Science

NASA’s New Horizons teases with Pluto pic ahead of July flyby

NASA’s New Horizons teases with Pluto pic ahead of July flyby

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft will be making a historic flyby of Pluto mid-summer this year, and it’ll be capturing during the process humanity’s first close up photographs (and relevant scientific data) of the planet. It will be three months from now before the spacecraft will shuttle its images of Pluto back to its creators on Earth, but in the meantime we’ve a relatively low resolution color image from the spacecraft, the first one it took of both Pluto and Charon, its moon.

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First DES dark matter map reveals the invisible

First DES dark matter map reveals the invisible

The Dark Energy Survey has published its first dark matter map, something that will eventually be joined by more maps comprising a series. The series will feature the most detailed contiguous maps of their size, and they aim to improve scientific understanding of how dark matter influences or otherwise is involved in galaxy formation. With them, we are able to see what is otherwise invisible, a picture that will grow over the next five years for which the program is slated.

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LIVE Countdown to SpaceX CRS-6 launch and landing mission

LIVE Countdown to SpaceX CRS-6 launch and landing mission

For the third time in so many days, the SpaceX group will be attempting to launch mission CRS-6. This mission will be the first to recapture the section of the rocket normally lost once separated from the payload, thus creating an environment in which space travel - and the delivery of goods and astronauts to the International Space Station - has its costs lessened significantly. Today there is a 60-percent chance of a successful mission launch, while yesterday's launch was canceled by an anvil cloud.

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SpaceX landing scrubbed due to anvil cloud

SpaceX landing scrubbed due to anvil cloud

This afternoon SpaceX aborted its second attempt to land a rocket on a ship at sea. This would have been - and still might be - a historic landing, if completed successfully, as it would make the Falcon 9 the first such craft to deliver goods to the International Space Station and return intact and fully reusable. Similar such craft have been successful in heading to space, but once returned, they're pretty much done for. SpaceX intends to reduce the price of space travel significantly with this giant leap forward.

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Little boy finds big dinosaur fossil under future mall

Little boy finds big dinosaur fossil under future mall

The son of a zookeeper, Wylie Brys, discovered no less than a 100-million year old dinosaur bone whilst digging in the dirt this past September. The report is coming out now because between September 2014 and now, April of 2015, preparations have been underway to excavate and remove the fossil. Excavation took place over the past two days and the bone - or bones, as it turned out - were removed just today. The finding began back in September when Brys and his father were digging for fish bones in the area where a mall was set to be built.

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SpaceX retries drone-ship rocket landing after first fiery failure

SpaceX retries drone-ship rocket landing after first fiery failure

As instructions for space flight go, "Just Read the Instructions" seems like basic advice, but that's the last thing SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket will see as it coaxes down onto a floating landing pad today. Elon Musk's ambitious private space flight project is set to send another unmanned Dragon capsule to the International Space Station with a fresh batch of cargo, but the arguably more interesting flight is a whole lot shorter and will end much closer to home.

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Researchers might finally have a fix for the color blind

Researchers might finally have a fix for the color blind

Despite our many advancements in technology, there are still some biological matters that continue to confound and befuddle us. It might come as a surprise to many that color blindness, a condition that affects more than 10 million in the US alone, is one of those. But hopefully not anymore. Jay and Maureen Neitz, husband and wife researchers from the University of Washington, may finally have a way to fix this genetic mutation to help those affected by it to see in color again. And it won't even require surgery.

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