Science

ESO’s ALMA detects gas clouds that helped form first galaxies

ESO’s ALMA detects gas clouds that helped form first galaxies

The European Southern Observatory’s Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, more commonly referred to as ALMA, has detected the most distant gas clouds that form stars thus far discovered in the early universe. That makes this a particularly notable observation, and will allow researchers to further understand how the very first galaxies were formed and how they cleared away hydrogen gas fog during a period known as “reionization”. Until this point, such observations were described as being simply "faint blobs".

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Pluto: second icy mountain range revealed in new image

Pluto: second icy mountain range revealed in new image

Last week, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft gave us some up-close, detailed images of Pluto's landscape and geology, including a look at an icy mountain range. Now, only a few days later, NASA has released another image that reveals a second mountain range, with peaks between half a mile and one mile in height. The range is located near the southwestern part of Pluto's now famous heart-shaped spot, about 68 miles from Norgay Montes, the first mountain range that was photographed.

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New Horizons snaps Pluto’s moons Nix and Hydra

New Horizons snaps Pluto’s moons Nix and Hydra

The NASA New Horizons spacecraft has made history by sending us back images of Pluto and its moons that are the highest resolution humans have ever laid eyes on. While the images of Pluto itself were sharp and clear allowing us to see the surface of the dwarf planet in detail, the images of its moons are not so clear. The shot here is an image of Pluto's moon Nix on the left and Hydra on the right.

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Fossil fuels may cripple carbon dating accuracy

Fossil fuels may cripple carbon dating accuracy

Carbon dating may suffer drastically if pollution levels continue to rise, and the reason revolves around fossil fuel emissions. According to a recent study by Imperial College London atmospheric scientist Heather Graven, emissions could drastically “age” the atmosphere over the coming decades and make accurate carbon dating more difficult. It has been known that such emissions have a "dilution" effect, but this recent study shows how drastically.

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Rhinos outfitted with horn cameras, GPS to fight poaching

Rhinos outfitted with horn cameras, GPS to fight poaching

British nonprofit animal conservation group Protect has come up with a new way to fight poachers, and it involves outfitting rhinos with their own versions of tech wearables. The system relies on three pieces of technology to track and monitor the animals: heart rate monitors under the skin, a GPS transmitter around the neck, and a camera embedded in the horn after a hole is (painlessly) drilled. The technology is called Real-time Anti-Poaching Intelligence Device (RAPID), and is already being tested on threatened rhino populations in South Africa.

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2015 isn’t over yet, but it’s already breaking heat records

2015 isn’t over yet, but it’s already breaking heat records

Last year was, at the start of 2015, the hottest year on record. We're only half way through this year, however, and it is already breaking heat records. If it keeps this up, 2015 will overtake 2014 as the hottest year on record, a song we're likely to hear more often as climate change continues to worsen. The information comes from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), NASA, and the Japan Meteorological Agency, among others. All of them have pointed toward June having been record-smashing hot.

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Elon Musk explains first SpaceX failure in 7 years

Elon Musk explains first SpaceX failure in 7 years

Today SpaceX CEO and founder Elon Musk spoke about the Falcon 9 CRS-7 launch failure that occurred earlier this year. This event occurred on June 28th of 2015 en-route to the International Space Station. At liftoff this flight was nominal, with no signs of possible malfunction apparent. Shortly before first stage shutdown, the flight failed. Today Musk addressed the issues that they believe may have been the cause of this failed mission. There is still no one 100% certain found cause for this mishap.

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Stephen Hawking, Yuri Milner unveil mission to find aliens

Stephen Hawking, Yuri Milner unveil mission to find aliens

We’ve been hunting for signs of life elsewhere in the universe for quite a while, but as far as most of us know there has been no discovery of intelligent life beyond our own planet. That could, if we’re fortunate enough, end some time in the next decade thanks to a new 10-year mission with a $100 million backing. The search will be broken down into two initiatives, with the first having been announced today by Stephen Hawking and other participating researchers.

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Smithsonian wants to digitize Neil Armstrong’s space suit

Smithsonian wants to digitize Neil Armstrong’s space suit

Astronaut Neil Armstrong's historically significant space suit is the latest subject of restoration at the Smithsonian. The crew hopes to not only fully restore the suit itself, but to digitize its image. With the latest technology in imaging and 3D scanning, the Smithsonian hopes to turn the suit into a digital piece of material. With the media created, the suit will be able to be looked at and explored in classrooms and museums around the world - not to mention the virtual reality space for all people everywhere.

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NASA releases hypnotizing new image of Earth

NASA releases hypnotizing new image of Earth

While much of the buzz from NASA recently has been about the New Horizons' trip to Pluto, the agency hasn't totally forgotten about the blue orb we inhabit. Captured from a camera on the Deep Space Climate Observatory, NASA has just released the satellite's first view of the sunlit side of Earth from 1 million miles away, and it sure is stunning. The image shows North and Central America, with the Caribbean islands located in the turquoise areas in the center.

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You’ll soon be able to eat gluten again courtesy of egg yolks

You’ll soon be able to eat gluten again courtesy of egg yolks

Those with celiac disease are unable to eat foods containing gluten, and as a result have very limited diets. Others say they are intolerant to gluten, unable to eat it without discomfort, and so too elect to remove it from their diet. Thanks to the studious work of some Canadian researchers, however, those dietary limitations may be a thing of the past. Researchers at the University of Alberta have used egg yolks to develop a new supplement that blocks the absorption of the component from gluten that causes celiacs their troubles.

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Researchers use bone powder, bio-glue to 3D print bones

Researchers use bone powder, bio-glue to 3D print bones

This Friday's dose of macabre comes courtesy of researchers in China who are testing a new method to 3D print bones. The bones aren't like past 3D printing attempts we've heard of, however -- they are being printed using powered bones and a biological glue. Past efforts have seen researchers using metal elements for printing 3D bones as potential medical implants, but this latest method is producing potentially implantable bones that made entirely of, you know, bones ground into a powder.

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