research

This ‘Chemical Laptop’ will help NASA detect life on other planets

This ‘Chemical Laptop’ will help NASA detect life on other planets

While NASA's rovers are used to explore the surface of other planets, the agency's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has developed a "Chemical Laptop" that could accompany missions and be used to help detect signs of life. NASA describes the Chemical Laptop as akin to a small, portable laboratory capable of analyzing samples to identify materials associated with life, such as amino acids and fatty acids.

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This is how much groundwater Earth has left

This is how much groundwater Earth has left

Finding water on other planets, particularly on Mars, might be an exciting discovery and might give some hope for the future of mankind. But that perhaps shouldn't distract us from the real problem at hand: our own depleting water resources. Groundwater, in particular, is the most commonly used manifestation of water on the planet. As such, it is also the most exploited and most often taken for granted. A group of scientists from different universities published on Nature Geoscience the findings of the first data-driven survey of the earth's groundwater supply. And the results are a bit worrying.

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100bn megaton superflares make “most Earth-like” planet a no-go

100bn megaton superflares make “most Earth-like” planet a no-go

One of the planets earmarked as potentially most Earth-like is dissuading guests, with the discovery of vast superflares rendering it inhospitable. Researchers had believed Kepler-438b to be the most similar to our own planet as any discovered by the Kepler space telescope to-date, coming close both in size and temperature to Earth, but it turns out our suns are very different.

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FingerAngle challenges 3D Touch with finger angle recognition

FingerAngle challenges 3D Touch with finger angle recognition

Researchers at Qeexo, a spin-off of Carnegie Mellon University, have developed a technology for interacting with touchscreens that easily rivals Apple's 3D Touch and its pressure-sensitivity features. It's called FingerTouch, and instead of relying on display hardware, it's an algorithm that can determine the exact angle at which a finger is making contact with the screen. Because it's software based, it can work with the existing display hardware that's widely available.

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Alzheimer’s drug surprises researchers, reverses aging in mice

Alzheimer’s drug surprises researchers, reverses aging in mice

Researchers with the Salk Institute of Biological Studies stumbled across unexpected anti-aging effects when working with an experimental Alzheimer’s treatment drug called J147. Unlike common methods for treating Alzheimer’s, which are largely ineffective, the drug candidate works by targeting old age, the biggest risk factor when it comes to the disease. The drug was demonstrated to be successful at preventing and reversing Alzheimer’s in mice, and it also made the mice younger.

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Huawei has batteries charging 10x faster, 50% in 5 mins

Huawei has batteries charging 10x faster, 50% in 5 mins

In these days when smartphones flaunt octa-core processors of insane raw power, batteries have become the next most important and sought after spec. After all, the most powerful smartphone would be practically worthless if it lasted only half a day or so. Huawei, who also makes its own mobile processors, is well aware of that need. And now thanks to its Watt Lab research arm, it may have finally reached a solution, promising a lithium-ion battery that will leave even current quick charge batteries today in the dust.

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Researchers: exoplanet’s winds blast at 5,400MPH

Researchers: exoplanet’s winds blast at 5,400MPH

Researchers at the University of Warwick, the same university responsible for the picture of a planet with a blood red ring, have discovered an exoplanet beyond our solar system that has hellish blasting winds. The discovery is notable for more than one reason, but chiefly because it is the first time ever that scientists have mapped and measured the weather on a planet beyond our solar system.

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Researchers create ‘porous liquid’ able to capture carbon

Researchers create ‘porous liquid’ able to capture carbon

Scientist have created what they say is a ‘porous liquid’ able to, among other things, capture carbon, making it one possible way to tackle the world’s pollution problem. The development was made by researchers at Queen’s University Belfast, specifically its School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering. The researchers worked in conjunction with scientists from the University of Liverpool in the United Kingdom, as well as unspecified international partners.

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Self-driving cars may need to be bad drivers to succeed

Self-driving cars may need to be bad drivers to succeed

A self-driving car getting pulled over by traffic police sounds like the subject of an xkcd comic, but Google's autonomous run-in with the law shows the robots have a lot to learn. Getting stopped for driving too slowly amid other traffic might only be the tip of the iceberg, in fact, and it's entirely possible that autonomous vehicles will need to learn to be worse on the road in order to fit in.

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Research reveals Stone Age humans made use of beehives

Research reveals Stone Age humans made use of beehives

The University of Bristol has published new research that show humans were actively farming and making use of beehive products at least 8,500 years ago. Going as far back as the Stone Age, evidence includes prehistoric rock art portraying honey hunters, as well as Egyptian murals depicting the act of beekeeping. However, what the research really uncovers is just how much of connection early farmers had with honeybees.

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