research

Study: you feel less guilty about causing pain when following orders

Study: you feel less guilty about causing pain when following orders

The question isn’t new: why is it that seemingly normal people are capable of committing terrible acts when told to do so? Instances of such actions are as old as time and span all sorts of situations — wars, abusive mentor/mentee relationships, and even experiments. Various studies have sought the answer, but commonly set their focus on the 'if' question -- if someone will do it and their subjective feelings about the actions. A new study, though, focuses on the 'why,' and its findings are disconcerting.

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Egypt’s Tarkhan dress is world’s oldest garment

Egypt’s Tarkhan dress is world’s oldest garment

The modern world has been given a glimpse of fashion as it existed 5,000 years ago. The Tarkhan dress, as it has been dubbed, is the oldest woven garment in the world, and though it is greatly degraded, it is easy to imagine how it looked thousands of years ago. The dress — which now looks more like a very thin shirt — was discovered in an Egyptian tomb, where it found inside-out and creased.

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Study maps climate change sensitivity around the globe

Study maps climate change sensitivity around the globe

Researchers have developed a new method for determining how sensitive a particular ecosystem is to climate change, finding that places like eastern parts of Australian, tropical rainforests, regions in central Asia and South America, and more are all particularly sensitive to such variations. Such data can be used in assessing ecosystems and anticipating how particular parts of the world will be affected by short and long term climate changes.

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Study: humans, neanderthals interbred earlier than thought

Study: humans, neanderthals interbred earlier than thought

Neanderthals and humans may have interbred must earlier than researchers had previously believed, according to a new study. Such a finding comes from a DNA analysis revealing what is (likely) an instance of human and neanderthal interbreeding many thousands of years before the oldest documented instance of such. If the analysis is correct, the interbreeding happened about 100,000 years ago.

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January 2016 holds new ‘warmest month’ record

January 2016 holds new ‘warmest month’ record

To absolutely no one's surprise, this past January is now the hottest of its kind on record, smashing the last hottest month record in what is a longstanding and unfortunate environmental trend. The record, which has been confirmed by NASA, hints that 2016 may end up smashing 2015’s own record (it is the warmest year ever recorded). For its part, January 2016 was more than 2F degrees hotter than average.

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Study finds rapid DNA changes in hatchery-raised trout

Study finds rapid DNA changes in hatchery-raised trout

Researchers with Oregon State University in conjunction with the Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife have found that fish (or, at least, steelhead trout) experience rapid DNA changes when raised in hatcheries rather than the wild. These changes are an adaption to the new environment that enable them to survive; the findings settle the ongoing debate about whether such rapid adaptions do, in fact, take place.

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Popular Heartburn Medicine May Be Linked To Dementia

Popular Heartburn Medicine May Be Linked To Dementia

Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medications intended to fight heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux suffered another setback today when study results were announced demonstrating a link between this class of drug and the incidence of dementia in elder patients. JAMA Neurology published the conclusions of a German study that examined the effect of PPI medication on 73,000 senior citizens aged 75 and older. While the study itself was unable to demonstrate a 'smoking gun' connecting the development of cognitive difficulties and the use of popular medicines sold under the trade names Nexium, Prevacid, and Prilosec, participants who did use PPIs were 44% more likely to suffer from dementia.

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FDA finds parmesan cut with wood pulp, cheaper cheeses

FDA finds parmesan cut with wood pulp, cheaper cheeses

As if it weren't bad enough that most olive oil is adulterated, a newly surfaced report from the FDA reveals that some parmesan cheese being sold by big-name stores and brands may not be parmesan cheese at all -- in some cases, the cheese has been cut with wood pulp or other (much cheaper) cheeses like cheddar. The beans were spilled (so to speak) after the Food and Drug Administration received a tip that led to a Pennsylvania cheese factory in late 2012. The location was Castle Cheese Inc, according to the documents, and it was found to be cutting its products with cheaper substitutions, changes that weren’t noted on the resulting product labels.

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3D bioprinter used to print a transplantable human ear

3D bioprinter used to print a transplantable human ear

Scientists have developed a new 3D bioprinter that has been successfully used to print a replacement human ear that could be transplanted to a patient in need. A human ear isn't all that the scientists have used the 3D printer to create, so far the team has created part of a jawbone, muscle, and cartilage structures in addition to the ear. The team is led by Anthony Atala from the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine and the printer is the result of almost a decade of work.

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Giant ‘gastornis’ bird definitely roamed Arctic 53m years ago

Giant ‘gastornis’ bird definitely roamed Arctic 53m years ago

A giant flightless bird called 'gastornis' did, in fact, roam the Arctic some 50 million years ago, researchers have confirmed. The proof? A fossilized toe bone from one of the birds, which had weighed several hundred pounds, was several feet tall, and had a head as big as that of a horse. University of Colorado Boulder and Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing researchers made the confirmation.

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Ancient asterid flowers found fossilized in amber

Ancient asterid flowers found fossilized in amber

A pair of ancient asterids have been found fossilized in a piece of amber, researchers have revealed. This marks the first instance of an asterid — a type of flower — being found in a fossilized state. Researchers describe the flower as being “perfectly preserved” as a fossil, and they say it was probably poisonous as it comes from the genus Strychnos. The fossils are estimated to be between 20 and 30 million years old.

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Impoverished childhood may plant compulsion for overeating

Impoverished childhood may plant compulsion for overeating

Living in poverty during early childhood could result in a sort of “biological blueprint” that makes one prone to overeating later on in life, according to a new study. It is known that childhood poverty is an obesity risk factor, and researchers recently explored that fact, seeking to find the reason why. While that question has still not been conclusively answered, the researchers found a compulsion among those who were raised in poverty to eat when food is available rather than only when they are hungry.

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