Project Glass

Glass Traffic app throws wearables back into driver safety discussion

Glass Traffic app throws wearables back into driver safety discussion

A new traffic app for Google Glass is likely to throw the safety aspects of wearables back into question, as new hands-free technology butts heads with more traditional dashboard displays like Apple's new CarPlay. Traffic, the handiwork of Glass developer GlassVuz, fills in one of the gaps in the Google headset's navigation system, bringing real-time traffic data to the head-up display.

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Nod to Pay turns Glass into mobile Bitcoin wallet

Nod to Pay turns Glass into mobile Bitcoin wallet

A Dutch start-up wants to make Bitcoin payments as easy as nodding your head, with EAZE revealing "Nod to Pay" using Google Glass, the virtual currency, and QR codes. Triggered by the voice command "OK Glass, make a payment" and then finalized by a simple nod gesture, the system makes payments a completely hands-off process.

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Google lobbying against Glass driving bans

Google lobbying against Glass driving bans

Google is fighting back against threats that Glass could be banned from use by drivers, lobbying US state officials in the hope of more nuanced guidelines than an all-out block on in-car wearable tech. The safety of head-mounted displays like Glass made headlines last year, after one "Glass Explorer" early-adopter was ticketed for distracted driving after being pulled over for speeding and found to be wearing Google's experimental gadget.

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Glass gets GoPro video streaming with Hindsight

Glass gets GoPro video streaming with Hindsight

Google Glass wearers can now stream video directly from their GoPro sports cameras, thanks to a new app that hooks up the WiFi-enabled camera to the wearable. Hindsight, the handiwork of developer team ShadyDev, allows a GoPro like the Hero 3 to pair directly with Glass and then stream video from it, all controlled with voice commands.

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A Google Now HTC Smartwatch could conquer context

A Google Now HTC Smartwatch could conquer context

HTC, so the rumor machine goes, is readying its first smartwatches, at least one of which is said to pipe Google Now directly to the wrist. If you're going to build a smartwatch, and you're anywhere close to being committed to Android, I'd argue Google Now is a pretty solid place to start. It certainly satisfies one of the key metrics I tend to judge wearables by: it "gets" context.

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Kopin Pupil hands-on: Glass tech without geek looks

Kopin Pupil hands-on: Glass tech without geek looks

Kopin has revealed its latest wearable system, Pupil, a combination of a micro-display and voice control noise-cancellation system the company hopes will eventually be used in head-worn tech like Google's Glass. A reference design intending to show how wearable computing could be integrated into a design that's more palatable to the consumer market, Pupil isn't intended for the market in its current form, but is instead intended to showcase the fruits of Kopin's new partnership with Olympus in display technology. We caught up with Kopin to find out more.

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Google Glass etiquette list suggests you “don’t be creepy or rude”

Google Glass etiquette list suggests you “don’t be creepy or rude”

The team responsible for shaping the social impact of Google Glass on society - or so it would seem - have revealed a list of "do’s and don’ts" for the headwear this afternoon. This list suggests many things, several of which are givens, a few of which we’d expected would be more unique to the user. It all boils down to being reasonable, it would seem, and having common sense.

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Layar takes renewed stab at simplifying interactive magazine pages

Layar takes renewed stab at simplifying interactive magazine pages

This week the folks at Layar have spoken up on their newest update to the system they called Layar Creator. With this tool, users are able to create images that, when tapped in on with a device (like a mobile phone, for example), will become interactive. This is done with augmented reality.

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Glass hits operating theater as wearable tech boosts cancer surgery

Glass hits operating theater as wearable tech boosts cancer surgery

"OK Glass, show me an X-ray." Surgeons at Indiana University Health Methodist Hospital are turning to Glass to summon patient records and more, with the hospital the first to use Google's wearable during abdominal surgery. Two physicians, Dr. Szotek and Dr. Jeff Browne, each sported Glass during the four-hour procedure, relying on Google's voice control to access medical information as they sliced out a tumor.

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Virgin Atlantic eyes Google Glass to give service a more personal touch

Virgin Atlantic eyes Google Glass to give service a more personal touch

Google Glass is starting to see experiments in how it can be uses outside of the usual navigation purposes, which is good for such a niche device. However, some of the uses might still manage to raise some eyebrows and shake some heads due to concerns over privacy, not to mention practicality.

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Glass UI concept trades minimalism for wearable workability

Glass UI concept trades minimalism for wearable workability

Google's Glass may be a self confessed work-in-progress for the company, but that hasn't stopped early-adopters from coming up with their own alternative visions for how the wearable should work. Disappointed by the shortcomings of Glass' minimalistic interface, one explorer has cooked up a new UI of his own, trying to cut down on the amount of needless touchpad swiping, make media easier to find in the timeline, and make better use of voice commands.

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NYPD tipped testing Google Glass

NYPD tipped testing Google Glass

The New York City Police Department has unofficially made public their intention to beta-test Google Glass for use in the field. In a chat with Venture Beat, what they call a "ranking New York City law enforcement official" has spoken up on the subject, apparently wanting not to be named specifically. At the moment it would appear that they're only looking at the headsets, "seeing how they work."

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