Science

Researchers: Antarctic ice shelves melting spiked in the last decade

Researchers: Antarctic ice shelves melting spiked in the last decade

Some researchers have undertaken a big effort to monitor the rate of Antarctic ice selves melting, and what they've found again shows that the ice is melting faster than ever before, particularly in the last decade when a spike in the rate was observed. Such information comes from a recent study detailing work done by a research team headed by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. According to the newly published study, the rate of ice shelf melting in some areas has increased by 18-percent over the past nearly 20 years, and there's no signs of that slowing down.

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One-year NASA mission launch: watch LIVE as Soyuz takes off

One-year NASA mission launch: watch LIVE as Soyuz takes off

Starting today, NASA's Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Mikhail Kornienko will be heading off for a year in space aboard the International Space Station. While Padalka's mission will be slightly shorter at a standard six months, a full year in space is planned for Kelly and Kornienko. This mission will test the long-term spaceflight effects on the human body in both physiological and psychological terms. Scott Kelly is also part of a twin study - his (retired) brother Mark Kelly will be remaining on Earth to be studied by NASA as the mission takes place in space.

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The hunt for dark matter: NASA’s Hubble, Chandra uncover new clues

The hunt for dark matter: NASA’s Hubble, Chandra uncover new clues

Astronomers have uncovered new clues about the nature of mysterious dark matter using NASA's Hubble telescope and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The newest discovery is that dark matter doesn't decelerate when it collides against other dark matter. Previous theories held dark matter to be more interactive. If this new information is correct, it could eliminate some previous theories about the behavior of dark matter. For example: because dark matter doesn't slow down when it collides with itself, theories relying on strong friction are out the window.

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Researchers create new form of ice using graphene sheets

Researchers create new form of ice using graphene sheets

Researchers have managed to create a new type of ice, something that results from using a couple sheets of graphene to flatten a drop of water. This is done on the microscopic level, and the new type of ice is called "square ice", referring to the square grid-like pattern of the atoms. The ice is created at room temperature, which makes it all the more notable, and follows an initial discovery made back in 2012 when a team of researchers noted that water vapor will pass through graphene oxide, but not helium gas or related gases.

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Students create bass-blasting extinguisher to put out fires

Students create bass-blasting extinguisher to put out fires

A pair of students have developed a modern version of the trusty and ever-handy fire extinguisher, and it's a rendition that is sure to titillate dubstep lovers far and wide: it uses a blast of bass to put out the flames. The extinguisher was made by engineering students Seth Robertson and Viet Tran, who funded the creation themselves and used it as a class project for a senior-level class. The result is a 20lb hand-held device that puts out flames without making a mess, and that has the potential to aid in putting out big fires.

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CERN’s LHC is delayed by repairs before its 2nd run

CERN’s LHC is delayed by repairs before its 2nd run

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is preparing for its second run in Switzerland, but it has it some snags along the way. This second round of collisions will use particle beams operating at 6.5 TeV, which is much higher energy than the collider's first run. Although seven out of eight machine sectors are considered ready to go, one sector has encountered a problem which will need to be repaired before any further preparation for the collider's next run. The necessary corrections could delay the LHC's second run by a few weeks.

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Researchers find shape-shifting frogs in the Andes

Researchers find shape-shifting frogs in the Andes

Researchers have discovered shape-shifting frogs in the Ecuadorian Andes, it has been announced. The frogs are able to change the look of their skin within the span of a few minutes to imitate a surface they are sitting upon, making them what is thought to be the first amphibian discovered with such an ability. The species is called Pristimantis mutabilis, which means "mutable rainfrog", and its shape-shifting revolves around the texture of its skin, which can go from mostly smooth to "high tubercular".

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Behold, the 50-year-old Corned Beef Sandwich in Space

Behold, the 50-year-old Corned Beef Sandwich in Space

What an odd thing to memorialize - but there it is. The 50th anniversary of the first (and last) corned-beef sandwich to fly through space. Back on the 23rd of March, 1964, NASA launched their first two-man space mission Gemini 3. Two hours into the flight, astronaut John Young pulled a corned beef sandwich out of his space suit pocket. It was a joke, or a "gotcha" as his partner called them - but a joke that turned deadly serious not long after his epic sandwich-heavy space-prank was revealed.

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Russian space tourist flights to ISS to resume

Russian space tourist flights to ISS to resume

For a long time the only way for normal people to get into space was to pay the Russians big bucks for a seat in the Soyuz capsule on its way to the ISS. The Russians allowed eight people to catch a ride to the ISS between 2001 and 2009. Private passengers weren't able to go to the ISS with the Russian state space agency after NASA and other space agencies needed to use the seat to get their own astronauts to the ISS.

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Real Jurassic Park? Woolly mammoth genes spliced into elephant DNA

Real Jurassic Park? Woolly mammoth genes spliced into elephant DNA

Harvard scientists are using a process called "de-extinction" to bring species that were once extinct back from the dead, starting with the woolly mammoth. The Harvard University research team, led by George Church, has taken woolly mammoth genes retrieved from actual frozen remains and spliced them into the genes of an Asian elephant. Church isn't the first to attempt to bring the woolly mammoth species back to life, but he may be the first to get the mammoth genes to function tangibly in over 5,000 years.

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