Science

Researchers create new form of ice using graphene sheets

Researchers create new form of ice using graphene sheets

Researchers have managed to create a new type of ice, something that results from using a couple sheets of graphene to flatten a drop of water. This is done on the microscopic level, and the new type of ice is called "square ice", referring to the square grid-like pattern of the atoms. The ice is created at room temperature, which makes it all the more notable, and follows an initial discovery made back in 2012 when a team of researchers noted that water vapor will pass through graphene oxide, but not helium gas or related gases.

Continue Reading

Students create bass-blasting extinguisher to put out fires

Students create bass-blasting extinguisher to put out fires

A pair of students have developed a modern version of the trusty and ever-handy fire extinguisher, and it's a rendition that is sure to titillate dubstep lovers far and wide: it uses a blast of bass to put out the flames. The extinguisher was made by engineering students Seth Robertson and Viet Tran, who funded the creation themselves and used it as a class project for a senior-level class. The result is a 20lb hand-held device that puts out flames without making a mess, and that has the potential to aid in putting out big fires.

Continue Reading

CERN’s LHC is delayed by repairs before its 2nd run

CERN’s LHC is delayed by repairs before its 2nd run

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is preparing for its second run in Switzerland, but it has it some snags along the way. This second round of collisions will use particle beams operating at 6.5 TeV, which is much higher energy than the collider's first run. Although seven out of eight machine sectors are considered ready to go, one sector has encountered a problem which will need to be repaired before any further preparation for the collider's next run. The necessary corrections could delay the LHC's second run by a few weeks.

Continue Reading

Researchers find shape-shifting frogs in the Andes

Researchers find shape-shifting frogs in the Andes

Researchers have discovered shape-shifting frogs in the Ecuadorian Andes, it has been announced. The frogs are able to change the look of their skin within the span of a few minutes to imitate a surface they are sitting upon, making them what is thought to be the first amphibian discovered with such an ability. The species is called Pristimantis mutabilis, which means "mutable rainfrog", and its shape-shifting revolves around the texture of its skin, which can go from mostly smooth to "high tubercular".

Continue Reading

Behold, the 50-year-old Corned Beef Sandwich in Space

Behold, the 50-year-old Corned Beef Sandwich in Space

What an odd thing to memorialize - but there it is. The 50th anniversary of the first (and last) corned-beef sandwich to fly through space. Back on the 23rd of March, 1964, NASA launched their first two-man space mission Gemini 3. Two hours into the flight, astronaut John Young pulled a corned beef sandwich out of his space suit pocket. It was a joke, or a "gotcha" as his partner called them - but a joke that turned deadly serious not long after his epic sandwich-heavy space-prank was revealed.

Continue Reading

Russian space tourist flights to ISS to resume

Russian space tourist flights to ISS to resume

For a long time the only way for normal people to get into space was to pay the Russians big bucks for a seat in the Soyuz capsule on its way to the ISS. The Russians allowed eight people to catch a ride to the ISS between 2001 and 2009. Private passengers weren't able to go to the ISS with the Russian state space agency after NASA and other space agencies needed to use the seat to get their own astronauts to the ISS.

Continue Reading

Real Jurassic Park? Woolly mammoth genes spliced into elephant DNA

Real Jurassic Park? Woolly mammoth genes spliced into elephant DNA

Harvard scientists are using a process called "de-extinction" to bring species that were once extinct back from the dead, starting with the woolly mammoth. The Harvard University research team, led by George Church, has taken woolly mammoth genes retrieved from actual frozen remains and spliced them into the genes of an Asian elephant. Church isn't the first to attempt to bring the woolly mammoth species back to life, but he may be the first to get the mammoth genes to function tangibly in over 5,000 years.

Continue Reading

Curiosity’s latest Mars find: “biologically useful” nitrogen

Curiosity’s latest Mars find: “biologically useful” nitrogen

Despite the recent resurfaced scandal surrounding Mars One, it's business as usual for those working on the real and present-day Mars. That doesn't mean, however, that NASA's scientists don't have anything just as spectacular but even more scientifically sound. From the results gathered by Curiosity Rover's "Sample Analysis at Mars" equipment, or SAM, researchers discovered the presence of nitrogen, quite a lot of them. While this alone might be boring, it's the nature of those nitrogen molecules that are more interesting. These particular molecules are a type of nitrogen that could have very well been useful to organic life.

Continue Reading

New Ebola-proof tablet designed for medical field workers

New Ebola-proof tablet designed for medical field workers

Ebola field doctors' need for an "Ebola-proof" tablet is finally filled. Hose it down with de-contaminating bleach, and all of the data will still be safe as its virus-free exterior. Here's something you probably never considered about the world's Ebola outbreaks: How can doctors and nurses keep track of patient data when every piece of paper, pen, and clipboard becomes contaminated just by being in the hot zone? As it turns out, according to Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF), the doctors were shouting patient data over makeshift barricades to avoid spreading the contagion.

Continue Reading

Jupiter believed to have destroyed v1.0 of our solar system

Jupiter believed to have destroyed v1.0 of our solar system

You know something — Jupiter is huge. Like, really big. Turns out, it might be a bully, too. Like something out of The Matrix, two scientists now believe Jupiter actually destroyed version 1.0 of our solar system. Giving in to the Sun’s pull, Jupiter is believed to have come in and just obliterated other planets in our earlier solar system. The scientists point to strange quirks within our solar system as reason for their belief Jupiter was a cue-ball for an earlier version of our planetary scheme, and it makes quite a bit of sense!

Continue Reading