Science

NASA wants to solve Hot Jupiter exoplanet mystery

NASA wants to solve Hot Jupiter exoplanet mystery

One of the mysteries of the universe that NASA really wants to solve has to do with a type of exoplanet called a hot Jupiter. These planets are gas giants like Jupiter in our solar system, only they are much hotter thanks to orbiting very close to their parent stars. Scientist assumed for a long time that our solar system was the norm, but with more and more hot Jupiter planets discovered, it turns out our solar system is the odd ball in the universe.

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Arctic sea ice hits a record low, second year in a row

Arctic sea ice hits a record low, second year in a row

NASA declared January this year as the warmest month, displacing last year's record. It wasn't just living creatures, however, who were affected by the heat. Unsurprisingly, the volume of ice in our polar regions, particularly the Arctic north, were drastically affected as well. While frozen seawater normally expands during the fall and winter months, NASA has measured the Arctic sea ice area at 5.607 million square miles. While that may still sound big, it's slightly lower than that 5.612 million square miles from last year, making it the lowest recorded number since 1979.

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Researchers find ‘frog foam’ can be used to treat wounds

Researchers find ‘frog foam’ can be used to treat wounds

It sounds a bit icky, but researchers are happy about it. The protein foam produced by Tungara frogs while mating is fully compatible with human cells, it turns out, and could be an excellent way to treat wounds -- particularly burns -- in the future. Such a discovery was made by with the University of Strathclyde, who found that the frog’s foam is “highly stable” and can be used to slow-release antibiotics and other medication.

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Mammoth skull found in Oklahoma sand pit

Mammoth skull found in Oklahoma sand pit

A giant mammoth skull has been unearthed in an Oklahoma sand pit, as well as fragments from a pair of tusks and some teeth. The skull is described as "partial," in that there are some pieces missing. However, images show that it is largely intact and is easily recognizable as a skull. No other skeletal parts are present around the skull, and there are no "cultural associations," according to the Oklahoma Archaeological Survey.

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Researchers show off first ever quantum Fredkin gate

Researchers show off first ever quantum Fredkin gate

Researchers working together from the University of Queensland and Griffith University have demonstrated a key quantum logic operation that is required for quantum computing to move forward. The team demonstrated for the first time a quantum Fredkin gate powered by entanglement that operates on photonic qubits. One of the key challenges to creating a quantum computer has been in the need to minimize the resources needed to implement processing circuits.

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MIT hacked a Xbox Kinect to create a reflection-free camera

MIT hacked a Xbox Kinect to create a reflection-free camera

When taking photos, whether it be of sights or people, sometimes shooting through a window is unavoidable, and that means there's probably going to be glare or reflections. Turns out, researchers at MIT's Media Lab are looking to address this, as their Camera Culture Group is developing a camera that can take photos through glass without any reflections. For their latest project they used the Xbox One's Kinect motion sensor and camera, taking advantage of its depth sensor.

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New research suggests Saturn’s rings & moons may be younger than dinosaurs

New research suggests Saturn’s rings & moons may be younger than dinosaurs

The most iconic feature of the planet Saturn — it's wide set of rings — along with its many icy moons may actually be much younger than previously thought. A new study published by the SETI Institute says that Saturn's rings and inner moons may be no more than 100 million years old, meaning they likely formed when dinosaurs roamed the Earth. That would make them about 4 billion years younger than the planet Saturn itself.

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Yellowstone hotspot had 12 ancient ‘super-eruptions’

Yellowstone hotspot had 12 ancient ‘super-eruptions’

Some really big eruptions happened during Yellowstone’s past, but they all may pale in comparison to a bunch of so-called “super eruptions” that took place in Idaho millions of years ago. According to researchers, these exceptionally massive eruptions happened between 8 and 12 million years ago, and were much, much larger than previously believed, eclipsing a bunch of ancient eruptions that happened in the same general region.

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Strange newly discovered cavefish can walk up cave walls

Strange newly discovered cavefish can walk up cave walls

It’s not everyday you see a fish that can walk, but just such a discovery was made by researchers with the New Jersey Institute of Technology. The cavefish was found in Thailand and features an unusual anatomy giving it the ability to climb its way up waterfalls -- something researchers believe could help shed light on evolutionary changes that happened many millions of years ago. No other (living) fish have been discovered with this ability.

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NASA says moon spin axis shifted by 5-degrees 3 billion years ago

NASA says moon spin axis shifted by 5-degrees 3 billion years ago

NASA has discovered evidence via research that it funded that indicates eons ago the surface of the moon might have looked different from Earth. According to the research the spin axis of the moon shifted by about 5-degrees around 3 billion years ago. Evidence of this movement was found in how ancient lunar ice is distributed seen as evidence of water delivered to the early solar system.

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NASA Ceres low-orbit pics show salt, mountains, shiny craters

NASA Ceres low-orbit pics show salt, mountains, shiny craters

Yesterday, NASA researchers unveiled a bunch of images revealing a close-up look at Ceres, the dwarf planet. These images were captured by the Dawn spacecraft when it was at its lowest orbit, and they include some detailed views of the Occator Crater, as well as the shiny surfaces causing those mysterious bright spots. A color-enhanced map of Ceres has been released, as well as a video explaining different features on the landscape.

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Homes of the future could be powered by old, ugly tomatoes

Homes of the future could be powered by old, ugly tomatoes

Tomatoes: they’re acidic, tasty, and sometimes ugly. The especially ugly tomatoes usually don’t make it to market, at least not in ordinary supermarkets, nor do the ones that were damaged or started to go bad during harvest. This translates into a lot of tomato waste, something our increasingly resource-conscious world finds unfortunate. Enter the American Chemical Society and a new project it has detailed: turning waste tomatoes into biofuel cells.

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