research

Google pairs with scientists to make genetic analysis cloud service

Google pairs with scientists to make genetic analysis cloud service

Human DNA may be small, but it packs a lot of information--so much, that it can take time for genetic researchers to pore over data in hopes of making the connections that could one day find cures to diseases like diabetes and cancer. Google Cloud Platform puts the same technologies that are behind Google Search and Google Maps into genetic data organization with its Google Genomics project. The project's newest partner is the Broad Institute which is a genetic research center that specializes in biomedical discoveries and maintains partnerships with renown research groups such as Harvard and MIT.

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Spike-back worm Hallucigenia’s head found after 38 years

Spike-back worm Hallucigenia’s head found after 38 years

The creature you're about to see lived on Earth about 508 million years ago, and today we get to see its head for the first time. We get to see its head in the right place for the first time, to be more precise. Before now, scientists had this lovely little beast upside-down and backwards. Not entirely unheard of when dealing with creatures that aren't as simple to identify as birds or mammals of many types, this creature was displayed wrong. Now, 38 years after its discovery here in modern times, "Hallucigenia" can stand upright.

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Carniverous New Guinea flatworm invades United States

Carniverous New Guinea flatworm invades United States

Slimy slug-eating New Guinea flatworm appears in Florida in good position to prepare invasion of the rest of the United States. This is the first time on record this creature has been spotted inside the United States in the wild, and it's certainly not welcome. At just around 2-inches long at full length, the New Guinea isn't just nasty to behold, it's a menace to food chains it invades. Below you're going to see this worm. If you see this worm in real life, report it immediately.

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Researchers create creepy, hyperrealistic CGI skin

Researchers create creepy, hyperrealistic CGI skin

A newly developed CGI rendering technique is about to take CGI renditions of human skin to an "uncanny valley" level of creepy. Until now, rendering only created "mesoscale" details such as pores and wrinkles. This new CGI method captures details on a "microscale" which includes the texture within pores and extremely fine lines. Normally, skin microstructures that are under one-tenth of a millimeter are not reconstructed in CGI, even though they have a large impact in the way we perceive facial expressions.

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ESA decides between Thor, Ariel, and Xipe for next medium mission

ESA decides between Thor, Ariel, and Xipe for next medium mission

It's a battle of the space-gods as the ESA's Concurrent Design Facility (CDF) study at ESTEC decides between Xipe, Ariel, and Thor. Each of these names corresponds with a craft, and each craft corresponds with a proposed area of study. Up for grabs are exoplanets, plasma physics and the X-ray Universe, one each to possibly be studied by the the Atmospheric Remote-Sensing Infrared Exoplanet Large-survey (Ariel), the Turbulence Heating ObserveR (Thor) and the X-ray Imaging Polarimetry Explorer (Xipe). These are the final three missions that'll eventually be cut down to one this upcoming analytical session.

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Rosetta mission extended as Philae wakes from long sleep

Rosetta mission extended as Philae wakes from long sleep

"This is fantastic news for science," said Matt Taylor, ESA's Rosetta Project Scientist, as he speaks on extending the life of their thought-dead research. Rosetta was originally launched in 2004, bringing its lander Philae to the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. It arrived in August of 2014, did some studies of the environment from up high, and deployed its lander Philae on the 12th of November. From there, things went dark. Just about 57 hours after landing and beginning operations, Philae went dark, and things looked dim.

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Facebook doesn’t need your face to recognize you

Facebook doesn’t need your face to recognize you

Facebook has developed the next level of facial recognition software that is so clever, it can identify you even if your face is obscured. If you were paranoid about being auto-tagged in pictures before, Facebook's new recognition capabilities won't do anything to allay those fears. This new algorithm removes any residual layers of privacy a user would have from photographing themselves from the neck down, or covering their face. The AI behind the development seems human-like its ability to identify a friend from the back of their head.

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U.S. Army and Air Force build laser-blasting bomb-disposal vehicle

U.S. Army and Air Force build laser-blasting bomb-disposal vehicle

The latest technology from the U.S. Air Force and Army that could head into the battlefield involves harnessing laser power to destroy fields of landmines from a safe distance. The Air Force-built laser will be incorporated into the Army's mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicles (MRAPs). The specific prototype is known as RADBO which stands for Recovery of Airbase Denied by Ordinance. It's a lengthy moniker, but it accurately describes the missions in which the laser should be used--turning an airfield that is littered with landmines into a usable airbase with as few casualties as possible.

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Neanderthals may be more related to us than we realize

Neanderthals may be more related to us than we realize

Today a study headed by Svante Pääbo has been published with information about a new Neanderthal ancestor connection. An early "modern human" was found in Peştera cu Oase, Romania. This Oase individual's genome was sequenced and found to be between 6 and 9% derived from neanderthals. This is a higher percentage neanderthal than any other modern human sequenced thus far. In our entire history of studying modern humans, we've never seen one with so much neanderthal inside. While this doesn't mean we're necessarily a whole lot more neanderthal than we thought, it changes our perception on when neanderthals died out entirely.

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Visualizing where NASA’s Pluto and Ceres craft are right now in space

Visualizing where NASA’s Pluto and Ceres craft are right now in space

Today we watch NASA approach Pluto and Ceres, unfurling space mysteries aplenty. New images are appearing today of both the largest object in the asteroid belt and our furthest sun-circling cousin Pluto appear - but what we want to do is show you where the craft are. What you're about to see is where NASA is as far as space cruisers, first with the NASA Dawn spacecraft, then with the Pluto mission craft New Horizons. They're very, very far away from one another, but they're both just a stone's throw away from their respective goals.

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