Projection

“Transparent cockpit” AR could fix driver blind spots

“Transparent cockpit” AR could fix driver blind spots

Who says augmented reality is just for games or entertainment? The same ideas and technologies that allows us to superimpose virtual images onto real objects in almost realistic fashion could very well save lives in the future. Take, for example, this "transparent car" concept from researchers from Keio University in Japan, a system that could potentially work around drivers' blind spots, letting them see crucial information that are otherwise occluded to them by doors, windows, ceilings or floors, giving them the details that they need to make that life-saving decision.

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RoomAlive augments IllumiRoom: totally interactive rooms

RoomAlive augments IllumiRoom: totally interactive rooms

While some, like Oculus and now Samsung, want to immerse you in virtual worlds by constraining your eyes to a single point and faking the world, others are taking immersion from the other end. RoomAlive can turn any regular room into a completely interactive environment for games and other content, using only off the shelf components and some specialized software.

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Microsoft SurroundWeb reworks IllumiRoom for immersive web

Microsoft SurroundWeb reworks IllumiRoom for immersive web

Microsoft has given its IllumiRoom concept a makeover, with the immersive projected gaming experience evolving to deliver interactive web content that fills the living room and engages with Xbox One, Windows Phone, and Windows. Dubbed Microsoft SurroundWeb, the concept relies on the same approach of using projectors to cast digital graphics onto the surfaces of real-world objects, like the wall surrounding a TV or the coffee table in front of it, which then react to the user within that space.

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Bot & Dolly “Box” is next-level video experiment in projection-mapping

Bot & Dolly “Box” is next-level video experiment in projection-mapping

This week the team at Bot & Dolly - a group that works with 3D objects and video to experiment with art and live performance - have created a new experiment with live projection on moving objects. This project is known as "Box", and works with projection-mapping - projecting images on to spots that are mapped and tracked as the projector seeks them from afar. The result is a video demonstration you the don't have to be technically aware of to enjoy.

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Corning shows off 82″ multi-touch display with Gorilla Glass 2

Corning shows off 82″ multi-touch display with Gorilla Glass 2

Today at CES we managed to run into an awesome 82" multi-touch display being ran by Corning. What we have on video below is actually a quick demonstration of the new 82" display showcasing its unlimited amounts of multi-touch points, stylus support, and more from the guys at Perceptive Pixel. What makes this display special is that it's the world's largest Gorilla Glass 2 display.

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Lumus DK-32 wearable display hands-on

Lumus DK-32 wearable display hands-on

Technology made by the Lumus group has been applied to a pair of glasses shown at CES 2012, and today we're getting our first chance to take a peek at a demo unit. These glasses are not a consumer product, instead being shown off here as a demonstration piece of equipment so that the Lumus technology can be picked up by a manufacturer and made into a real deal for-sale piece of equipment. The video below is also your rare chance to see your humble narrator without glasses on in the interim, only to move on into the 3D world with Lumus.

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Vuzix secures Nokia technology license for see-through optics technology

Vuzix secures Nokia technology license for see-through optics technology

It appears that the folks at Vuzix have come one step closer to creating a perfect pair of displays in eyeglasses as they today collaborate with Nokia to enter into a technology license agreement to both develop and create see-through waveguide optics for near-eye display systems. This agreement is for head mounted displays as well as video eyewear, all of this based on Nokia's see-through EPE (Exit Pupil Expanding) optics technology. Will this bring your glasses into the display-toting future for a much easier way to tap into the science fiction of tomorrow? Let's see!

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