research

Dual Antenna for Broadcast TV is surprisingly small

Dual Antenna for Broadcast TV is surprisingly small

Researchers from the University of Morelos in Mexico have created a new and very small broadcast TV antenna that promises good TV reception in a very small package. The device is called the Reception Box and it is only 11cm L x 6.5cm W x 6mm thick and weighs in at 12 grams. Once the antenna is coated it is only 80g. The designers say that in parts of the US like California, the antenna could pick up the signal of 70 local channels.

Continue Reading

Microsoft Seeing AI is a swiss army knife app for the blind

Microsoft Seeing AI is a swiss army knife app for the blind

We might all marvel at the advancements in computer vision and artificial intelligence, but most of the applications we applaud involve us seeing their results or even their targets. A group of researchers inside Microsoft are working on an implementation of these technologies not just to let computers see but to also let humans see, specifically those that have lost their normal vision. Called Seeing AI, the research project is an attempt to combine years, even decades, of computer vision, machine learning, and artificial intelligence research into an all-in-one app for the visually impaired.

Continue Reading

BEAM inflatable room launches for ISS next week

BEAM inflatable room launches for ISS next week

The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module, also known as BEAM, will be making its way to the International Space Station per next week’s launch. BEAM is an inflatable habitat (a room) designed by Bigelow Aerospace, and it will be attached to the ISS for testing. During its time, astronauts will occupy the habitat for a handful of hours at a time, doing so a few times each year for the next two years. Bigelow’s researchers will gather data from the habitat and learn how it holds up in space.

Continue Reading

Ice age puppies found preserved in Russia’s icy Yakutia

Ice age puppies found preserved in Russia’s icy Yakutia

A pair of puppies dating back to the Ice Age have been recovered from Yakutia, a frigid region in northern Russia. The discovery was first made back in 2011 by hunters seeking mammoth tusks; they saw the snout of one puppy visible through the permafrost and informed Mammoth Museum of the North-Eastern Federal University’s head of exhibitions Sergei Fyodorov. Five years have passed since, and researchers have announced that the puppies are so well preserved, they mark a new world's first.

Continue Reading

New blood test detects concussions days after they happen

New blood test detects concussions days after they happen

Concussions are a serious problem in the world of sports, particularly when it comes to youth sports — concussion symptoms are sometimes delayed in children (less commonly in adults, as well), meaning an evaluation immediately after an incident may not accurately reflect the nature of the injury. Researchers have discovered a way to deal with this, developing a new type of blood test that can identify whether someone has suffered a concussion up to a week after it happened.

Continue Reading

New method identifies coffee cut with cheap, bitter beans

New method identifies coffee cut with cheap, bitter beans

For years, the fabled coffee apocalypse was predicted to come in the form of coffee shortages. As it turns out, though, this particular apocalyptical horse wears a mask and it resembles the real thing — counterfeit coffee, and the growing issue plaguing coffee lovers everywhere. Just like the wood-pulp cheese and fake olive oil, counterfeit coffee resembles the real thing but isn't what consumers think they're buying.

Continue Reading

Sony’s newest team hunts oddball tech for post-PlayStation world

Sony’s newest team hunts oddball tech for post-PlayStation world

Sony is creating a new idea incubator unit, pulling together wearables, unusual home entertainment, and other odd R&D in the hope of figuring out the next big thing. The Sony New Business Incubation Group (NBIG) will hunt down potential "products that span and integrate conceptual consumer technology, human interaction and the environment around them," the company says today.

Continue Reading

NASA wants to solve Hot Jupiter exoplanet mystery

NASA wants to solve Hot Jupiter exoplanet mystery

One of the mysteries of the universe that NASA really wants to solve has to do with a type of exoplanet called a hot Jupiter. These planets are gas giants like Jupiter in our solar system, only they are much hotter thanks to orbiting very close to their parent stars. Scientist assumed for a long time that our solar system was the norm, but with more and more hot Jupiter planets discovered, it turns out our solar system is the odd ball in the universe.

Continue Reading

Researchers find ‘frog foam’ can be used to treat wounds

Researchers find ‘frog foam’ can be used to treat wounds

It sounds a bit icky, but researchers are happy about it. The protein foam produced by Tungara frogs while mating is fully compatible with human cells, it turns out, and could be an excellent way to treat wounds -- particularly burns -- in the future. Such a discovery was made by with the University of Strathclyde, who found that the frog’s foam is “highly stable” and can be used to slow-release antibiotics and other medication.

Continue Reading

Mammoth skull found in Oklahoma sand pit

Mammoth skull found in Oklahoma sand pit

A giant mammoth skull has been unearthed in an Oklahoma sand pit, as well as fragments from a pair of tusks and some teeth. The skull is described as "partial," in that there are some pieces missing. However, images show that it is largely intact and is easily recognizable as a skull. No other skeletal parts are present around the skull, and there are no "cultural associations," according to the Oklahoma Archaeological Survey.

Continue Reading

Researchers show off first ever quantum Fredkin gate

Researchers show off first ever quantum Fredkin gate

Researchers working together from the University of Queensland and Griffith University have demonstrated a key quantum logic operation that is required for quantum computing to move forward. The team demonstrated for the first time a quantum Fredkin gate powered by entanglement that operates on photonic qubits. One of the key challenges to creating a quantum computer has been in the need to minimize the resources needed to implement processing circuits.

Continue Reading

MIT hacked a Xbox Kinect to create a reflection-free camera

MIT hacked a Xbox Kinect to create a reflection-free camera

When taking photos, whether it be of sights or people, sometimes shooting through a window is unavoidable, and that means there's probably going to be glare or reflections. Turns out, researchers at MIT's Media Lab are looking to address this, as their Camera Culture Group is developing a camera that can take photos through glass without any reflections. For their latest project they used the Xbox One's Kinect motion sensor and camera, taking advantage of its depth sensor.

Continue Reading

Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Next