research

Strange newly discovered cavefish can walk up cave walls

Strange newly discovered cavefish can walk up cave walls

It’s not everyday you see a fish that can walk, but just such a discovery was made by researchers with the New Jersey Institute of Technology. The cavefish was found in Thailand and features an unusual anatomy giving it the ability to climb its way up waterfalls -- something researchers believe could help shed light on evolutionary changes that happened many millions of years ago. No other (living) fish have been discovered with this ability.

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Samsung brainBAND tracks concussions in athletes

Samsung brainBAND tracks concussions in athletes

Samsung Electronics Australia has rolled out a new bit of tech called the brainBAND that is designed to help coaches and medics keep up with concussion injuries in athletes. The brainBAND is a wearable device and the prototype was developed via the Samsung Launching People program that puts a pair of researchers from different backgrounds together to see how tech can help solve challenges in society.

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NASA says moon spin axis shifted by 5-degrees 3 billion years ago

NASA says moon spin axis shifted by 5-degrees 3 billion years ago

NASA has discovered evidence via research that it funded that indicates eons ago the surface of the moon might have looked different from Earth. According to the research the spin axis of the moon shifted by about 5-degrees around 3 billion years ago. Evidence of this movement was found in how ancient lunar ice is distributed seen as evidence of water delivered to the early solar system.

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Homes of the future could be powered by old, ugly tomatoes

Homes of the future could be powered by old, ugly tomatoes

Tomatoes: they’re acidic, tasty, and sometimes ugly. The especially ugly tomatoes usually don’t make it to market, at least not in ordinary supermarkets, nor do the ones that were damaged or started to go bad during harvest. This translates into a lot of tomato waste, something our increasingly resource-conscious world finds unfortunate. Enter the American Chemical Society and a new project it has detailed: turning waste tomatoes into biofuel cells.

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Study: prairie dogs are fluffy little serial squirrel killers

Study: prairie dogs are fluffy little serial squirrel killers

Prairie dogs are adorable, yes, but they’d rip your brain out in a sweet second if they were big enough. Such is the conclusion we’ve drawn from a new study on prairie dogs’ homicidal behavior. Researchers observed the critters for a handful of years and during that time discovered the brutal, coldly practical skeleton in a prairie dog's closet: it hunts down and kills baby squirrels so its own offspring can grow up fat and happy.

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Patch monitors glucose levels and delivers meds to control glucose

Patch monitors glucose levels and delivers meds to control glucose

Anyone who has been around a diabetic that has to prick their fingers multiple times a day to check their blood glucose levels can understand in an instant just how difficult and annoying the disease can be. Factor in the need for some diabetics to not only prick fingers to check glucose levels, but to give themselves shots of insulin to control the blood sugar and things only get worse for diabetics. Scientists have developed an innovative medical device that might make diabetes less of a prick.

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Bear bone reveals humans arrived in Ireland earlier than thought

Bear bone reveals humans arrived in Ireland earlier than thought

Humans arrived in Ireland earlier than believed, new research shows. The conclusion comes from the analysis of a bear bone found in a cave in Ireland and was announced this past weekend. According to researchers, humans arrived in Ireland about 2,500 years earlier than previously thought, dating the earliest evidence back to 10,500 BC rather than 8,000 BC.

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DARPA’s TNT program aims to stimulate rapid learning

DARPA’s TNT program aims to stimulate rapid learning

DARPA has a new program that aims to speed up a person’s rate of learning via peripheral nerve stimulation. The agency cites interest in synaptic plasticity and cognitive skills training in particular, and seeks technology able to precisely activate peripheral nerves. The program, dubbed Targeted Neuroplasticity Training (TNT), would reduce the Department of Defense’s training costs and speed up how quickly agents can be equipped with necessary skills and knowledge.

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Let’s ask: Are city birds smarter than country birds?

Let’s ask: Are city birds smarter than country birds?

A study has shown that not only are birds living in major cities smarter than their rural counterparts, they're more immune to diseases. While our dominance of land here on Earth has created a far smaller natural environment for birds over the past several thousand years, Jean-Nicolas Audet, a Ph.D student in the Department of Biology, says that urban birds have done more than just adapt to us, they've become more advanced amongst humans than out in the country on their own.

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Skydio drone can actually follow you while avoiding trees

Skydio drone can actually follow you while avoiding trees

Drones with the ability to follow the user and shoot video or still images are out there right now. The catch is that they only really work in environments where there are no obstacles that the drone needs to avoid. Put the same tracking drone into a forest environment with random tree branches and trunks and the drone is unable to avoid those obstacles.

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MIT researchers envision a future without traffic lights

MIT researchers envision a future without traffic lights

We have just barely reached the tip of the iceberg when it comes to self-driving cars but researcher's from MIT's "Senseable City Lab" are already preparing the theoretical ground work for one of that technology's biggest implications. Cars are slowly getting more independent of their human drivers and more interconnected with each other as well as other connected devices. In the future, this could translate to a sophisticated system that directs and manages the flow of cars at an intersection, without the use of traffic lights.

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CRACUNS land and sea drone can operate underwater

CRACUNS land and sea drone can operate underwater

Researchers with John Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory have created a new type of drone that is able to position itself beneath water, lying in wait until it is time for it to take off in the air. The drone is made using a corrosion-resistant material that can handle being submerged without suffering damage. As expected, the drone — dubbed the Corrosion Resistant Aerial Covert Unmanned Nautical System (CRACUNS)— is able to operate while underwater.

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