research

Disney Research shows off haptic telepresence robot

Disney Research shows off haptic telepresence robot

If you have ever been to a Disney park, you can understand why the company would be working on different types of robots. The part is filled with mechanical actors that move around and perform in many of the rides. Disney Research has unveiled a new telepresence robot that will have a much wider range of use than lip-synching "It's a Small World" in a creepy ride for kids. What the researchers at Disney Research have created is a new type of hydrostatic transmission that uses a hybrid air-water configuration.

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Doppio: a smartwatch prototype with a removable 2nd screen

Doppio: a smartwatch prototype with a removable 2nd screen

We're still waiting for some manufacturer, probably Samsung, to finally deliver the foldable, dual screen smartphone of our dreams. In the meantime, however, someone else is dreaming up the same thing for smartwatches. That someone is Xing-Dong Yang and his fellow researchers from Dartmouth College who presented the prototype of a smartwatch with two displays, one of them removable. In addition to showing a different or supplementary information, the position of the second display affects what is displayed on the primariy screen as well.

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This quadcopter drone can land on ceilings and walls

This quadcopter drone can land on ceilings and walls

We've seen consumer drones of various sizes, as well as those with varying camera and photography capabilities, but what about when it comes to landing on surfaces other than the ground? Research students at Stanford University have been exploring that exact idea, and have developed a quadcopter that can perch on the ceiling, as well as walls in a vertical position, just like a spider or insect.

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Audi is teaching its self-driving car human manners

Audi is teaching its self-driving car human manners

Audi is teaching its autonomous cars some thoroughly human road-manners, acknowledging that safe self-driving is about more than just sticking to the Vehicle Code. The German automaker has been running real-world tests of its autonomous fleet for several years now, most recently taking a self-driving A7 - dubbed "Jack" - out onto the A9 Autobahn.

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Origami robot is able to unfold and treat stomach injuries when swallowed

Origami robot is able to unfold and treat stomach injuries when swallowed

Researchers from the University of Sheffield, Tokyo Institute of Technology, and MIT have teamed up to demonstrate a new foldable origami robot that can be ingested and then controlled inside the stomach to treat internal wounds or remove things like button batteries from the stomach. Button batteries are at times swallowed by children and can cause great injury if left alone. The ingestible robot starts in a digestible capsule that is swallowed.

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Disney Researchers found a way to make faster RFID toys

Disney Researchers found a way to make faster RFID toys

Disney might have officially called it quits in publishing its own digital games, but it isn't completely throwing in the towel in researching the best ways to make those. Either that or the researchers at Disney got the memo too late. Teaming up with researchers from Carnegie Mellon and MIT, Disney Researchers have come across a solution that would make RFID-based toys and games faster but also more efficient, by doing away with the need to even include batteries just to keep track of objects.

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Google AI pens dark poems after being force-fed 11k books

Google AI pens dark poems after being force-fed 11k books

How do humans make an artificial intelligence system better at conversations? One method-in-testing is a project in which a Google AI was force-fed 2,865 romance books, about 1,500 fantasy books, and more. The work was done by researchers with Google Brain, and involved feeding a total of 11,000 unpublished books to the neural network, then testing whether it could take a couple sentences from the book and create its own corresponding phrases. The results sound like cryptic, dark poems.

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Ax fragment found in Australia is world’s oldest

Ax fragment found in Australia is world’s oldest

The world’s oldest ax fragment has been discovered in Western Australia, researchers have announced. The fragment is very small, being only about the size of a dime or a fingernail, but it shows a distinct shape and polish that hints at its past life — as a tool used during the Stone Age by humans to make life a bit easier. According to researchers, the tool hints that these newly-arrived humans were technically inclined and able to craft items for use in the rather inhospitable Australian wild.

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Hyperloop One’s first big propulsion test was a success

Hyperloop One’s first big propulsion test was a success

The future of transportation is, according to Hyperloop One, firing you body at high speed through a pipe, and it just ran the first trial on the way there. The company - formerly known as Hyperloop Technologies - has successfully demonstrated an open-air test in North Las Vegas, Nevada, that although short is nonetheless impressive.

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Android Auto testing is more sophisticated than you might think

Android Auto testing is more sophisticated than you might think

When hearing about things like Android Auto or Apple CarPlay, you might think it simply involves mirroring Android or iOS to a car's infotainment system, give or take a few functionality deemed to be dangerous or unnecessary for driving. But unlike other iterations of Android, like Android Wear or Android TV, Android Auto has far more dire consequences when implemented poorly. That is why when Nat & Lo took their web series to Google's Android Auto Research Lab, they were met by rather sophisticated equipment, including different kinds of sensors and, of course, a driving simulator.

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Amazon Prime Air secretly recruited an all-star computer vision team

Amazon Prime Air secretly recruited an all-star computer vision team

Amazon has quietly recruited a team of computer vision all-stars to work on giving its Prime Air delivery drones the skills to navigate the skies - and land - safely. The team, which includes former Microsoft engineers, is based in Graz, Austria, and will be responsible for ensuring that the retail behemoth's rapid delivery system doesn't crash and burn.

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MARLO bipedal robot walks over snow and rough terrain with ease

MARLO bipedal robot walks over snow and rough terrain with ease

Researchers from the University of Michigan have been working on a freestanding bipedal robot called MARLO. Electrical engineering professor Jessy Grizzle and his students have been working on MARLO in an attempt to get the unsupported robot to be able to walk across varied terrain without issue. The team believes that the feedback control used in the robot could be used in other devices like powered prosthetic legs in the future.

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