research

Salamander fungus threatens all due to pet trade in USA

Salamander fungus threatens all due to pet trade in USA

Scientists warn of a biodiversity crisis as salamander imports into North America brings a fungal pathogen called "Bsal." This is short for Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans, also called "B. salamandrivorans", and it comes from regions in Asia. These scientists suggest that once inserted into wild host populations, there's no effective means of containment for this pathogen. It'll kill at alarming rates. This Bsal is about to join the already-active "ongoing sixth mass extinction" of "more than 40% of all amphibians" as the emerging infections disease Chytridiomycosis takes hold.

Continue Reading

Keys to “ingredients for life” found on Rosetta’s comet

Keys to “ingredients for life” found on Rosetta’s comet

The comet followed by the ESA's Rosetta mission and landed upon by Philae has turned up "the ingredients for life" in its most recent data package. This data may well also be the last that Philae sends via Rosetta, as the craft have just one more chance to be in alignment before they're cut off from Earth contact forever. To detect the data we're exploring today, Philae employed its Ptolemy and COSAC tools, turning up water vapor, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide.

Continue Reading

Philae’s last gasp: final Rosetta mission data published

Philae’s last gasp: final Rosetta mission data published

The European Space Agency's Philae lander has sent what's likely its last batch of data home to Earth. Having gone regretfully silent only days after it hit the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko back in November of 2014, the Rosetta mission's Philae lander re-established connection in June of 2015. Now the team's final connection was set for July 9th, and it's entirely possible the ESA won't end up being able to make contact again. We'll have to wait until August, right as the comet makes its closest approach to our Sun.

Continue Reading

ASU researchers show off first white laser

ASU researchers show off first white laser

Lasers have been around since the 60s and are used in many different applications today. Lasers come in several colors including red and green among others, but one color has eluded scientists until now. A group of researchers at Arizona State University have created the world's first white laser. The team has shown that semiconductor lasers are capable of emitting the full visible color spectrum required to produce a white light laser.

Continue Reading

Japanese researchers fire 2 petawatt laser called LFEX

Japanese researchers fire 2 petawatt laser called LFEX

Researchers in Japan recently fired the most powerful laser in the world called the LFEX or Laser for fast Ignition Experiments. The laser packs 2 petawatts of power into its fast pulse spanning one trillionth of a second. The laser is massive at more than 300 feet in length. The incredibly short laser pulse means that the laser doesn't consume as much power to operate as you might imagine.

Continue Reading

T-Rex’s serrated, folded teeth used like near-unbreakable knives

T-Rex’s serrated, folded teeth used like near-unbreakable knives

Theropod dinosaurs like the Tyrannosaurus Rex have been known to have serrated teeth for some time - today it's apparent why. A study has been published this week by lead author Kirstin Brink, a postdoctoral researcher of biology at the University of Toronto Mississauga, which shows how theropod teeth aren't just shaped the way they are to keep them from breaking under pressure, they're made to tear apart flesh the same way our modern knives are today. This awesome feature allows dinosaurs who have it to rip into meaty flesh from birth.

Continue Reading

Hawking, Musk, Wozniak, Chomsky warn of dawn of AI weaponry

Hawking, Musk, Wozniak, Chomsky warn of dawn of AI weaponry

IJCAI 2015 conference starts with open letter on the dawn of the era of autonomous weapons. This letter contains word that the machine war is not decades away, but years away. Too close to go without a hard and fast decision to outlaw autonomous weapons, to ban them worldwide, before they cause all-out chaos. The letter is short, concise, and extremely easy to understand: artificial intelligence can make the battlefield safer, it says, or AI can make the entire world a very terrible place to live.

Continue Reading

Researchers create transistors using a single molecule

Researchers create transistors using a single molecule

The heart of a processor inside a computer and other devices is the transistor. The more transistors that can be crammed inside a CPU, the better the device performs. There is a limit to how small a working transistor can be and a group of researchers has made a significant breakthrough in transistor size. The team was able to show for the first item that a single molecule can operate as a field-effect transistor.

Continue Reading

Dark side of the Pluto captured by New Horizons

Dark side of the Pluto captured by New Horizons

Today NASA reveals an image of Pluto that captures the night side of the dwarf planet. Unlike our own moon, the dark side of Pluto isn't quite such a prevailing "mystery" as it rotates. We've essentially seem at least blurry images of all parts of Pluto. This image captures the dwarf planet's atmosphere. From the side of the spherical space body that's facing away from the sun at the time of image capture, this photo was taken after NASA's New Horizons mission had already completed its closest pass.

Continue Reading

Thor robot wins 2015 RoboCup in China

Thor robot wins 2015 RoboCup in China

There are more robotics competitions around the world than you can shake a stick at. Some of these competitions have robots trying to do things like drive cars and navigate obstacles in an effort to create a robot capable of saving people in a disaster. Other competitions are more laid back and feature robots that are designed to do human things like play soccer. A robot called Thor built by researchers from UCLA and the University of Pennsylvania has won a big soccer match.

Continue Reading

1 2 3 4 5 Next