research

DARPA program seeks ‘rugged drugs’ that don’t expire

DARPA program seeks ‘rugged drugs’ that don’t expire

Much like the food in your fridge and the cleaning supplies in your closet, the drugs — both over the counter and prescription — in your medicine cabinet have an expiration date. While that expiration date isn’t a hard and fast rule in most cases, at least according to past research on the matter, it does mark a time when one can expect the medication to start losing potency, making it difficult to take proper dosages. Thanks to a new synthetic protein recently detailed by DARPA, however, that reality may itself soon be obsolete.

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Climate change may cause big spike in NYC heat deaths

Climate change may cause big spike in NYC heat deaths

We've seen record-breaking warmth across the globe for many months straight, and some places, unfortunately, have had to deal with extremely high temperatures. With those high temperatures come heat strokes and, in some cases, heat-related deaths, something expected to increase in coming years if steps aren't taken to mitigate the issue. New research, for example, says New York City could see more than 3,000 heat-related deaths a year by 2080 if preventative measures aren't pursued.

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Self-driving car tech is easy: Autonomous morals are the killer

Self-driving car tech is easy: Autonomous morals are the killer

Your self-driving car is running a smooth 50 mph when a kid chases its ball into the road. Swerve, and the kid is safe but your car will crash; keep going, and there's a good chance of running them over. With a split-second to react - not enough to push responsibility back over to whoever is inside the vehicle - what should the AI in charge do?

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Faraday Future gets self-driving car test permission

Faraday Future gets self-driving car test permission

Faraday Future has become the latest automaker to be granted autonomous vehicle testing approval in California, though what exactly the clandestine startup will be trialling is unclear. The permission, confirmed today by the California Department of Motor Vehicles, makes Faraday Future the fourteenth company to get the green light to experiment publicly with self-driving cars.

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Anti-aging human drug tests may start as early as July

Anti-aging human drug tests may start as early as July

A joint clinical study will soon be conducted by Washington University in St. Louis and Keio University in Japan, it has been announced, and it’ll involve a drug that may slow down the aging process in humans. The study may begin by early July, but it first must undergo review by the Research Ethics Committee at Keio University, which will review the plans and determine whether they’re suitable for proceeding.

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Chameleon spit is ultra sticky, enables tongue to nab insects

Chameleon spit is ultra sticky, enables tongue to nab insects

Chameleons have long intrigued humans, due in no small part to their funny eyes, their color-changing skin, and their whip-like tongues. When hunting, a chameleon will shoot its tongue out to surprising lengths, striking an insect and reeling it back in for a quick meal. How the tongue itself works is no mystery, but how it managed to cling to the insect wasn't so clear until now. Turns out, chameleons have super-sticky spit.

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1,000-core “kilo-core” processor built at UC Davis

1,000-core “kilo-core” processor built at UC Davis

When MediaTek announced its deca-core moble processor, it almost seemed insane in a world that's very much settled on octa-cores. The chip maker, however, has nothing on the silicon produced by researchers at the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of California, Davis. Although it definitely won't fit inside a smartphone, tablet, or even a laptop for that matter, the chip boasts of being the world's first kilo-core processor. That's 1,000 processing cores at your service, making even the beefiest gaming rig cry in shame.

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LIGO looks to the future after detecting second round of gravitational waves

LIGO looks to the future after detecting second round of gravitational waves

Back in September of 2015, physicists operating the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory or LIGO for short detected the first round of gravitational waves seemingly proving Einstein's theory of General Relativity. Before scientists could prove that gravitational waves existed and the first discovery wasn't a fluke, they needed to find a second round of the waves, which they did earlier this month. After proving that the first find wasn’t a fluke, the LIGO team is looking to the future.

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NASA reveals 14-motor electric X-plane prototype

NASA reveals 14-motor electric X-plane prototype

Last year NASA announced a plan to design commercial passenger airplanes that use electricity in an attempt to improve the loud, fuel-reliant planes the industry uses today. This week, the agency revealed a research prototype called X-57. Dubbed "Maxwell," after 19th century scientists James Clerk Maxwell, it's NASA's first X-plane in 10 years, and it features 14 all-electric motors.

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Blue Origin successfully lands 4th rocket, crew capsule survives crash

Blue Origin successfully lands 4th rocket, crew capsule survives crash

Just a few hours ago, private space agency Blue Origin conducted a fourth launch of its New Shepard rocket, once again successfully landing in an upright position after reaching the edge of space. This launch, which took place at roughly 10:30am ET, also saw several 'firsts,' including Blue Origin live streaming the whole event, as well as the crew capsule undergoing an intentional parachute failure to test its ability to survive.

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Study says less software piracy occurs in countries with high IQ

Study says less software piracy occurs in countries with high IQ

There's no doubt that software piracy is a major issue around the globe, costing companies and developers no small amount of money. In an attempt to better understand the practice on national levels, a group of researchers from Germany's MPRA have conducted a study determining that the rate of software piracy is significantly lower in countries with a higher collective intelligence.

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NASA teams with American Airlines to bolster flight training and more

NASA teams with American Airlines to bolster flight training and more

NASA has partnered with American Airlines in a deal that will span the next five years, giving NASA researchers observational access to AA cockpits during flights throughout the years. The observations will be used as part of the space agency’s work on improving cockpit displays, as well as flighting training and “other flight desk operations,” NASA said in a statement. Under the partnership, NASA researchers will be able to tag along on half a dozen or more round trip flights every year for the next half decade.

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