Science

Pain killer patch releases ibuprofen over 12 hours

Pain killer patch releases ibuprofen over 12 hours

Ibuprofen can be seen as one of the most useful medications available today; just two to four pills of the pain killer can help treat headaches to muscle pain. But researchers may have just improved its effectiveness by developing the world's first ibuprofen patch capable of releasing the drug over a 12 hour period once applied to the skin. That sounds much better than having to remember to take the pills every four hours or so.

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Researchers make rechargeable energy-storing paper

Researchers make rechargeable energy-storing paper

Researchers at Linkoping University have created a new type of paper they call “power paper” that is able to store energy. In addition to storing energy, this paper — which is made from nano cellulose and a conductive polymer — can also be recharged. Power paper, despite its abilities, is made from polymer said to be “easily available”, and the cellulose itself is renewable. This could lead to more sustainable, environmentally friendly ways of storing energy that are safer than existing battery technology.

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Alphabet spins Google life sciences into Verily

Alphabet spins Google life sciences into Verily

Google's smart contact lens has been given a company of its own, with Alphabet announcing Verily, its life sciences arm. The new company will take the reins of former Google[x] projects like the glucose-measuring contact lens, attempting to understand and predict diseases using the power of big data, and developing bio-molecular nanotechnology.

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Spanish ship wreckage found with billions in treasure

Spanish ship wreckage found with billions in treasure

Colombia has announced the discovery of a long-lost Spanish galleon (ship) containing billions of dollars’ worth of gemstones, gold, and silver. It’s an incredibly exciting announcement, but not one without controversy. The galleon, called San Jose, has been the subject of legal battles for a while now, with U.S. company Sea Search Armada claiming to have found the ship’s site back in 1981.

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You’re going to Mars, I went to NASA

You’re going to Mars, I went to NASA

I woke up at 5:30 AM after a string of nightmares about being left alone on a dusty red planet. Like a fool I'd eaten a gigantic piece of chocolate cake the night before while watching a set of tiny teaser clips of "The Martian" to mentally prepare for the next day, which was then, now, today. "It's OK," I told myself. "Stay calm. You're in Houston. You're on East NASA Parkway in the same hotel you'd checked in to the day before. Today you're going to go on a brief ride in a Mars rover and talk to an astronaut."

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New Orbital ATK Cygnus launched to bring science equipment to ISS

New Orbital ATK Cygnus launched to bring science equipment to ISS

Recent rocket launches like that of the Super Strypi in Hawaii have been met with accidents and failure, leading to the lost of valuable, not to mention expensive, equipment. So when Orbital ATK's enhanced Cygnus rocket launches successfully, carrying 7,000 lbs worth of scientific tools and machines, NASA and Orbital definitely have reason to rejoice. The rocket is headed to the ISS to deliver its scientific payload, along with other interesting gadgets, and hang around for a month before plummeting to its death back to Earth.

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Laser-Induced graphene supercapacitors may be the future of wearables

Laser-Induced graphene supercapacitors may be the future of wearables

Last year researchers at Rice University announced that they had been able to develop a way to produce graphene usiang a computer-controlled laser in the process. The resulting product was dubbed laser-induced graphene (LIG). Since developing the material, the researchers are now proposing that it might be a suitable replacement for batteries inside wearable electronic devices.

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New Horizons images shows off Pluto’s mountains

New Horizons images shows off Pluto’s mountains

Last summer the New Horizons spacecraft made its closest pass by the dwarf planet Pluto. The spacecraft is still sending back data and images and the latest images to be released by NASA are now available. These images show part of a sequence of images that were snapped near the probe's closest approach to Pluto and have resolution of 250-280 feet.

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Bio-ink used to print ‘living’ blood vessels

Bio-ink used to print ‘living’ blood vessels

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have 3D printed living blood vessels using a “bio-ink” — that is, a mash of materials that the human body finds agreeable. Using this ink, principal investigator Monica Moya and team have printed blood vessels that lead to further growth of capillaries. Said Moya, "This technology can take biology from the traditional petri dish to a 3D physiologically relevant tissue patch with functional vasculature."

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Spotted, a Dark Matter creche and its monstrous baby galaxies

Spotted, a Dark Matter creche and its monstrous baby galaxies

A creche of monstrous baby galaxies, swaddled in dark matter and billions of light years from Earth, could help answer questions about how the known universe formed. Monstrous galaxies, rapid stellar incubators, are no longer a feature of the universe, though ten billion years ago they pumped out new stars up to thousands of times the rate of current production.

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ESA astronaut Tim Peake will run London Marathon on ISS

ESA astronaut Tim Peake will run London Marathon on ISS

For many people, being on the International Space Station would be a good excuse to put off running that marathon you’ve been planning for a few years. Not so for ESA astronaut Tim Peake who plans to run the London Marathon next April…from space. He’ll do so on a treadmill located in the International Space Station’s Tranquility Node while a medical team keeps tabs on his health to make sure nothing goes awry.

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