research

Mammoth skull found in Oklahoma sand pit

Mammoth skull found in Oklahoma sand pit

A giant mammoth skull has been unearthed in an Oklahoma sand pit, as well as fragments from a pair of tusks and some teeth. The skull is described as "partial," in that there are some pieces missing. However, images show that it is largely intact and is easily recognizable as a skull. No other skeletal parts are present around the skull, and there are no "cultural associations," according to the Oklahoma Archaeological Survey.

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Researchers show off first ever quantum Fredkin gate

Researchers show off first ever quantum Fredkin gate

Researchers working together from the University of Queensland and Griffith University have demonstrated a key quantum logic operation that is required for quantum computing to move forward. The team demonstrated for the first time a quantum Fredkin gate powered by entanglement that operates on photonic qubits. One of the key challenges to creating a quantum computer has been in the need to minimize the resources needed to implement processing circuits.

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MIT hacked a Xbox Kinect to create a reflection-free camera

MIT hacked a Xbox Kinect to create a reflection-free camera

When taking photos, whether it be of sights or people, sometimes shooting through a window is unavoidable, and that means there's probably going to be glare or reflections. Turns out, researchers at MIT's Media Lab are looking to address this, as their Camera Culture Group is developing a camera that can take photos through glass without any reflections. For their latest project they used the Xbox One's Kinect motion sensor and camera, taking advantage of its depth sensor.

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New research suggests Saturn’s rings & moons may be younger than dinosaurs

New research suggests Saturn’s rings & moons may be younger than dinosaurs

The most iconic feature of the planet Saturn — it's wide set of rings — along with its many icy moons may actually be much younger than previously thought. A new study published by the SETI Institute says that Saturn's rings and inner moons may be no more than 100 million years old, meaning they likely formed when dinosaurs roamed the Earth. That would make them about 4 billion years younger than the planet Saturn itself.

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Yellowstone hotspot had 12 ancient ‘super-eruptions’

Yellowstone hotspot had 12 ancient ‘super-eruptions’

Some really big eruptions happened during Yellowstone’s past, but they all may pale in comparison to a bunch of so-called “super eruptions” that took place in Idaho millions of years ago. According to researchers, these exceptionally massive eruptions happened between 8 and 12 million years ago, and were much, much larger than previously believed, eclipsing a bunch of ancient eruptions that happened in the same general region.

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Strange newly discovered cavefish can walk up cave walls

Strange newly discovered cavefish can walk up cave walls

It’s not everyday you see a fish that can walk, but just such a discovery was made by researchers with the New Jersey Institute of Technology. The cavefish was found in Thailand and features an unusual anatomy giving it the ability to climb its way up waterfalls -- something researchers believe could help shed light on evolutionary changes that happened many millions of years ago. No other (living) fish have been discovered with this ability.

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Samsung brainBAND tracks concussions in athletes

Samsung brainBAND tracks concussions in athletes

Samsung Electronics Australia has rolled out a new bit of tech called the brainBAND that is designed to help coaches and medics keep up with concussion injuries in athletes. The brainBAND is a wearable device and the prototype was developed via the Samsung Launching People program that puts a pair of researchers from different backgrounds together to see how tech can help solve challenges in society.

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NASA says moon spin axis shifted by 5-degrees 3 billion years ago

NASA says moon spin axis shifted by 5-degrees 3 billion years ago

NASA has discovered evidence via research that it funded that indicates eons ago the surface of the moon might have looked different from Earth. According to the research the spin axis of the moon shifted by about 5-degrees around 3 billion years ago. Evidence of this movement was found in how ancient lunar ice is distributed seen as evidence of water delivered to the early solar system.

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Homes of the future could be powered by old, ugly tomatoes

Homes of the future could be powered by old, ugly tomatoes

Tomatoes: they’re acidic, tasty, and sometimes ugly. The especially ugly tomatoes usually don’t make it to market, at least not in ordinary supermarkets, nor do the ones that were damaged or started to go bad during harvest. This translates into a lot of tomato waste, something our increasingly resource-conscious world finds unfortunate. Enter the American Chemical Society and a new project it has detailed: turning waste tomatoes into biofuel cells.

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Study: prairie dogs are fluffy little serial squirrel killers

Study: prairie dogs are fluffy little serial squirrel killers

Prairie dogs are adorable, yes, but they’d rip your brain out in a sweet second if they were big enough. Such is the conclusion we’ve drawn from a new study on prairie dogs’ homicidal behavior. Researchers observed the critters for a handful of years and during that time discovered the brutal, coldly practical skeleton in a prairie dog's closet: it hunts down and kills baby squirrels so its own offspring can grow up fat and happy.

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Patch monitors glucose levels and delivers meds to control glucose

Patch monitors glucose levels and delivers meds to control glucose

Anyone who has been around a diabetic that has to prick their fingers multiple times a day to check their blood glucose levels can understand in an instant just how difficult and annoying the disease can be. Factor in the need for some diabetics to not only prick fingers to check glucose levels, but to give themselves shots of insulin to control the blood sugar and things only get worse for diabetics. Scientists have developed an innovative medical device that might make diabetes less of a prick.

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Bear bone reveals humans arrived in Ireland earlier than thought

Bear bone reveals humans arrived in Ireland earlier than thought

Humans arrived in Ireland earlier than believed, new research shows. The conclusion comes from the analysis of a bear bone found in a cave in Ireland and was announced this past weekend. According to researchers, humans arrived in Ireland about 2,500 years earlier than previously thought, dating the earliest evidence back to 10,500 BC rather than 8,000 BC.

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