research

Quick blood test can triage radiation exposure victims, saving lives

Quick blood test can triage radiation exposure victims, saving lives

In the rare, but serious, cases of a radiation leak like the Fukushima nuclear plant's meltdown, first responders are tasked with sending radiation victims to triage based on their level of exposure. A new genetics-based blood test could be a faster, more accurate way to assess how individual victims will respond to radiation. Researchers from Harvard Medical School and New York City's Montefiore Medical Center have created a method of identifying long-term damage from radiation, immediately. Their technique involved looking beyond blood cell counts and delving into blood-bound genes.

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Moonfish found to be first warm-blooded fish

Moonfish found to be first warm-blooded fish

The moonfish, also known as the opah, is the first known warm-blooded fish, it has been announced. This rather voluptuous fish warms its blood using a flapping motion with its pectoral fins, and maintains that heat it generates with "a series of counter-current heat exchangers within its gills". The fish is found in deep sea waters around west Africa and Hawaii, and can grow to be several feet in size. As far as researchers know, this is the first fish of its kind.

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What has an attention span shorter than a goldfish? You, says Microsoft

What has an attention span shorter than a goldfish? You, says Microsoft

Do you ever find yourself starting to read something, but only a paragraph or two into it you have to stop and pop open a new tab, pull out your smartphone for a quick browse, or any other number of distractions? Then it’s right back to whatever you were doing originally, only you’re constantly interrupting yourself with a seemingly endless litany of things, none of which are terribly productive? If that sounds like you, it’s probably because you have an attention span shorter than a goldfish. At least according to Microsoft.

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Bee aware: “unheard of” honey bee death rates in action

Bee aware: “unheard of” honey bee death rates in action

For the first time ever, summer losses of Honey Bee populations in the United States have outweighed the winter. While the Winter Season loss of Honey Bee populations has done down compared to last year, annual losses are up, in the second-largest loss of population in five years and one of the biggest losses in recorded Bee Keeping history. Why does this matter to you? Because approximately 1 out of every 3 mouthfuls of food you digest benefits directly or indirectly from honey bee pollination.

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Hydrographic printing adds detailed paint jobs to 3D-printed objects

Hydrographic printing adds detailed paint jobs to 3D-printed objects

3D printing allows for creating unique and complex objects, but detailed, mechanical painting of such a diverse range of shapes has proven difficult. Water-transfer printing has been used for everything from car dashboards to press-on nails, but the technique falls short when trying to combine "complex shapes" with more detailed paintings. Previously, it was unpredictable how the paid would distort around complex shapes. A new technique for water-transfer printing has been created by a team of researchers from Zheijiang University in China. From knick knacks to 3D-printed leopards and tiger masks, detailed painting of complex objects can now be achieved through water transfers.

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Uncharted shipwreck discovered during MH370 search

Uncharted shipwreck discovered during MH370 search

A previously unknown shipwreck was discovered by searchers during a search for the missing flight MH370. The shipwreck is said to be in the southern Indian Ocean, and it involves a 19th century cargo ship. Which cargo ship isn't known, since it wasn't uncommon for them to sink during the voyage -- whether this one will end up being identified is unknown at this point, but researchers have taken a greater look at the shipwreck since its discovery. Pics after the jump!

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LHC observes Rare Particle Decay: here’s why this is super important

LHC observes Rare Particle Decay: here’s why this is super important

CMS and LHCb collaborations describe the first observation in a lab of the very rare decay B0s particle into two muon particles. Why should this matter to you, you might be asking? Why should this science have any effect on your lifestyle? It really won't - but it will affect the way we continue to unfurl the never-ending scroll of knowledge that is science and physics in our universe. Our very understanding of the nature of the Universe, the start of our existence, and the Standard Model of our universe of particles - all of this is at stake.

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NASA probe take first photo of Pluto’s 5 moons

NASA probe take first photo of Pluto’s 5 moons

Pluto may not have full planet status anymore, but that doesn't mean it doesn't have a moon or two… or five. And for the first time, NASA has managed to capture the dwarf planet and all five of those moons in a single photo. The image was taken by the New Horizons spacecraft and its Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) camera. The spacecraft is scheduled for a flyby of Pluto on July 14th, and took a series of pictures from April 25th through May 1st, resulting in the historic photo.

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New microbattery can independently power microchips

New microbattery can independently power microchips

As electronic devices keep scaling down, batteries need to find a way to maintain performance under smaller size constraints. Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have created an incredibly thin, high-performance, 3D microbattery, which could be the answer to powering individual microchips apart from any separate power source. The research team printed the tiny power source using a technique combining 3D holographic lithography and 2D photo-lithography. The new technique allows for greater control of the electrode's structure; so, the batteries can easily be tailor-made for various applications. The scientists detail the new fabrication technique in their research paper.

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MIT reseachers remove unwanted reflections from photos

MIT reseachers remove unwanted reflections from photos

Taking photographs through a window can be a mess. Anything behind the camera could be reflected, infiltrating the photograph. It can be difficult to see the intended image due to the photographer's own reflection obscuring the image. In the fictional, TV world of CSI, you could just say, "enhance!" But, until now, it hasn't been so easy to erase photographed reflections in the real world. Thankfully, a group of MIT researchers have figured out a complicated algorithm which can remove undesired reflections from photographs.

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