Project Glass

Why I didn’t become a Google Glass Explorer

Why I didn’t become a Google Glass Explorer

Late last year, I reported on these pages that I was offered by Google to become a Google Glass Explorer. I had signed up to be notified when it was "opening its books" and Google offered me beta access to the program. Like everyone else, I was asked to pay $1,500 to become an Explorer and get my Google Glass headwear. I would then become the Explorer I thought I wanted to be.

When the notice came that I could join the program, my first reaction was to sign up. But then I took a step back, came to these pages to find out what the world thought, and make a decision from there. I decided against the move, realizing that right now might not be the best time to be an Explorer.

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Glass Traffic app throws wearables back into driver safety discussion

Glass Traffic app throws wearables back into driver safety discussion

A new traffic app for Google Glass is likely to throw the safety aspects of wearables back into question, as new hands-free technology butts heads with more traditional dashboard displays like Apple's new CarPlay. Traffic, the handiwork of Glass developer GlassVuz, fills in one of the gaps in the Google headset's navigation system, bringing real-time traffic data to the head-up display.

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Google lobbying against Glass driving bans

Google lobbying against Glass driving bans

Google is fighting back against threats that Glass could be banned from use by drivers, lobbying US state officials in the hope of more nuanced guidelines than an all-out block on in-car wearable tech. The safety of head-mounted displays like Glass made headlines last year, after one "Glass Explorer" early-adopter was ticketed for distracted driving after being pulled over for speeding and found to be wearing Google's experimental gadget.

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Kopin Pupil hands-on: Glass tech without geek looks

Kopin Pupil hands-on: Glass tech without geek looks

Kopin has revealed its latest wearable system, Pupil, a combination of a micro-display and voice control noise-cancellation system the company hopes will eventually be used in head-worn tech like Google's Glass. A reference design intending to show how wearable computing could be integrated into a design that's more palatable to the consumer market, Pupil isn't intended for the market in its current form, but is instead intended to showcase the fruits of Kopin's new partnership with Olympus in display technology. We caught up with Kopin to find out more.

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Google Glass etiquette list suggests you “don’t be creepy or rude”

Google Glass etiquette list suggests you “don’t be creepy or rude”

The team responsible for shaping the social impact of Google Glass on society - or so it would seem - have revealed a list of "do’s and don’ts" for the headwear this afternoon. This list suggests many things, several of which are givens, a few of which we’d expected would be more unique to the user. It all boils down to being reasonable, it would seem, and having common sense.

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Glass hits operating theater as wearable tech boosts cancer surgery

Glass hits operating theater as wearable tech boosts cancer surgery

"OK Glass, show me an X-ray." Surgeons at Indiana University Health Methodist Hospital are turning to Glass to summon patient records and more, with the hospital the first to use Google's wearable during abdominal surgery. Two physicians, Dr. Szotek and Dr. Jeff Browne, each sported Glass during the four-hour procedure, relying on Google's voice control to access medical information as they sliced out a tumor.

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