research

Gravitational waves detected, creating “new means of observing the universe”

Gravitational waves detected, creating “new means of observing the universe”

Today scientists have announced the confirmed existence of gravitational waves, providing proof for one of Albert Einstein's most elusive predictions. These gravitational waves open a door to new scientific discoveries innumerable, showing ripples in the fabric of space and time in a way previously thought impossible. Ironically - sort of - this year also marks the 100th anniversary of Einstein's publication of his prediction of the existence of these gravitational waves, all the way back in 1915.

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Drones can autonomously follow forest paths with new software

Drones can autonomously follow forest paths with new software

There are hoards of people around the world who enjoy getting outdoors and hiking through paths in the forest and mountains. Sometimes when people unfamiliar with the terrain venture out accidents happen leading to injury or lost hikers. Typically finding these lost or injured hikers involves an expensive search with lots of people and often helicopters to search from the sky.

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Researchers ‘beautifully preserve’ rabbit brain using cryonics

Researchers ‘beautifully preserve’ rabbit brain using cryonics

Researchers have successfully preserved a rabbit’s brain using cryopreservation technology, the Brain Preservation Foundation has announced. The work was done by 21st Century Medicine’s researchers, and used an Aldehyde-stabilized procedure to preserve and store the brain without damaging the neural circuits, opening the door for very long term storage and preservation efforts. The study has been published in Cryobiology.

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Hale, hearty, and horny: Sonos and Apple study tests if music matters

Hale, hearty, and horny: Sonos and Apple study tests if music matters

Could listening to Beyoncé make food taste better, streaming Slipknot make you more frisky, or slapping on Paul McCartney's greatest hits make your kids do chores? Turns out the answer might be yes to all three, with Sonos bankrolling a scientific study into the effect of music on home life.

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Scientists think a medium-size asteroid impact could cause a mini ice age

Scientists think a medium-size asteroid impact could cause a mini ice age

It's not hard for us to think about what would happen to the Earth and life on our planet if a meteor impacted the surface. There have been several movies that showed what might happen in the event of an asteroid impact. A large enough asteroid could end all life on the planet leaving Earth devoid of life. A new study looks at what might happen to Earth if it were hit with a medium-size asteroid.

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Scientists discover two new fossil fish species with gigantic mouths

Scientists discover two new fossil fish species with gigantic mouths

There are still massive species of whales and other types of sea creatures that eat some of the smallest creatures in the sea known as plankton. In the distant past, there were massive sea creatures who feasted on the same sort of plankton in the ocean waters and scientists have found two new examples of plankton-eating fossilized fish. The new fossils are in the genus Rhinconichthys and swam in the oceans of the Cretaceous Period about 92 million years ago.

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The language of wolves: study finds howling ‘dialects’

The language of wolves: study finds howling ‘dialects’

A team of researchers have found that wolves speak in distinct howling 'dialects,' doing so with the aid of an algorithm that analyzed in excess of 2,000 recordings of howling. A total of 13 canid species/subspecies, including dogs and wolves, were processed and the result was a roster of 21 howling styles with distinctly similar features. Wolves, for their part, howl in certain ways depending on their species.

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Andy Rubin plans Gmail model for AI-teaching dashcam

Andy Rubin plans Gmail model for AI-teaching dashcam

Android creator and former Google exec Andy Rubin wants to give you a dashboard camera, but you have to agree to help him build an Artificial Intelligence in return. Speculation about the serial inventor's current project have escalated in the months since he left Google and established Playground, a collaborative incubator for next-generation technologies, and now Rubin is giving a hint of what's to come.

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Robo-roach takes search & rescue tips from maligned pest

Robo-roach takes search & rescue tips from maligned pest

Cockroaches may not sound the most likely of search & rescue heroes, but robots borrowing the pests' ability to squeeze through the tiniest cracks might revolutionize post-disaster triaging. Researchers at the PolyPEDAL Lab at UC Berkeley are taking the roaches as inspiration, cooking up prototype rescue-bots that can compress their bodies down without impeding their ability to move.

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New liquid crystal mixtures keep touchscreens from freezing

New liquid crystal mixtures keep touchscreens from freezing

Researchers from the University of Central Florida have been working to develop new liquid crystal mixtures for use in LCDs inside cars and other devices that are able to operate at both high and low temperatures. The goal of the team of researchers is to create a display screen that performs just as well in temperature extremes as it does in moderate climates. According to the team, current LCDs have images that blur and displays are slow to respond in extreme temperatures.

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DARPA: ‘stentrode’ implant travels to brain via blood vessels

DARPA: ‘stentrode’ implant travels to brain via blood vessels

Under DARPA’s Reliable Neural-Interface Technology program, a team from the University of Melbourne has created a new device called a ‘stentrode’ that, when implanted near one’s brain, is able to read signals from neurons. The work was done as part of a DARPA project, and it is said to be safer than implants requiring brain surgery. The device is about the size of a paperclip, according to the researchers, and it is implanted through a blood vessel.

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NOAA: US droughts are shrinking thanks to crazy weather

NOAA: US droughts are shrinking thanks to crazy weather

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has released its newest State of the Climate report, and in it we see weather that was all over the place in January 2016, at some points being drastically different on one side of the country versus the other. Several anomalies were observed, but there’s good news among it all: this crazy weather, largely due to El Nino, has caused droughts across the country to continue shrinking, particularly good news for states like California.

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