safety

Former TSA agent admits “we knew full-body scanners didn’t work”

Former TSA agent admits “we knew full-body scanners didn’t work”

"We knew the full-body scanners didn't work before they were even installed," is the claim from former TSA agent Jason Harrington, alleging that not only were airport security staff aware that the X-ray scans were flawed, but that the instructors guiding them on them admitted it too. The flaws in each of the $150,000 Rapiscan Systems scanners - which the TSA switched from in early 2013 - were well known and lied about, Harrington writes at Politico, who also details the ways he and his former colleagues would look at what amounted to nude images of travelers.

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Google’s Glass frames are pretty but dumb

Google’s Glass frames are pretty but dumb

Google has finally revealed its frame options for Glass, the Titanium Collection, with four styles and the chance to have prescription lenses fitted. It addresses a long-standing complain about the wearable computer, and something Google knew it had to fix before the consumer launch before the end of 2014. Problem is, as a Glass Explorer and someone who wears prescription glasses to correct my vision, it feels like Google hasn't thought through exactly how the frames will work in everyday use.

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Vital infrastructure a cyber-terrorism timebomb EU warns

Vital infrastructure a cyber-terrorism timebomb EU warns

Vital control systems used by energy, water, and transportation are ill-prepared to cope with online terrorism and hacking threats, the EU's cyber security agency has warned, blaming patchy and inconsistent testing for what could be a potential infrastructure disaster. Industrial Control Systems (ICS) are "often outdated" ENISA points out, while their expected lifespan of 20 years or more fails to incorporate the sort of security features essential to withstand cyber-terrorism attacks.

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Is Google Glass for drivers really safe?

Is Google Glass for drivers really safe?

Road safety while using wearable tech like Google Glass is back in the headlines, with the acquittal of one early-adopter of distracted driving charges prompting controversy over what's acceptable to use while you're behind the wheel, and what's in fact dangerous. The ruling on Thursday that Glass wearer Cecilia Abadie would not be fined for sporting the headset after being pulled over for speeding has been heralded by some "Explorers" as validation that the technology is road-worthy. Nonetheless, the question remains, is Glass really safe - not to mention legal - for drivers to use while on the road?

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NHTSA reaffirms Tesla Model S safety rating for good measure

NHTSA reaffirms Tesla Model S safety rating for good measure

Suggesting that despite the sizable presence of the Tesla Model S in the news as of late for auto accidents, the NHTSA has gone out of their way to reaffirm their “highest safety rating in America” for the vehicle. Letting it be known that the Tesla Model S still has a 5-start safety rating, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration effectively told the world to cool their heels this holiday season. They say the Tesla S is just as safe as the first time they tested it.

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Tesla says its product didn’t cause garage blaze while fire department is less certain

Tesla says its product didn’t cause garage blaze while fire department is less certain

Tesla's long run of good luck came to an end earlier this year when one of its Model S cars caught on fire near Seattle, something that was the result of hitting debris in the road. This incident was followed up with some other incidents, not the least of which was a garage in California that contained a Model S catching on fire last month. Tesla Motors says the fire wasn't a result of its vehicle, but a report by the fire authority acquired by Reuters indicates less certainty.

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Airplane phone calls still facing ban as DOT chief voices concerns

Airplane phone calls still facing ban as DOT chief voices concerns

The chance of being able to make voice calls on planes is looking increasingly slim, with the Department of Transportation chief weighing in with his own concerns that in-air chatterboxes may not be in anybody's best interest. The DOT's stance is an important one, following an FCC vote discarding a technical ban on voice calls recently; the Department's role, Secretary Anthony Foxx said in a statement, is not only based on technical issues, however, but whether "allowing these calls is fair to consumers."

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