research

Impoverished childhood may plant compulsion for overeating

Impoverished childhood may plant compulsion for overeating

Living in poverty during early childhood could result in a sort of “biological blueprint” that makes one prone to overeating later on in life, according to a new study. It is known that childhood poverty is an obesity risk factor, and researchers recently explored that fact, seeking to find the reason why. While that question has still not been conclusively answered, the researchers found a compulsion among those who were raised in poverty to eat when food is available rather than only when they are hungry.

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Wasp GPS could help smart drones find home faster

Wasp GPS could help smart drones find home faster

A decade of research figuring out how wasps navigate could help drones and self-piloting robots fly smarter, researchers in Australia claim, having concluded that once again nature has proved itself smarter than human inventors. The team examined the flight behaviors of ground-nesting wasps, which can fly significant distances but still find their way back home after foraging.

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DARPA FLA program for autonomous drones flight tests begin

DARPA FLA program for autonomous drones flight tests begin

DARPA has announced that it has begun flight testing in its latest drone program called Fast Lightweight Autonomy (FLA) and the initial round of tests was a success. The goal of FLA is to create small autonomous aircraft with sensors that allow the drones to avoid obstacles while achieving a desired speed of 20 meters per seconds. The main goal of the program is to develop and test algorithms that reduce the processing power, communications and human intervention needed for UAVs to perform certain low-level tasks.

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Network researchers achieve fastest ever data rate at 1.125 Tb/s

Network researchers achieve fastest ever data rate at 1.125 Tb/s

Researchers at University College London (UCL) have set a record for the fastest ever data rate for digital information. As part of research focusing on testing the capacity limits of optical transmission systems the team of researchers from the optical Networks Group achieved a data rate of 1.125 Tb/s. The research the team performs is part of efforts to increase the available data speeds for network systems in homes and businesses.

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3 things Rosetta and Philae taught us about comets

3 things Rosetta and Philae taught us about comets

As we bid farewell to the comet lander Philae for the last time, we look back and remember three important things we learned from the ESA's monumental mission. Several firsts were achieved by this lander sent to a comet by the European Space Agency's Rosetta mission. One: this was the first time that a craft such as this was successfully landed on a comet - not only that, but the first time such a lander was able to send back data on a comet from its surface, too!

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Belief in angry gods (probably) made humans more agreeable

Belief in angry gods (probably) made humans more agreeable

Fear of a supernatural smiting may have spurred human societies towards a more agreeable, cooperative future, researchers suggest. Human societies are very complex, of course, and all share the same propensities for religion — though the storylines and theological talking points vary from one religion to another, many have the same common denominator: angry, punitive, surveilling gods who knew when you did something you shouldn’t and weren't afraid to backhand you for it.

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How sly dog Microsoft is using Fetch! to feed us AI

How sly dog Microsoft is using Fetch! to feed us AI

Are weird apps like Microsoft's Fetch! the definition of Nero fiddling while the PC market burns, or is the Windows-maker cracked the code on consumer artificial intelligence? Fetch!, the latest gimmick from the Microsoft Garage idea incubator, sounds like a fairly pointless idea at first - identifying what breed of dog you show it - but it hides a cutting edge heart.

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Shoes harvest energy from walking to charge gadgets

Shoes harvest energy from walking to charge gadgets

It can be very tough to keep your gadgets charged up and ready to work or play all day if you aren't near an outlet. There are several solar chargers and portable battery packs out there but those aren't ideal in all situations. A team of researchers are working on a very novel way to charge your gadgets while you walk around in the form of a pair of shoes that have energy harvesting technology inside.

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Study: ‘PAMP’ molecules in processed foods are big health risk

Study: ‘PAMP’ molecules in processed foods are big health risk

Researchers have revealed that some processed foods, including things like chopped vegetables, sausages, and chocolates, have high instances of harmful pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP) molecules that could increase someone’s risks of developing various health issues, including Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Fresh foods, though, such as whole vegetables, have undetectable levels of these harmful bacteria.

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New polymer can retain shape changes, resets with body heat

New polymer can retain shape changes, resets with body heat

A team of University of Rochester researchers have developed a new polymer that may play a big part in the medical field in the future. The material is able to maintain a new shape after being stretched or manipulated, something in itself that isn't new, but the incredible part is that it then can be returned to its original shape with just body heat. The researchers say that's only half of their discovery, however, as during shape recovery the polymer is able to release a large amount of stored energy.

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Gravitational waves detected, creating “new means of observing the universe”

Gravitational waves detected, creating “new means of observing the universe”

Today scientists have announced the confirmed existence of gravitational waves, providing proof for one of Albert Einstein's most elusive predictions. These gravitational waves open a door to new scientific discoveries innumerable, showing ripples in the fabric of space and time in a way previously thought impossible. Ironically - sort of - this year also marks the 100th anniversary of Einstein's publication of his prediction of the existence of these gravitational waves, all the way back in 1915.

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Drones can autonomously follow forest paths with new software

Drones can autonomously follow forest paths with new software

There are hoards of people around the world who enjoy getting outdoors and hiking through paths in the forest and mountains. Sometimes when people unfamiliar with the terrain venture out accidents happen leading to injury or lost hikers. Typically finding these lost or injured hikers involves an expensive search with lots of people and often helicopters to search from the sky.

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