Science

Ancient tombs may have served as telescopes for rituals

Ancient tombs may have served as telescopes for rituals

Ancient stone tombs in Portugal may have served as a sort of telescope to enhance one’s ability to see stars for ritualistic purposes. The tombs are 6,000 years old and made of stone, and they feature a peculiarly lengthy but low-height entrance. As well, researchers believe they may have found the particular star these ‘telescopes’ were aimed at: Aldebaran, a bright red star located in the Taurus constellation.

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DJI and Measure team up to tackle commercial drone space

DJI and Measure team up to tackle commercial drone space

Drones are becoming more commonplace in everyday life, but aside from private and military application of drones, commercial enterprises are also increasing their use of the technology. Recognizing that this is the perfect opportunity to corner a growing market, drone maker DJI and Measure, which is pegged as the nation's leading operator of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have announced a new partnership, with their sights set directly on the commercial drone space.

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LG reveals textile pressure sensors that bend and fold

LG reveals textile pressure sensors that bend and fold

While its rival is still obsessing over bendable and foldable mobile devices, LG is working on something somewhat more traditional but still groundbreaking. Its Innotek "cutting edge materials" manufacturing arm has unveiled a new type of textile that can sense pressure across its whole surface. And since its textile, it can be bended and folded in any which way, making it a suitable material for clothing and accessories for use in medical, health, and even automotive industries.

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Ancient pay stub reveals worker was paid with beer

Ancient pay stub reveals worker was paid with beer

A 5,000-year-old clay tablet is the oldest known pay stub in the world, and it has revealed an interesting relationship between one ancient worker and his boss: the worker was paid with beer. The pay stub was discovered in what is now modern day Iraq, and it is written in cuneiform, appearing to be a gibberish of lines and chicken scratch to most of us. A trained eye, though, will see a person with his head leaned toward a bowl and another container with a shape that indicates beer, as well as marks that show how much beer the worker got for his labor.

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Flames and fanfare as NASA’s Mars mission rocket aces testing

Flames and fanfare as NASA’s Mars mission rocket aces testing

As ways to disturb the peace and quiet of the desert go, firing up the most powerful rocket in the world has to be near the top of the list. That was the fun & games had by NASA and Orbital ATK today, testing out the new Space Launch System (SLS) booster that will one day take first uncrewed probes and then astronauts to Mars.

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Dinosaur-age bird wing discovered in amber jewelry market

Dinosaur-age bird wing discovered in amber jewelry market

Bird skin, claws, muscle, and feathers have been discovered in amber dated to nearly a hundred million years ago. Researchers suggest that these bits and pieces of birds show how coloring and arrangement of bird feathers has remained largely the same for a very, very long time. Wing tips is what they have. A very strange (but apparently not entirely uncommon) origin story is what they've got to tell.

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Methylene Blue could help improve memory, new study suggests

Methylene Blue could help improve memory, new study suggests

Methylene Blue is a drug you've possibly never heard of before, but it's been in use for nearly a century. These days, the drug is primarily used to treat methemoglobinemia, a disease that affects the ability of soft tissue to absorb oxygen from the bloodstream, but a new study suggests it may have some exciting uses for improving memory and attention.

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Why this vast helium discovery is being called “life-saving”

Why this vast helium discovery is being called “life-saving”

You might associate helium with party balloons and squeaky voices, but the gas is a whole lot more important: that's why scientists have been so worried in recent years of a helium shortage. Vital for everything from MRI scanners through to essential nuclear energy production systems, helium's usefulness has traditionally stood at odds with its relative rarity.

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Ancient, disguised insects discovered in amber fossils

Ancient, disguised insects discovered in amber fossils

We may not be pulling dinosaur DNA from insects fossilized in amber any time soon, but fossilized insects can still give us a window into the past: a team of researchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences have documented 39 examples of ancient insects disguising themselves with various items, from general debris to the exoskeletons of dispatched foes. The team, which was led by Bo Wang, had to search through more than 300,000 fossils to find these specimens, which hail from the mid-Cretaceous period.

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As crunch day nears, NASA’s Juno beams home stunning Jupiter photo

As crunch day nears, NASA’s Juno beams home stunning Jupiter photo

NASA's Juno mission to Jupiter may still be a week out from the distant planet, but it's already sending back unique images of the gas giant. The probe isn't expected to reach Jupiter until July 4th, but has been beaming back early photography as it makes its final approach, including hitherto-unseen angles of not only the planet but its four largest moons, too.

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Anki’s Cozmo introduced as a consumer-level robot with personality

Anki’s Cozmo introduced as a consumer-level robot with personality

Artificial intelligence and robotics are two things that permeate modern-day life, whether it's the Curiosity rover scouring the surface of Mars or Watson dominating at a game of Jeopardy. For the most part, however, these robotic applications have been left to the professional spaces, be it the military, manufacturing, or science in general. But what about consumer applications? Overdrive developer Anki is asking that very question today with the introduction of its new, consumer-focused robot that goes by the name of Cozmo.

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NASA’s Curiosity rover will attempt to collect water sample on Mars

NASA’s Curiosity rover will attempt to collect water sample on Mars

Over the last year, NASA has discovered numerous evidence that liquid water exists on Mars. With signs the red planet once had lakes, and frozen water found on mountains, NASA now wants to try collecting a sample, and plans to use the Curiosity rover to do it. The robot is already located near Mars's Gale Crater, and it will travel to inspect a pair of gullies on the side of Mount Sharp.

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