research

The language of wolves: study finds howling ‘dialects’

A team of researchers have found that wolves speak in distinct howling 'dialects,' doing so with the aid of an algorithm that analyzed in excess of 2,000 recordings of howling. A total of 13 canid species/subspecies, including dogs and wolves, were processed and the result was a roster of 21 howling styles with distinctly similar features. Wolves, for their part, howl in certain ways depending on their species.

Continue Reading

Andy Rubin plans Gmail model for AI-teaching dashcam

Android creator and former Google exec Andy Rubin wants to give you a dashboard camera, but you have to agree to help him build an Artificial Intelligence in return. Speculation about the serial inventor's current project have escalated in the months since he left Google and established Playground, a collaborative incubator for next-generation technologies, and now Rubin is giving a hint of what's to come.

Continue Reading

Robo-roach takes search & rescue tips from maligned pest

Cockroaches may not sound the most likely of search & rescue heroes, but robots borrowing the pests' ability to squeeze through the tiniest cracks might revolutionize post-disaster triaging. Researchers at the PolyPEDAL Lab at UC Berkeley are taking the roaches as inspiration, cooking up prototype rescue-bots that can compress their bodies down without impeding their ability to move.

Continue Reading

New liquid crystal mixtures keep touchscreens from freezing

Researchers from the University of Central Florida have been working to develop new liquid crystal mixtures for use in LCDs inside cars and other devices that are able to operate at both high and low temperatures. The goal of the team of researchers is to create a display screen that performs just as well in temperature extremes as it does in moderate climates. According to the team, current LCDs have images that blur and displays are slow to respond in extreme temperatures.

Continue Reading

DARPA: ‘stentrode’ implant travels to brain via blood vessels

Under DARPA’s Reliable Neural-Interface Technology program, a team from the University of Melbourne has created a new device called a ‘stentrode’ that, when implanted near one’s brain, is able to read signals from neurons. The work was done as part of a DARPA project, and it is said to be safer than implants requiring brain surgery. The device is about the size of a paperclip, according to the researchers, and it is implanted through a blood vessel.

Continue Reading

NOAA: US droughts are shrinking thanks to crazy weather

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has released its newest State of the Climate report, and in it we see weather that was all over the place in January 2016, at some points being drastically different on one side of the country versus the other. Several anomalies were observed, but there’s good news among it all: this crazy weather, largely due to El Nino, has caused droughts across the country to continue shrinking, particularly good news for states like California.

Continue Reading

Heliatek organic photovoltaic panels set new record for efficiency

Solar panels hold much promise for creating power from the free energy that the Sun releases each day. The catch is that solar panels are very inefficient at converting solar energy into electricity. Research is constantly being conducted into making solar panels more efficient at the conversion process and a research team from Heliatek has set a new record for organic solar panel efficiency.

Continue Reading

NASA Juno spacecraft adjusts course for July 4 Jupiter arrival

NASA has announced that adjustments had been made this week to the course of its Juno spacecraft, which is on its way to the planet Jupiter. On Wednesday, the space agency carried out an "engine burn," firing the spacecraft's thrusters to put it on track to arrive at the solar system's largest planet on July 4th of this year. The solar-powered Juno is now roughly 425 million miles from Earth, and only 51 million miles from its destination.

Continue Reading

Facebook usage increases with sleep deprivation, says study

Is your amount of Facebook usage going up recently? It might be because you're not getting enough sleep. Researchers at the University of California Irvine have conducted a study recently that shows a direct connection between sleep deprivation and spending more time on Facebook. Now, this isn't the same as frequently being on Facebook leading to poor sleep patterns, but rather the opposite.

Continue Reading

Battery charging tech turns seawater into fresh water

Researchers with the University of Illinois’ Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering have revealed that battery charging technology could end up being a viable desalination method, turning seawater into fresh water. This process works by putting seawater in a modified battery and then charging the battery with electricity, causing the salt ions to be pulled from the water.

Continue Reading

New Johnny Cash Spider discovered near Folsom Prison

You might be able to guess right off the bat where the spider "Aphonopelma johnnycashi" got its name. Having been discovered in the desert southwest, right near Folsom Prison in Folsom, California, this particular spider has been named after the musician famous for having played a concert at the prison/venue back in 1968: Johnny Cash himself. And it's not alone. This spider is just one of a set of new tarantulas that are being added to the pack this week.

Continue Reading

Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next