research

Climate change “hiatus” a false hope says NOAA

Climate change “hiatus” a false hope says NOAA

No global warming slow-down, no "hiatus": climate change is real and if anything it could be getting faster, US scientists have warned. Challenging claims that Earth temperature levels had plateaued in recent years, the researchers from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Centers for Environmental Information blamed poor quality historic records, along with failures in how different sources of data were balanced, for mistakenly suggesting that the situation had improved.

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Hellboy, the newly-named dinosaur “out of left field”

Hellboy, the newly-named dinosaur “out of left field”

Today the Regaliceratops dinosaur, nicknamed "Hellboy" by its discoverer, is revealed to the scientific community. Described today in the science journal Current Biology, Royal Tyrrell Museum paleontologists Caleb Brown and Donald Henderson tell of a discovery made - almost by accident - on the shores of the Oldman River in Alberta, Canada back in 2005. Regaliceratops is one of a wide array of dinosaurs that - at first glance - might remind you of the very famous dinosaur triceratops. In fact it's similar, but not the same.

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Nano-spirals may bring on unbreakable, unfakeable security scans

Nano-spirals may bring on unbreakable, unfakeable security scans

Students and faculty at Vanderbilt University have fabricated arrays of ultra-tiny spirals that may well be the key to card-based security. This team of researchers created spirals that are around six million times smaller than a dime, recording data about them then with ultrafast lasers at both Vanderbilt and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington. What they discovered was a number of unique properties that would be perfect for digital security measures on physical objects. Identification cards, credit cards, and security cards of all sorts could be improved by these micro-spirals.

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Seven toxic mini-frog species discovered in mountain cloud forests

Seven toxic mini-frog species discovered in mountain cloud forests

Seven new species of extra-tiny frog have been discovered in the Brazilian Atlantic Rainforest and shown in research published this week. The extent of what we know about the miniaturized frog genus Brachycephalus has expanded greatly, suddenly, as this paper shows 5 years of exploration revealing seven new species of the creature. Each of these frogs is very brightly colored, and each has a highly potent neurotoxin in their skin. In other words, though they may look tasty, you should not eat them.

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BMW ConnectedDrive Dynamic Parking Prediction helps you find a parking spot

BMW ConnectedDrive Dynamic Parking Prediction helps you find a parking spot

BMW is working on a unique addition to its connected navigation systems. If you live in a large city or have visited one, you can probably relate to the hassle that is driving around to try to find a spot to park on the street. In crowded and busy cities finding that spot can be a big challenge. BMW has announced an interesting new addition to its ConnectedDrive system called Dynamic Parking Prediction.

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Baidu team banned from AI competition after breaking rules

Baidu team banned from AI competition after breaking rules

Back in May, the Imagenet Large Scale Visual Recognition Challenge (ILSVRC) announced that one of the teams that were participating had circumvented the rules that allow only two evaluations of the test set per week. At the time the people running the challenge didn’t announce which team had broken the rules. That has now changed with the ILSVRC team announcing that the team from Chinese firm Baidu has been banned from the competition.

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Software can detect pain by analyzing a person’s face

Software can detect pain by analyzing a person’s face

A group of researchers at the University of California, San Diego have developed software that can make an accurate guess at what level of pain someone is in just by analyzing their facial expressions. A computer using the algorithm can then act as a somewhat automated version of the pain measurement scale (seen above), which doctors and nurses ask a patient to use when answering the question "how badly does it hurt?" The software certainly won't replace a nurse asking the question, but it could help provide a more accurate answer if the patient is affected by other issues.

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Researchers harness the power of Wi-Fi to charge devices

Researchers harness the power of Wi-Fi to charge devices

A team of researchers from the University of Washington (UW) are working on perfecting a method of charging electronic devices using ambient Wi-Fi signals. They technology, PoWiFi (power over Wi-Fi) makes a small change to routers, so they send out a constant signal that can be harnessed and converted into DC power by a "harvester". The idea isn't new, embodied by Energous's WattUp, but the UW scientists' PoWiFi works with pre-existing hardware, so there is no need to buy a separate device. Their modified routers are able to send data and power over the same signal.

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Hubble telescope spots Pluto’s moons wobbling in ‘chaos’

Hubble telescope spots Pluto’s moons wobbling in ‘chaos’

NASA has released a series of images created based on data from the Hubble Space Telescope, and upon first glance they appear to show dinosaur egg-like oblong objects — those objects are, however, Pluto’s moons Hydra and Nix, and according to the space agency they are “tumbling in absolute chaos”. Such a conclusion was made after analyzing the data from Hubble, which reveals that the two moons wobble about rather than have any set steady course. You can see the "chaos" for yourself in a series of illustrations NASA has released.

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