research

Digital pen might one day help detect brain conditions

Digital pen might one day help detect brain conditions

Brain diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's can have a severe impact on people later in their life, and one of the biggest problems is detecting them early enough for effective treatments to begin. One way that doctors check for early signs is through patient's drawing irregularities, i.e. distortions in shapes and how long it takes to finish a drawing. Unfortunately, these irregularities, like signs of brain diseases, can be easily overlooked due to a doctor's opinion. But MIT researchers think a digital pen with tracking software could help improve detection.

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The Drinkable Book filters water for drinking

The Drinkable Book filters water for drinking

It can be very hard to get drinkable water in some parts of the world where utility systems are non-existent or unreliable. For many people in rural parts of the world getting water to drink can be a big undertaking and at times clean water is simply not available. A researcher named Theresa Dankovich has discovered a cheap and easy to transport method to purify drinking water.

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Apple’s autonomous car may be headed to the test track

Apple’s autonomous car may be headed to the test track

Apple is negotiating to use a former California naval base to test out its Project Titan car, new documents confirm, hinting that self-driving vehicles may be let loose on the 2,100 acre site. GoMentum Station, near San Francisco, has reinvented itself as a proving ground for self-driving cars and connected vehicle technology but, more importantly perhaps to Apple, its roughly 20 miles of paved city streets and highways are kept secure by military police.

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Humans are using up nature’s resources ‘budget’ faster than ever

Humans are using up nature’s resources ‘budget’ faster than ever

On Thursday, Global Footprint Network issued a statement saying that over the past eight months, humans have “used up nature’s budget” for 2015, meaning the remainder of the year will be spent using up resources and impacting Earth in such a way that is, in the long term, unsustainable. Carbon sequestration is said to be responsible for more than 50 percent of the demand on nature. Humanity’s ecological footprint continues to exceed our planet’s biocapacity — that is, nature’s ability to keep up with our demands.

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Stressed bears suggest drones are animal menace

Stressed bears suggest drones are animal menace

The FAA aren't the only ones taking issue with drones, with new research suggesting unmanned aerial vehicles are stressing out animals more than previously believed. The study, carried out in Minnesota, found that repeated UAV flights overhead left black bears in an agitated state, something which had been missed as the animals froze when the drones were nearby.

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Jupiter’s twin is tiniest planet ever seen outside our Solar System

Jupiter’s twin is tiniest planet ever seen outside our Solar System

Using the Gemini Planet Imager, researchers have discovered a planet near the star 51 Eridani consistent in size and formation with our own Jupiter. This planet has been dubbed 51 Eridani b or "51 Eri b", and has a luminosity low enough to be consistent with the cold-start core accretion process that may have kickstarted Jupiter. At the same time, this planet's possible hot-start formation models indicate a planet with twice the mass of Jupiter. Jupiter is the largest planet in the solar system at 318 times the size of our Earth - imagine a planet twice that size.

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ISS pictures are being used to map global light pollution

ISS pictures are being used to map global light pollution

A project called Cities at Night is using photographs taken by astronauts from the International Space Station to map nightly light pollution in cities across the world. The project started last summer, and requires the mapping of more than 130,000 high-resolution photographs using geo-centric details. This project is looking at the amount of light produced by cities across the entire globe, including the smaller sources of scattered light in addition to the bigger, more obvious points of light pollution.

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MIT shows off trio of robots that work together to deliver meds and drinks

MIT shows off trio of robots that work together to deliver meds and drinks

One of the places that robots will eventually find themselves working is in the medical setting. There are shortages of qualified medical professionals around the world and that shortage leaves staff overworked at times. MIT researchers are showing off three robots that are designed to work closely together to get tasks done ranging from delivering medications to getting people drinks when they need them.

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Researchers create efficient origami-inspired military shelters

Researchers create efficient origami-inspired military shelters

Researchers at the University of Notre Dame have created, with funding from the U.S. Army, a deployable mobile shelter that is both energy efficient and relatively easy to construct in the field. These mobile shelters were designed based on origami principles, and are unfolded in a similar manner, being assembled from sections that fold flat for transporting. There are several benefits to the mobile shelters, but the most important is arguably their efficiency.

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The Universe is dying – across all wavelengths

The Universe is dying – across all wavelengths

While it's been widely accepted that the Universe is slowly fading since the late 1990s, a study published today shows the great extent to which its death is occurring. "The Universe has basically sat down on the soft, pulled up a blanket, and is about to nod off for an eternal doze," suggested Simon Driver of ICRAR, lead author on the study. Measurements of energy output of each of 200,000 galaxies has been done at 21 wavelengths, from far infrared back down to ultraviolet. As broad a wavelength range as possible was studied by researchers who've now concluded that, yes, the Universe is indeed fading out.

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Research suggests music might one day help with epilepsy treatments

Research suggests music might one day help with epilepsy treatments

A group of researchers from Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have made a new discovery about those with epilepsy and how the brain processes music. The team, led by neurologist Christine Charyton, based their research on the fact that 80% of epileptic seizures begin in the temporal lobes, the same region of the brain as the auditory cortex, the part that processes sound and music. The discovery is that the brainwaves of those with the disorder tend to synchronize with music.

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Study claims that the universe is slowly dying

Study claims that the universe is slowly dying

The conclusion to an astronomical study has been published that claims the universe is slowly dying. The results of the study claims to have established the decline of the universe with unprecedented precision. An international team of 100 scientists used data from the most powerful telescopes in the world, both on land and in space, for the study.

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