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Smartphone attachment lets smartphones image DNA

Smartphone attachment lets smartphones image DNA

Researchers from the University of California, LA also known as UCLA have developed a new device that is able to turn any ,a href="http://www.slashgear.com/tags/smartphone/">smartphone into a DNA scanning fluorescent microscope. This microscope allows a smartphone to image DNA, which is about 50,000 times thinner than a single human hair.

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NASA Messenger mission comes to an end, crashes into Mercury

NASA Messenger mission comes to an end, crashes into Mercury

After ten years in space, NASA's Messenger probe purposefully crashed on Mercury. The probe spent four years in a strictly elliptical orbit, using boosts of power from its engine every couple of months, before it finally ran out of fuel. After orbiting Mercury 4,104 times, NASA decided to purposefully crash the probe into the planet's surface using a string of precisely modeled manuevers. When Messenger finally crashed, it hit Mercury at 8,750 mph (14,000 kph) which is about 12 times the speed of sound on earth.

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Pluto no longer just “a point of light”

Pluto no longer just “a point of light”

We're approaching Pluto as we speak. NASA's New Horizons probe is headed towards the most controversial of our planetary siblings, and this week they've shown some of the closest images we've ever bore witness to in the history of humanity. According to New Horizons principal investigator Alan Stern, of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado, "[these images] are just a little bit better than anything that's ever been obtained in history." Details are inbound. Details like a possible polar ice cap at one or both ends of this perpetually cold planetary body.

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3D-printed splint keeps babies breathing

3D-printed splint keeps babies breathing

This isn't the first time we've seen printed bio-materials find a place in the medical sphere. Last month a bio-printer created an implantable nose made from 3D-printed cartilage. In this case, a team of researchers from the University of Michigan created tracheal splints from 3D-printed bio-material that can be inserted into a child's windpipe to treat tracheobronchomalacia, a condition that causes spontaneous airway collapse. Babies born with the condition are often given a terminal diagnosis and shortened lifespan.

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DORA telepresence robot works with Oculus Rift

DORA telepresence robot works with Oculus Rift

There are several telepresence robots on the market today that are typically nothing more than an iPad mounted on a remote control base that can be driven around. The DORA (Dexterous Observational Roving Automaton) is designed to make the operator feel like he or she is actually at the remote location. DORA was created by robotics researchers from the University of Pennsylvania.

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Blood Falls give hope for life on Mars

Blood Falls give hope for life on Mars

In Antarctica, Blood Falls spew forth unto the white landscape, gushing dark red liquid into the purity of the snow and ice. This unsettling image is giving scientists hope that one day they might find a mass equally strange on the Red Planet. Blood Falls belch deep water from far beneath the surface of the Antarctic dry valley, showing how areas of low resistivity can be found in areas where otherwise dry permafrost or otherwise high resistivity in glacier ice are dominant. In this brine that bursts from the ice, life can be found.

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Our Universe might just be a hologram

Our Universe might just be a hologram

What's that, you say - our universe is a figment of our imagination? Not so much. When you hear the world "hologram", you might immediately assume that we're talking about something akin to Princess Leia being projected by R2-D2 in Star Wars. She's there, but only sort of. In a study produced by Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien) this week, mathematical researchers suggest that there's a possibility that our universe is, indeed, a hologram. We might just be living in a 2D space, rather than 3.

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Super-strong robot pulls 100x its own weight, even climbs up walls

Super-strong robot pulls 100x its own weight, even climbs up walls

If I could carry 100 times my own weight, I'd never need to twist the arms of all my friends to help me move. Until I gain super-strength, I'll have to settle for dreaming of borrowing these tenacious robots. A team of mechanical engineers from California's Standford University developed a collection of tiny robots which can give Marvel's Ant-Man a run for his money. Don't let the size of these tiny robots deceive you. These 'bots are incredibly strong; they can pull 100 times their own weight.

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