research

Stanford has a battery that charges in a minute

Stanford has a battery that charges in a minute

Batteries. The lifeblood of our mobile devices and ironically also somewhat their Achilles heel. Although the evolution of lithium-ion batteries has made all these portable electronic devices possible, they haven't really caught up with the growing power that we keep in our pockets. That's not even considering yet the similarly growing obsession over thinner devices, which would require thinner batteries that deliver the same power. Stanford University researchers, lead by chemistry professor Dai Hongjie, might have stumbled on the answer in a new variant of an aluminum-ion battery.

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Uber to hire slew of engineers, could be developing self-driving cars

Uber to hire slew of engineers, could be developing self-driving cars

Uber has big dreams, one of which might be to run fleets of self driving cars. The ride-share company is hitting the ground running as it looks to hire a range of positions including mechanical engineers from the automotive field and software engineers to work on sensors and vehicle controls. Nineteen positions were posted online today. The job listings are for Uber's newly established Advanced Technologies Center in Pittsburgh, which is a partnership with Carnegie Mellon University. This research center will act as an experimental lab where the top minds can solve problems blocking the path to driver-less vehicles.

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LHC is active again; proton beams online and firing

LHC is active again; proton beams online and firing

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is back in action today, firing proton beams around its 27-kilometer track. The LHC has been out of active commission for two years for upgrades, maintenance, and consolidation. The most recent delay was due to a short-circuit. Its repairs didn't take as long as originally anticipated, but were tedious because the parts in need of repair operate at temperatures near absolute zero. So, the device had to be slowly thawed and then painstakingly re-frozen before it could begin operation again.

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Caltech designs smartphone camera chip capable of 3D scanning

Caltech designs smartphone camera chip capable of 3D scanning

As one of the most popular new technologies, 3D printing is likely to continue its rapid growth in the consumer market over the next few years. With 3D printers becoming more common in homes, another possible growth might be in the use of 3D scanners. Users find something they'd like to make a replica of, and with a few quick photos they can go home and get to work. This could become even easier than expected, as a team of researchers at Caltech have designed a new camera chip that would allow your smartphone to take those 3D scans.

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New black hole theory: Matter doesn’t disappear after entering

New black hole theory: Matter doesn’t disappear after entering

Black holes hold unfathomable mysteries, the most mysterious among them is the question of what happens to matter once it is sucked into the black hole. Scientists no longer think that it is lost and irretrievable forever. The latest theory provides a mathematical solution to the "loss paradox" that has plagued black hole physicists. This theory maintains that matter which enters a black hole still exists, in some form, actually disproving Stephen Hawking's theory of material destruction by black holes.

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Exoskeleton boots take the stress out of walking

Exoskeleton boots take the stress out of walking

It might look like a prosthetic limb or a cybernetic leg, but these "boots", if you can still call them that, are something perfectly normal and capable people can use. What for, you ask? Well nothing more than to actually conserve energy. Humans have evolved to walk on two legs, that much is true. But that doesn't mean we've already reached the most efficient, energy-saving way to walk. That is what this exoskeleton pair are trying to accomplish, trying to reduce that amount of energy you expend while walking.

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Smartphones are sole source of Internet for 7% of Americans

Smartphones are sole source of Internet for 7% of Americans

Though data caps can still be an issue for many, mobile Internet speeds are on the upswing and tethering options abound...even among many prepaid smartphone plans. Most people have a home Internet connection that meets most of their needs, however, leaving the smartphone as a supplement to be used while away from home. For 7-percent of Americans, however, that's not the case, with them relying entirely on their smartphone as their primary/only Internet connection. Not surprisingly, specific groups tend to rely primarily on their phones for Internet access, including young people.

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‘Spooky action’ quantum superpositioning may disprove Einstein

‘Spooky action’ quantum superpositioning may disprove Einstein

A team of scientists may have disproven Einstein by proving quantum superposition. Physics can be difficult to understand, quantum mechanics is even more so. Even Einstein took a "why not both?" approach to tackling the wave and particle behaviors of light. One thing Einstein did not reconcile was particle superposition. Quantum superpositioning is the theory that subatomic particles have the ability to be in more than one state at the same time. Einstein actually didn't give any credence to the theory and dubbed it "spooky action at a distance."

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DARPA working on new GPS systems that needs no satellites

DARPA working on new GPS systems that needs no satellites

DARPA is always working on developing new technologies to help the military perform tasks that will protect the country and often that tech spills over into civilian life as well. One of the things that DARPA is working on right now is a reinvention of the GPS system that doesn't rely on satellites. This reinvention is part of DARPA's goal of ensuring American superiority in the air, maritime, ground, space, and cyber domains.

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