Science

New laser tech may give science the ability to control the weather

New laser tech may give science the ability to control the weather

A study has been published that outlines a method of creating a laser beam that can travel further than lasers were previously able to travel. Researchers from the University of Arizona have developed a way to increase the distance the laser can travel in air by encasing it in the beam of light of another laser. The process is described as being similar to wrapping a wire in an insulating layer.

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B612 says Earth avoids massive asteroids with “blind luck”

B612 says Earth avoids massive asteroids with “blind luck”

With Earth Day round the bend, you’d expect to hear some positive news regarding our planet and the celestial bodies that surround it; instead we have some not-so-good-news. According to former NASA astronauts, we're depending on "blind luck" when it comes to the asteroids avoiding our planet. Apparently we get hit three to ten times more by large-scale asteroids than what is being officially declared by the authorities, this information being brought forward by this trio of space-fairing fellows this week.

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Raindrops and toilets can potentially power your home

Raindrops and toilets can potentially power your home

Scientist from South Korea have a found a way to harness power from a flushing toilet to generate electricity. Technically the application can be extended from toilet flushes to rainwater, ocean waves, river currents, even to a drop of water. However, it sounds way cooler when we say that the mechanical energy from flowing water in your toilet bowl can potentially power your home.

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SpaceX CRS-3 Falcon 9 launches for ISS resupply mission

SpaceX CRS-3 Falcon 9 launches for ISS resupply mission

SpaceX has successfully launched its CRS-3 Mission, the second attempt to send the Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft to the International Space Station and further demonstrate the effectiveness of its reusable technology. The launch - scratched earlier in the week - will take a number of specialist devices and equipment to the ISS, including a new laser communication array, and high-resolution cameras which will give viewers new glimpse of Earth from orbit.

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SlashGear 101: What is NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope?

SlashGear 101: What is NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope?

NASA's big news today is the first ever sighting of an Earth-sized planet orbiting a star in the "habitable zone", but it's not the first time the Kepler Space Telescope has caught sight of a potentially intriguing distant rock. The space observatory has already cataloged almost 1,000 exoplanets spread across 76 different stellar systems, though Kepler-186f has the unique privilege of being the first "Earth cousin" spotted.

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NASA has found the first potentially habitable Earth-cousin

NASA has found the first potentially habitable Earth-cousin

NASA's Kepler Space Telescope has made a planet-spotting breakthrough, catching sight of the first Earth-size planet orbiting a star in the so-called "habitable zone" where liquid water could be supported. Dubbed Kepler-186f, and around 500 light years away from our own Earth, the new planet is found in the constellation Cygnus; however, while it may be in the habitable zone in theory, it would be dimmer and probably cooler on the surface than Earth is.

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Cassini spacecraft spies evidence of a new moon in Saturn’s rings

Cassini spacecraft spies evidence of a new moon in Saturn’s rings

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has been studying Saturn for a long time. The spacecraft spied something interesting making its way through the rings of the giant planet. Cassini spied a disturbance in the A ring, which is the outer most ring of the planet's bright and large rings. Scientists have determined that the disturbance is an arc that is about 20% brighter than its surroundings.

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