Science

New edible six-pack holders are just what the environment needs

New edible six-pack holders are just what the environment needs

We all know that the rings on a six-pack can be dangerous. No, you're not going to injure yourself taking out a can. However, once discarded, it can cause some serious issues for various wildlife that can get trapped inside the rings. But one company wants to ensure that never happens again.

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New Hubble image of Mars shows details 20-30 miles across

New Hubble image of Mars shows details 20-30 miles across

The Hubble space telescope may be aged, but it still takes some of the most spectacular images of our solar system that you will ever see. NASA has shown off a new image of Mars taken by Hubble and it is high resolution showing off detail on the surface of Mars as small as 20-30 miles across. It never ceases to amaze that the Hubble Space Telescope can snap pictures that detailed of a planet that is 50 million miles from Earth.

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April was the 12th consecutive ‘hottest’ recorded month

April was the 12th consecutive ‘hottest’ recorded month

Every month brings the same news -- that month was the new 'hottest' month on record, edging past the previous month to paint a dire picture for the planet's climate. Soon enough, the record-breaking had formed a trend, and now NOAA has confirmed the news: we’ve officially had a year-long streak of record-breaking warm weather. The temps were detailed in NOAA’s latest State of the Climate report.

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Spiders’ sticky ‘glue’ also acts as microscopic web spools

Spiders’ sticky ‘glue’ also acts as microscopic web spools

Spiders create a special sort of ‘hybrid’ substance for their web that keeps the silky threads taunt even after they’re stretched out, according to researchers, and that discovery has been used to create a so-called liquid wire with the same properties. The spider’s substance is described as a watery glue deposited in tiny drops onto the threads; when a piece of silk is pulled on or stretched out, it spools within the droplets, keeping the threads taunt and thusly maintaining the structure of the web.

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Israeli divers find ancient Roman treasure in shipwreck remains

Israeli divers find ancient Roman treasure in shipwreck remains

A team of Israeli divers have discovered a cache of ancient Roman treasure within the remains of a shipwreck, the nation has announced. A pair of divers made the discovery back in April, finding the remains of a shipwreck in an ancient Roman port, and further investigation by the Israel Antiquities Authority revealed a cache of ancient treasures…most of which is in surprisingly good shape considering how long it spent underwater.

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NASA software ‘clones’ machine parts to predict breakdowns

NASA software ‘clones’ machine parts to predict breakdowns

The breakdown of machine parts always has the potential to create serious problems, whether it be in something like a car, or a piece of equipment such as a telescope. And when it comes to essential moving parts, like those in, say, a helicopter, a failure can put lives at risk. But a new piece of software from the NASA-owned subsidiary Sentient Science offers a solution by "cloning" these parts and predicting breakdowns before they happen.

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This quadcopter drone can land on ceilings and walls

This quadcopter drone can land on ceilings and walls

We've seen consumer drones of various sizes, as well as those with varying camera and photography capabilities, but what about when it comes to landing on surfaces other than the ground? Research students at Stanford University have been exploring that exact idea, and have developed a quadcopter that can perch on the ceiling, as well as walls in a vertical position, just like a spider or insect.

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Ontario bill will make parents take a class to get vaccine exemptions

Ontario bill will make parents take a class to get vaccine exemptions

Before getting a vaccination exemption, parents in Ontario may first have to attend an educational class teaching them about vaccines, what they are, and why they are important. Such is the foundation of new legislation recently introduced in the region, and it aims to reduce the number of parents who choose to skip vaccines over fears about autism, random conspiracy theories, and other concerns.

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Origami robot is able to unfold and treat stomach injuries when swallowed

Origami robot is able to unfold and treat stomach injuries when swallowed

Researchers from the University of Sheffield, Tokyo Institute of Technology, and MIT have teamed up to demonstrate a new foldable origami robot that can be ingested and then controlled inside the stomach to treat internal wounds or remove things like button batteries from the stomach. Button batteries are at times swallowed by children and can cause great injury if left alone. The ingestible robot starts in a digestible capsule that is swallowed.

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Ax fragment found in Australia is world’s oldest

Ax fragment found in Australia is world’s oldest

The world’s oldest ax fragment has been discovered in Western Australia, researchers have announced. The fragment is very small, being only about the size of a dime or a fingernail, but it shows a distinct shape and polish that hints at its past life — as a tool used during the Stone Age by humans to make life a bit easier. According to researchers, the tool hints that these newly-arrived humans were technically inclined and able to craft items for use in the rather inhospitable Australian wild.

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The ISS is full of microbes, and NASA may get a shipment of them today

The ISS is full of microbes, and NASA may get a shipment of them today

The International Space Station is home to all manner of experiments, being used to test everything from how plants grow in space to how whiskey is affected. The ISS is also home to to various Earth microbes that are being exposed to a microgravity environment, presenting researchers with a chance to study how such an environment affects them. The space agency is performing a three-part study on these microbes, and it might get its final batch in a shipment from space today.

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Teen finds lost Mayan city using his own star map discovery

Teen finds lost Mayan city using his own star map discovery

A 15-year-old Canadian teenager has seemingly discovered a long-lost Mayan city after noticing previously-undiscovered correlations between maps of star constellations and the locations of the largest (known) Mayan cities. At some point William Gadoury realized that the two matched up — something, apparently, no one had ever noticed before. After using his discovery to match 117 Mayan cities with 22 star constellations, he discovered that one was missing…and, soon after, satellites revealed that he had probably pinpointed it correctly on a map.

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