research

Scientists mistook microwave interference for alien messages

Scientists mistook microwave interference for alien messages

Mistakes do happen even in science, which is the whole basis for the experimentation process. But there are some mistakes are just too embarrassing to make. Take for example this group of scientists who stumbled on what they thought could possibly be messages from intelligent lifeforms in outer space. Fact, however, couldn't be farther from the truth, or nearer to the scientists, in this case. Apparently, the source of the shorts bursts of energy was nothing more than their very own laboratory microwave.

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NASA’s Mercury probe is about to crash (and they couldn’t be happier)

NASA’s Mercury probe is about to crash (and they couldn’t be happier)

Normally a hugely expensive spacecraft crashing into a planet wouldn't be a cause for celebration, but NASA scientists are gleeful at the prospect later this month. Messenger, a probe launched back in 2004 and which has been orbiting Mercury for roughly the past four years, will very soon run out of propellant and go hurtling toward the surface. Rather than mourning it, however, NASA is positively embracing the destruction.

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NASA Spitzer Space Telescope discovers exoplanet 13,000 light years away

NASA Spitzer Space Telescope discovers exoplanet 13,000 light years away

NASA has used the Spitzer Space Telescope to discover many exoplanets and so far, most of those exoplanets have been relatively close in the cosmic scheme of things. The latest exoplanet that NASA has discovered with Spitzer is much farther away from the Earth than most previously discovered. The new planet is a distant gas giant that is about 13,000 light years away making it one of the most distant planets known to man.

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Tiny camera can power itself and other devices

Tiny camera can power itself and other devices

To innovators envisioning the Internet of Things, wherein everyday devices operate on a wireless, interconnected network, component size and battery life are incredibly important. This self-powered camera was created by a team of scientists from Columbia University, and the prototype may pave the way for future cameras to charge themselves as they capture images, negating the need to a battery pack or charger at all. They claim their discovery is the first self-powered camera that can harvest energy as it takes pictures.

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Watch the SpaceX rocket landing (now in video form)

Watch the SpaceX rocket landing (now in video form)

Before we'd only had tiny glimpses of the near-landing bit of the Falcon 9 rocket. Now we've got a fully operational video from off the starboard bow. This video shows how the rocket flew in at great speed, nearly - so very, very nearly - landing on the "Just Read The Instructions" autonomous sea craft. But with a final blast, it fell to the wayside. Time to try, try again, of course, as Elon Musk suggests they'll be approaching an 80% success rate by the end of this year.

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Verizon: Fear lazy IT staff not smartphone security

Verizon: Fear lazy IT staff not smartphone security

Many of the companies and organizations you trust your personal data to are storing it on unpatched and unprotected servers, Verizon has concluded, with carelessness a key contributor to data breaches. In fact, laziness in applying long-released security patches remains a primary weakness, the company's 2015 report discovered. However while mobile security has become a key talking point by Apple, Google, and others, each pitching their platform as the safest for users, the stats suggest the risk there is "negligible," in fact.

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SpaceX launch succeeds: even a crash is progress

SpaceX launch succeeds: even a crash is progress

As the latest Falcon 9 Dragon rocket took off yesterday, history was once again made by SpaceX. While some headlines suggest that the "landing" bit of this mission was a failure - we don't see it that way. The first part of the mission was to send supplies to the International Space Station - that part is in progress. The second part was to successfully land the Falcon 9 back on an autonomous barge in the Atlantic Ocean - it succeeded, but also failed. While the rocket is damaged enough now that it cannot be reused, SpaceX has again come far closer than any other organization at landing like this in history.

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Apple makes ResearchKit available to Devs and researchers

Apple makes ResearchKit available to Devs and researchers

ResearchKit has the capacity to truly change things. Today, Apple is letting Developers and researchers realize its promise, and has opened ResearchKit up to anyone who wants to contribute. Developers are now free to develop apps that utilize the framework, and researchers can begin new studies to aide in ramping up their studies. Announced at Apple’s March event, ResearchKit uses an iPhone as a diagnostic tool when users opt-in to providing data. On launch, Apple and a few select partners had medical studies relating to Breast Cancer, Parkinson’s Disease, Asthma, and Cardiovascular Disease.

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Little boy finds big dinosaur fossil under future mall

Little boy finds big dinosaur fossil under future mall

The son of a zookeeper, Wylie Brys, discovered no less than a 100-million year old dinosaur bone whilst digging in the dirt this past September. The report is coming out now because between September 2014 and now, April of 2015, preparations have been underway to excavate and remove the fossil. Excavation took place over the past two days and the bone - or bones, as it turned out - were removed just today. The finding began back in September when Brys and his father were digging for fish bones in the area where a mall was set to be built.

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