research

Researchers make rechargeable energy-storing paper

Researchers make rechargeable energy-storing paper

Researchers at Linkoping University have created a new type of paper they call “power paper” that is able to store energy. In addition to storing energy, this paper — which is made from nano cellulose and a conductive polymer — can also be recharged. Power paper, despite its abilities, is made from polymer said to be “easily available”, and the cellulose itself is renewable. This could lead to more sustainable, environmentally friendly ways of storing energy that are safer than existing battery technology.

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Laser-Induced graphene supercapacitors may be the future of wearables

Laser-Induced graphene supercapacitors may be the future of wearables

Last year researchers at Rice University announced that they had been able to develop a way to produce graphene usiang a computer-controlled laser in the process. The resulting product was dubbed laser-induced graphene (LIG). Since developing the material, the researchers are now proposing that it might be a suitable replacement for batteries inside wearable electronic devices.

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Bio-ink used to print ‘living’ blood vessels

Bio-ink used to print ‘living’ blood vessels

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have 3D printed living blood vessels using a “bio-ink” — that is, a mash of materials that the human body finds agreeable. Using this ink, principal investigator Monica Moya and team have printed blood vessels that lead to further growth of capillaries. Said Moya, "This technology can take biology from the traditional petri dish to a 3D physiologically relevant tissue patch with functional vasculature."

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Spotted, a Dark Matter creche and its monstrous baby galaxies

Spotted, a Dark Matter creche and its monstrous baby galaxies

A creche of monstrous baby galaxies, swaddled in dark matter and billions of light years from Earth, could help answer questions about how the known universe formed. Monstrous galaxies, rapid stellar incubators, are no longer a feature of the universe, though ten billion years ago they pumped out new stars up to thousands of times the rate of current production.

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Washington D.C.’s sewage is generating 10MW of electricity

Washington D.C.’s sewage is generating 10MW of electricity

It’s more conventional than drinking water harvested from human waste, but no less interesting: generating electricity from raw sewage. Researchers have given the subject ample attention over the years and especially lately, with the technology promising a future where waste is put to good use and its effect on the environment is lessened. Washington D.C. is one such place testing the technology.

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Gene-editing must wait until safety and ethics catch up

Gene-editing must wait until safety and ethics catch up

Gene-editing on human reproductive cells on a large scale may be possible, but the ethical and safety issues still outweigh the urgency to put it into practice. That's the decision of members of the Organizing Committee for the International Summit on Human Gene Editing who, after three days debating the potential for genetically tinkering with embryo, sperm, or egg cells from human donors, concluded it would be "irresponsible" to go ahead now.

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Hawaii’s Supreme Court revokes telescope construction permit

Hawaii’s Supreme Court revokes telescope construction permit

One of the world’s tallest telescopes was planned for construction in the Mauna Kea conservation district; a permit to build the telescope, called simply “Thirty Meter Telescope”, was issued in 2013 by the state Board of Land and Natural Resources. This quickly lead to protests from those who want the project halted, the reasons for which vary from Mauna Kea’s sacred status to cultural preservation.

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Newly developed sponge material sucks up oil spills

Newly developed sponge material sucks up oil spills

Oil spill catastrophes like the Gulf Coast BP disaster in 2010 are difficult to clean up, with current methods being expensive and inefficient, not to mention time consuming. Researchers from Deakin University and several other institutions may have the solution, however, and it comes in the form of a new material. Called boron nitride nanosheet, this material is described as functioning like a sponge, absorbing oil directly out of the water.

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Global bicycle ownership rates see big downturn

Global bicycle ownership rates see big downturn

According to new research, the number of households that own a bicycle is decreasing drastically across the globe, with 148 countries showing an average decline of 50% over a few decades. This comes at a time when climate change concerns and sustainability efforts are at an all time high; cycling is one of the most sustainable forms of transportation, but one that many people far and wide are turning away from. A total of 1.25 billion households were looked at over the course of the study, and ownership was split into four groups.

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Fast Radio Burst from space found rich with data

Fast Radio Burst from space found rich with data

While astronomers have known about Fast Radio Bursts for a while now, never before have they been able to be utilized as they are here in the year 2015. A study has been published which not only shows where one unique fast radio burst likely originates from, but what sorts of elements in encountered on its way to our sensors, billions of light-years away from its source. Behold, FRB 110523, the object of this galactic study. The data it brings tells tales of its travels.

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Your brain is a ‘unique mosaic’ of male and female structures

Your brain is a ‘unique mosaic’ of male and female structures

Society says — nay, insists! — that male and female brains are wired differently. Whether you like this or dislike that is because of your brain’s gender wiring, according to popular opinion. Your passions and preferences and tendencies and personality? The result of your gender-specific brain, many insist. That's not true, though, at least according to a new research project that found brains are highly variable with “a unique mosaic of features” common to both genders.

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