Project Glass

Google Glass 2 coming in 2016, but not for you

Google Glass 2 coming in 2016, but not for you

The second big release for Google Glass is on its way, but not in the way the remaining "Glass for Fun" enthusiasts might've hoped. Instead it would seem that those pushing for an enterprise angle for the headset have gotten their wish. This second-generation Google Glass won't be built for the public. It'll be built for businesses. While the possibility remains that Glass for Fun could pop up, for now it's more of a pipe dream for the average citizen and lover of leisure.

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Samsung wearable to beat HoloLens with 3D-cam and 2x Glass

Samsung wearable to beat HoloLens with 3D-cam and 2x Glass

Samsung may be next on the list of hardware companies to deliver a smart headset with dual-Google Glass-like displays, 3D cameras, and augmented reality/holography. This device does not yet have a formal name, instead opting in early registration documents as a "wearable display apparatus" only. The image you see before you is not the same as Samsung's earlier Google Glass competitor seen back in January of 2014 - this headset is brand new. It's wireless, and it's sporting virtual imagery the likes of which we've never seen before.

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Apple Watch requirements: lower friction, faster access

Apple Watch requirements: lower friction, faster access

The Apple Watch has been launched today - more or less - and is being proliferated around the world through the eyes and ears of onlookers. While some consumers have gotten their devices, most of the population of the world has yet to jump aboard the smartwatch train - or even the wearables train. As such, we've had a talk with Andrej Kostresevic, CEO for Nomads, about what it'll take to bring the smartwatch to the public, starting with the idea that Android Wear has a "lack of friction" and the idea that Google Glass "failed."

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Google Glass v2 in works confirms Luxottica (and v3, too)

Google Glass v2 in works confirms Luxottica (and v3, too)

Google Glass version 2, hopefully without the sort of styling only a geek could love and more everyday functionality, is already in progress, Google's eyewear partner has confirmed. The head-worn wearable's demise in its Explorer Edition form was heralded by some as an admission that the project was a failure, but Google insisted that a phased roadmap was always the intention. Now, one of the key players involved in that roadmap has spoken up.

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Google Glass team needed to “reset their strategy” says CFO

Google Glass team needed to “reset their strategy” says CFO

Google's Chief Financial Officer Patrick Pichette spoke up this afternoon during the company's Q4 2014 earnings call about Glass. Briefly mentioning Glass as an example of a project that needed to "take a pause", Pichette continued by suggesting that Google sometimes does have to "take the tough calls." He didn't say the company would be closing shop on Google Glass, but he got just about as close to saying such a thing as he could without the media making the call - and they still just might.

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Google Glass’ victory lap: a brief history gallery for Explorers

Google Glass’ victory lap: a brief history gallery for Explorers

Today Google Glass Explorers were given a digital book thanking them for taking part in the first big leg of the Glass journey. This book goes by the name GLASS VOL 1, emphasizing - again - that this is not the end of the road for the smart headset, it's just a chapter marker. This book begins with an inspirational quote: "To discover new places, sometimes we need to leave the map behind." This document acts as an extensive Thank You card to users as well as a victory lap for Google Glass creators.

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It’s time to hit reset – not delete – on Google Glass

It’s time to hit reset – not delete – on Google Glass

Farewell, Explorers. Goodbye, Glass. Google's decision to spin out its controversial wearable into a standalone business was instantly portrayed by many as the often-predicted death of the headset, but the reality is less clear-cut. Glass' struggles saw early enthusiasm sour when questions around privacy and usefulness collided head-on with anti-ostentatious-geek sentiment, and the "face computer" never managed to restore its reputation. While the temptation may be to hit delete on the whole saga, I'd argue a Glass reboot with far greater focus on how head-worn wearables might fit into our daily lives would be a far more rewarding strategy.

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Google Glass now under Tony Fadell, exits Google X

Google Glass now under Tony Fadell, exits Google X

The Google Glass Explorer Program has officially been tapped by Google to shut down. That doesn't mean that there won't be any more Google Glass - in fact the opposite, more than likely - it's just part of the transition process. When a group exits inside Google X, Google's experimentation lab, it generally has more of a "not quite ready for the real world" vibe to it - now Google Glass is being brought into that real world. The real working world - not necessarily as a consumer product.

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Google Glass is still around, so says Google

Google Glass is still around, so says Google

From now until the 16th of February, the de Young Museum in San Francisco will be hosting Keith Haring: The Political Line, fully Google Glass-friendly. It's not a direct effort on the part of Google to represent Glass for new users - they're not exactly aiming for the consumer market at the moment - but it is set to be a treat for Google Glass Explorers. The "Explorer" group of Google Glass owners are the first wave - early adopters - and possibly the last wave of users outside the enterprise market.

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Here’s why Intel makes perfect sense for Google Glass v2

Here’s why Intel makes perfect sense for Google Glass v2

Guess what: Google Glass isn’t dead. The news that Intel will probably be found inside the next generation of Glass wasn’t so much a surprise for its “x86 vs ARM” narrative, but that Google was not only still committed to the wearable project but actively developing it. Although unconfirmed, as the whispers would have it, Intel’s silicon will oust the aging TI cellphone processor found in the current iteration of Glass, quite the coup for a chipmaker still struggling to make a dent in mobile. The switch is about more than just running Glass’ Android fork, however: it could mean a fundamental and hugely beneficial evolution in how Glass operates and how it addresses some of the current shortcomings in battery life and dependence on the cloud.

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Glass-less Brin raises doubts about the eyewear’s future

Glass-less Brin raises doubts about the eyewear’s future

At the red carpet Annual Breakthrough Prize Awards held at Silicon Valley, Google co-founder Sergey Brin arrived on the scene without his usual accessory, his Google Glass, adorning his head. Although the exec did say he left his in the car, perhaps for the sake of respect and propriety, the absence of a product placement in a high profile tech even managed to spark some discussion about the Google's "moonshot" product. Is Google Glass DOA? Of course, Google would insist otherwise, but some are pointing to writings on the wall.

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Samsung’s flexible electronics could make its Glass rival less ugly

Samsung’s flexible electronics could make its Glass rival less ugly

Samsung may not have unleashed its long-rumored Glass rival, but behind the scenes the company has been piecing together the components for just such a device, or indeed a new range of bending wearables. Samsung Electro-Mechanics has quietly shown off a line-up of flexible PCBs which could potentially wrap inside a face-hugging headset or curve neatly around a wrist for a future smartwatch, along with a grab bag of other components such as multi-mode sensors and more flexible wireless charging systems.

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