research

Large Hadron Collider experiment finds new class of particles

Large Hadron Collider experiment finds new class of particles

The Large Hadron Collider team has announced the discovery of a new class of particles called pentaquark. A paper detailing the discovery has been submitted to the journal of Physical Review Letters. The finding was made during an LHCb experiment, and follows past experiments where evidence of pentaquarks were inconclusive. This time around, says CERN, the latest experiment was successful because it essentially searched “with the lights on, and from all angles" rather than "in the dark" like past efforts.

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We’ve passed Pluto – where are the photos?

We’ve passed Pluto – where are the photos?

Now that we've passed Pluto, you might be wondering why we're not looking at brand new up-close photos of all sorts. NASA's New Horizons spacecraft has an antenna that must remain stationary at all times - it's not attached to a robotic arm or anything. Because of this, and because the craft was only passing extremely close to Pluto for a short period of time, the team wisely decided to utilize the time collecting data from our spacey cousin rather than sending back data as fast as they could. In short - photos and data are coming inside this week, just not right this minute.

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Oxitec’s GM mosquitoes annihilate their wild counterparts

Oxitec’s GM mosquitoes annihilate their wild counterparts

Mosquitoes are a nuisance for some and a deadly reality for others. The pests are responsible for transmitting diseases to million of people every year, and efforts to quash this problem have been only somewhat successful. Enter Oxitec's genetically modified mosquitoes -- they are designed to produce offspring that do not reach an age sufficient enough for reproduction, and when sufficiently large enough populations of them are introduced into the wild they result in an utter annihilation of their non-modified neighbors.

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Ultrasound stimulates, speeds up wound healing

Ultrasound stimulates, speeds up wound healing

Cut yourself and, assuming you're somewhat young and otherwise healthy, it'll heal in a reasonable amount of time. Older age and certain conditions like diabetes can interfere with this healing process, though, and could result in wounds that won't heal or that take a very long time to heal. Researchers at the University of Bristol and the University of Sheffield may have a solution, however, in the form of low-intensity ultrasounds. A study detailing their effort reveals their technique both speeds up healing time and restores to the body a youthful/healthy healing ability.

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Pluto approaching: New Horizons’ scientist answers 4 questions

Pluto approaching: New Horizons’ scientist answers 4 questions

New Horizons' Ralph Instrument Scientist Dennis Reuter speaks up today about th eminent approach of the mission to Pluto. Also speaking on his position with the Goddard Space observatory, Reuter tapped into Pluto and the exploration of the Kuiper Belt - our solar system's "last frontier." Reuter spoke up about the data collection this mission will execute, seeking out information on Pluto's chemical and atmospheric makeup using the Ralph spectrometer. This mission's apex will be reached tomorrow at 11:50 UTC - that's 4:50 AM Pacific Time, 7:50 AM Eastern Time.

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Audi puts self-driving car on diet to persuade politicians

Audi puts self-driving car on diet to persuade politicians

Audi has revamped its self-driving car, trimming the fat on the autonomous RS 7 racer as it continues to court politicians in the US. The newest model, dubbed Robby and decked out in a striking red and black color scheme, keeps the autonomous hardware - which Audi refers to as "piloted driving" - of its predecessors, but goes on a serious diet to improve performance. In fact, the company says, it has trimmed 882 pounds from the self-driving prototype.

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NASA study shows extra heat from greenhouse gases trapped in ocean

NASA study shows extra heat from greenhouse gases trapped in ocean

NASA researchers have been studying the temperature of the oceans around the world in recent years and have found that extra heat from greenhouse gasses has been trapped in the waters of the Pacific and Indian oceans. According to the researchers on the project, this trapping of heat in the ocean water accounts for the slowdown in global surface temperatures observed over the last decade.

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Niobium nanowires may give wearable electronics a power boost

Niobium nanowires may give wearable electronics a power boost

One of the major limiting factors for wearable electronics today is the size of the battery that can be placed inside. Since wearable devices have to be small and light enough to be worn comfortably there isn't much room inside for a battery. Researchers at MIT have developed a new approach to powering wearable electronics that promises to deliver short but intense bursts of power that wearable devices need to operate.

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NASA names commercial crew for SpaceX and Boeing

NASA names commercial crew for SpaceX and Boeing

NASA has picked four veteran astronauts to be the first crew of a commercial spaceflight, as America turns to SpaceX and Boeing to cut its dependence on Russia. Robert Behnken, Eric Boe, Douglas Hurley, and Sunita Williams will now begin trining with the two companies developing private spacecraft, ahead of missions first to the International Space Station but, eventually, manned trips to Mars which are expected to take place sometime in the 2030s.

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The big deal about IBM’s tiny chips

The big deal about IBM’s tiny chips

IBM is making a big deal of celebrating a tiny achievement, successfully producing a 7nm chip that could mean huge efficiency improvements in phones, laptops and more. Squeezing more than 20 billion transistors into a chip the size of a fingernail took figuring out new manufacturing processes and chewed through part of a $3bn investment IBM earmarked back in 2014, but it's shaping up to be worth every cent. Big Blue predicts a power/performance increase of more than 50-percent from the smaller processors.

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New Horizon’s weirdest cargo will warm your heart

New Horizon’s weirdest cargo will warm your heart

Aboard the New Horizons craft as it edges closer to Pluto than we've ever been before is carried the ashes of its discoverer. Astronomer Clyde Tombaugh was the man that discovered our celestial neighbor Pluto. Now - thanks to some thoughtful NASA engineers - Tombaugh's mortal remains will be the closest that have ever traveled to our most distant Solar System cousin. This week NASA spoke with Tombaugh's children. "My Dad always said if he ever had the chance," said Tombaugh's son "he’d love to visit the planets in the solar system and around other stars." Now he will.

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3D printed robot built like a squid, hops like a rocket

3D printed robot built like a squid, hops like a rocket

A squishy, explosively-bouncing robot might herald the next age of 'bot design and could almost be a robo-squid, if only it had a beak. 3D printed robots aren't new, but this is the first time graduated layers of hardness have been used, allowing the explosion-powered blob created by engineers led by Nicholas Bartlett at Harvard University to not only adjust the direction it bounces off in, but to deform in a controlled way on landing that balances preserving the electronics while landing elegantly.

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