research

Researchers find oldest evidence of human warfare

Researchers find oldest evidence of human warfare

The oldest evidence of warfare between humans has been unearthed in Kenya, revealing that about 10,000 years ago a group of people were attacked and killed with primitive weapons. In total, remains belonging to 27 individuals were found in Northern Kenya about 20 miles away from Lake Turkana. This region has proven very fruitful for researchers in the past, being about where the oldest ever stone tools were found.

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Whales wash ashore in England, one explodes during probe

Whales wash ashore in England, one explodes during probe

A fifth sperm whale has washed ashore on a beach in England, this one being spotted some time this past weekend. The whales have been found beached on the eastern coast of England, with the first being found in Hunstanton, Norfolk last Friday. Another three deceased beached whales were found in Skegness a short while later, and the fifth was most recently found in Wainfleet, Lincolnshire.

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Space may be filled with plasma ‘noodles’

Space may be filled with plasma ‘noodles’

According to a new report, the Milky Way may be home to so-called plasma lenses that are shaped like noodles, or sometimes like hazelnuts or lasagna sheets. These plasma lenses are invisible, and details about them first started surfacing some three decades ago; researchers found signs of them near quasars. These pockets of plasma have largely remained a mystery, but a recent breakthrough has revealed their shapes.

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CT scan of soft-bodied leech opens door to new research

CT scan of soft-bodied leech opens door to new research

Researchers have successfully performed a CT scan of Chtonobdella tanae, a terrestrial leech with a soft body that is typically difficult to scan. When it comes to such invertebrates — those with a soft body, that is — researchers usually must dissect the creature to learn about its inner part, or section it and create a 3D model using those sections. A CT scan, though, produces a model much quicker and without killing the specimen.

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Scientists say Terminator would be scary, that we shouldn’t make one

Scientists say Terminator would be scary, that we shouldn’t make one

A gathering of elite scientists made warning to the world this week that Terminator-type robots would be a bad idea. With striking foresight, these scientists have foretold of a time in which we could be at the mercy of autonomous machines, artificial intelligence behind weapons, and a future in which we'd have to watch out for individual attacks, if not just a full-scale war. This is real. Scientists have come together to say that we cannot trust the machines.

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Researcher says aliens are quiet because they are dead

Researcher says aliens are quiet because they are dead

All you have to do is look up at the night sky to see how many stars are out there, many with Earth-like worlds orbiting the star. Scientists searching for alien life have often wondered why with so many potentially habitable planets orbiting the plethora of stars in the universe, why haven't we heard any signs of other intelligent life.

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Researchers find why it’s so hard to break bad habits

Researchers find why it’s so hard to break bad habits

We’re almost a month into those New Year resolutions, but many have already broken them or failed. If you count yourself among those individuals, your lack of success might be due to the seemingly impossible task of breaking a habit — bad or otherwise. It’s well established that changing one’s ways isn’t easy, and researchers have discovered why — you’re literally going against your programming.

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Venus flytraps ‘count’ touches to optimize eating bugs

Venus flytraps ‘count’ touches to optimize eating bugs

Venus flytraps are creepy enough on their own — they’re plants that bite down on whatever happens to wonder inside their ‘mouth,’ after all, digesting the poor unwitting creature. As it turns out, though, the plants are more complex than previously known, using a fairly sophisticated ‘counting’ method to determine the size of a bug and how much digestive juices it will take to eat it.

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If your password is on this list, you’re asking to be hacked

If your password is on this list, you’re asking to be hacked

You'd think, with the number of times cloud services are hacked and online retailers' data stolen, that we'd be more proactive with passwords. You'd be wrong. Once again, the research suggests that when it comes to being safe online, the credentials we pick are more about pop-culture and convenience than keeping other people out of our accounts.

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Dissolving sensor can be used to measure intracranial pressure

Dissolving sensor can be used to measure intracranial pressure

A team of researchers from the University of Illinois led by professor John Rogers has designed an implantable sensor that can be injected into the brain to monitor intracranial pressure and temperature for about five days. That is the length of time where the pressure and temperature inside the head need to be monitored after some sort of traumatic brain injury.

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