, because it's the military, they have to give it an acronym for its long, ridiculous name, instead of just calling it an "autonomous submarine hunter."

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ISS commander, astronaut Scott Kelly answering questions live on Tumblr right now

ISS commander, astronaut Scott Kelly answering questions live on Tumblr right now

If you've ever wanted to participate in a live, Reddit AMA (Ask Me Anything)-like session with an astronaut in space, your chance is RIGHT NOW. All you have to do is head on over to Tumblr, where NASA astronaut, and current commander of the International Space Station, Scott Kelly is answering questions from space. He's participating in an "Answer Time" session, or Tumblr's take on the AMA, where readers can ask any question they like, with the chance Kelly will respond.

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