Project Glass

Google Q3 buoyant despite Motorola stumbles as Page talks smartwatches

Google Q3 buoyant despite Motorola stumbles as Page talks smartwatches

Google made $14.9bn in revenue in Q3 2013 despite Motorola Mobility sales continuing to shrink, with CEO Larry Page making one final earnings call to praise the Chromecast and namecheck smartwatches as one of the next big things in digital. Overall, revenues were up 12-percent versus the same quarter last year, with cash or cash-equivalents on hand amounting to $56.52bn. Speaking on the investor webcast, Page highlighted the speed at which the multi-screen world had developed, pointing to wearables like Glass and smartwatches as examples, and saying he no longer need feel guilty about spending time visiting the Android team.

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Google Glass double-blink for photos appears in firmware update

Google Glass double-blink for photos appears in firmware update

There's little doubt at this point that a future update for Google Glass will unveil the ability to take a photo using little more than a blink. In the most recent firmware update pushed to the wearable headset, it's been revealed that a previously known feature has been given a new name, complete with connection to the icon known as wink_for_photo. This icon can readily be attached to the likes of a new "gaze" folder with "double_blink_detector" inside.

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Google patent utilizes real-life “heart” hand gesture with Glass

Google patent utilizes real-life “heart” hand gesture with Glass

If you think you're going to make the world your oyster with Google Glass without raising your hands up to circle your favorite objects, you're in for a real change of heart. What we're seeing today is a patent application made by Google to keep the idea of "hearting" things to themselves. What you'd do is curve your index fingers and make your thumbs into the heart's point, and poof, you've added your support for that object in the real world.

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Wearables addictive and unstoppable says Google X’s Mary Lou Jepsen

Wearables addictive and unstoppable says Google X’s Mary Lou Jepsen

Wearable computing is an unstoppable, addictive force that could well step in to address neurodegenerative illnesses where medicine cannot, Google X's Mary Lou Jepsen says, though the display division chief refuses to be drawn on what her team is working on inside the clandestine lab. "It's coming. I don't think it's stoppable" Jepsen said of wearables like Google's Glass which she wore round her neck while speaking at MIT's EmTech conference on Thursday. However while it may be inescapable, Jepsen still can't tell us about her particular role in the future; "Sergey insists" on continued secrecy around her project, she explained, referring to Google X lab overseer and Google co-founder Sergey Brin.

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Google using $10m quantum computer to understand Glass future

Google using $10m quantum computer to understand Glass future

Google has used some of the most advanced computing technology, quantum chips in the D-Wave computer it has bought with NASA, to address one of the most basic issues in its Glass wearable: figuring out if users are blinking on purpose or involuntarily. The perhaps humdrum implementation, revealed for the first time this week in a film about the technology, has seen the quantum computer - which is based at Google's Quantum Artificial Intelligence Lab - bring its ability to examine complex multiples of possibilities effectively simultaneously to bear on refining the algorithms involved in Glass and its non-traditional control systems.

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Google Glass XE10 adds Transit directions but no native apps

Google Glass XE10 adds Transit directions but no native apps

Google has updated its Glass wearable with public transit directions, with firmware XE10 turning the headset into a city navigator, though the much-anticipated local app support is still missing. The new Glass OS works with the Android MyGlass app to push transit information about buses, street cars, subways, and other public transportation options to the eyepiece, with not only timetables but guidance on where to change trains, the distance to the nearest bus stop, and overall ETA. It's not the only new feature to arrive in XE10, too.

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Samsung Gear Glass tipped for 2014

Samsung Gear Glass tipped for 2014

Samsung will launch a Google Glass rival, currently dubbed the Galaxy Gear Glass, sometime in Q2 2014 an insider claims, supposedly expanding its wearable family with a head-worn computer. The work-in-progress gadget is expected to arrive in April or May next year, according to Eldar Murtazin, following up the Galaxy Gear smartwatch which Samsung launched in Berlin last month. Although still unconfirmed by Samsung itself, the teased device needn't be too far from what Samsung has already developed for the wrist.

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Google Glass Glassware native apps off to sporty start with Thuuz

Google Glass Glassware native apps off to sporty start with Thuuz

Thuuz has released a Glassware version of its sports tracking app for fans who want to keep close tabs on their favorite teams while wearing Google Glass. This Glassware lets users set their favorite teams, subscribe to professional sports journalists and "super fans" who know their stuff, and get alerts when there's an especially exciting sports moment happening that they might want to tune in to.

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Grand Theft Auto hack turns Google Glass into head-up gaming display

Grand Theft Auto hack turns Google Glass into head-up gaming display

Grand Theft Auto and Glass may be more commonly about the broken variety than Google's wearable, but that hasn't stopped one developer from cooking up some head-up map integration between the game and the headset. Mike DiGiovanni's realtime GPS for Grand Theft Auto 3 on Glass may only work with the third installment of the game, not the latest - billion-dollar selling - GTA5, but its potential is clear: a live map showing your progress floating in the corner of your vision, rather than forcing you to take your attention away from the main action.

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