Project Glass

2015 Hyundai Genesis packs Google Glass app and AWD option

2015 Hyundai Genesis packs Google Glass app and AWD option

Hyundai has revealed the new 2015 Genesis, adding AWD and a head-up display, as well as a stiffer platform than a BMW 5-series, and integration with both Apple's Siri and Google Glass. The new car, which will hit US showrooms this spring, can use the Glass Blue Link app to allow drivers to remotely unlock and start the sedan, locate it in a parking lot, send points-of-interest to the dashboard navigation system, and track down the nearest gas station. Meanwhile, there's also support for the iPhone's "Eyes Free" mode using Siri to control things like Apple Maps, calls, messaging, and more.

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Corvette Stingray turns Google Glass into driver info HUD

Corvette Stingray turns Google Glass into driver info HUD

When like Chevrolet you've got a WiFi and LTE connection integrated into the brain of your cars, there's more you can do than just get the kids online in the rear seats: you can turn Google Glass into a head-up display. Demonstrated as a proof-of-concept here at CES 2014, the Chevrolet Glass app hooks up specifically to the new Corvette Stingray, feeding real-time statistics like speed, gear, engine RPM, and G-force straight to the screen of the Android wearable.

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Google Glass prescription frames revealed by Rochester Optical

Google Glass prescription frames revealed by Rochester Optical

The first prescription lens option for Google Glass has been revealed, with Rochester Optical sneaking in ahead of Google's own official frames with a custom carrier that can be slotted into the Android wearable. The system, which consists of a set of frames - Rochester Optical calls it the Glass Prescription Lens Carrier (GLPC) - that clip into the bridge of Glass and cost from $99 for the single-vision lenses and $129 for the GLPC itself.

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Google Glass prescription frame option priced up for Explorers

Google Glass prescription frame option priced up for Explorers

Prescription lenses for Google Glass will be priced from $99, one start-up has confirmed, with Rochester Optical revealing early cost details ahead of preorders opening after CES 2014 next week. The company, which confirmed its prescription option for those wanting to use Google's wearable as their regular spectacles was due "in just a few weeks" courtesy of a questionnaire last week, will offer a number of packages that clip onto Glass rather than requiring it be dismantled and attached to a new headpiece, as Google's own system looks to involve.

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Glass invites offered to Google Play Music All Access subscribers

Glass invites offered to Google Play Music All Access subscribers

Google has broadened its Glass invitations to a new group, paid subscribers to Google Play Music All Access, though they'll still have to stump up the not-inconsiderable $1,500-plus-tax sticker price on the beta wearable. The invitations, which are being emailed to All Access subscribers, bills the deal as being to mark the addition of Play Music streaming support to Glass earlier this month.

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Google Glass Prescription Lenses coming “in just a few weeks”

Google Glass Prescription Lenses coming “in just a few weeks”

This week the folks at Rochester Optical have sent out questionnaires for users of Google Glass that wish to upgrade their pair to prescription lenses. This is the next step in the evolution of Google Glass, allowing users who would otherwise be wearing glasses and the Glass headset to combine the two into one. Rochester Optical is, thus far, the one and only group to be joining Google in this effort.

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Google Glass real-time facial recognition arrives with “NameTag”

Google Glass real-time facial recognition arrives with “NameTag”

Since the first demonstration of the plausible future abilities of Google Glass, instant facial recognition has been one of the most exciting ideas in the pipeline. According the the development group Facial Network, the time for real-time facial recognition through Google Glass is coming a lot sooner than we originally expected. This isn't an app developed by Google, it's a 3rd party developer group - they've gone and done it first!

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Should I be ashamed of wearing Google Glass?

Should I be ashamed of wearing Google Glass?

I love new technology, and I love wearables, and I love Google Glass, but I can't wear it out in public. Google's head-mounted computer is gradually proliferating, as the company opens up its pyramid-scheme of invitations, but the numbers are still small, and though I appreciate the functionality Glass brings, I'm struggling to sport it out in the wild without extreme self-consciousness. As a geek among geeks in San Francisco, there should be nothing holding me back; as a vocal advocate of wearables, I ought to be flying the flag with my fifteen-hundred-dollar early-adopter beacon. So what's taking the gloss off Glass?

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MyGlass for iOS released (again) but lacks iMessage support

MyGlass for iOS released (again) but lacks iMessage support

Google has released the MyGlass for iOS app, giving iPhone users the same navigation and other functionality with the Glass headset as their Android counterparts have, after prematurely setting it wild earlier in the week. Whereas iPhone users would previously have to use the web-based interface to adjust their Glass settings, and did not get the same turn-by-turn directions support as with Android phones, the new app allows the wearable to access the iOS smartphone's GPS among other things.

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Google Glass Glassware apps stack up: Winkfeed, YouTube, Hangouts

Google Glass Glassware apps stack up: Winkfeed, YouTube, Hangouts

This week a collection of apps in the Glassware category have arrived for users of the Google Glass headset. This device is one that's currently still in a limited release mode, but having just entered a phase that just about edges up on the first full release of the machine, developers are taking hold. What we're seeing today is a set of 3 new apps and two new updates to previously solid apps.

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