Science

Astral Beauty: Gravitational microlensing spots first Exomoon

Astral Beauty: Gravitational microlensing spots first Exomoon

Astronomers have caught a glimpse of an exomoon for the first time, with a rare space line-up allowing complex telescope tech to catch a never-to-be-repeated sighting. Astral bodies like planets and moons lying outside our Solar System are referred to as exoplanets and exomoons. Scientists use a technique called gravitational microlensing to view these bodies, with the trick to observing them accurately being picking a time when all the stars are aligned in space.

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NASA Veggie project will grow vegetables in the International Space Station

NASA Veggie project will grow vegetables in the International Space Station

The one thing that Howard Wolowitz of The Big Bang Theory missed during his space mission was eating his greens, joking aside however, there is a grain of truth in here, astronauts at the International Space Station do miss eating vegetables and some of them even relate to having plants around as their earth-connection. To help expand on the in-orbit food production capabilities onboard the ISS, NASA will be sending across the 'Veggie' – a plant growth chamber – via the Dragon Capsule.

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Segue 1 dwarf galaxy hints at universe’s first stars

Segue 1 dwarf galaxy hints at universe’s first stars

The Segue 1, referred to as the "least chemically evolved galaxy known," could hint at the universe's very first stars, according to researchers who recently studied the tiny galaxy. Among all known galaxies, Segue 1 has significantly fewer stars and less heavy elements, revealing an estimated end to its evolution 13 billion years ago.

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Researchers power scale model P-51 Mustang with fuel created from seawater

Researchers power scale model P-51 Mustang with fuel created from seawater

Being able to turn water into fuel for vehicles is something that has been a dream of researchers for decades. A team of researchers at the US Naval Research Laboratory, Materials and Science division, have demonstrated a proof of concept for a fuel created from seawater. The team developed a process for the recovery of carbon dioxide and hydrogen from seawater that was then converted into a liquid hydrocarbon fuel.

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Duke researchers create self-healing lab grown muscle

Duke researchers create self-healing lab grown muscle

Researchers from Duke University have made a break through with artificial lab grown muscle tissue. The team has created an artificial muscle that is able to contract powerfully and rapidly while being able to be successfully integrated into mice in tests. One of the coolest aspects of this artificial muscle is that the fibers are able to heal themselves.

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Saturn’s moon Enceladus may have ocean the size of Lake Superior under frozen surface

Saturn’s moon Enceladus may have ocean the size of Lake Superior under frozen surface

Scientists are looking at a number of celestial bodies in our solar system as potential habitats for life. One of the spots that we are looking at is one of Saturn's moons called Enceladus. This moon is particularly interesting because it is known to spew water into space. Gravity measurements suggest that the moon has an ocean between its rocky core and the icy shell that is about the size of Lake Superior.

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Microbes blamed for Earth’s biggest mass-extinction

Microbes blamed for Earth’s biggest mass-extinction

The biggest mass extinction known to affect Earth likely had the smallest of causes, scientists at MIT have concluded, blaming microbes for killing out around 90-percent of every species on the planet 252 million years ago. The huge wipe-out - which, it had previously been speculated, could have been the result of an asteroid strike or uncontrollable volcanic eruptions - was, new fossil research indicates, the result of vast quantities of carbon dioxide or methane changing ocean chemistry and throwing the climate into a tailspin.

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